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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, been a while...

I'll be up in the Torngat National Park (Labrador) next July/August and hear that Arctic char fishing is excellent. Any first-hand hints on tackle and methods would be most appreciated.
We'll be kayaking, and our emphasis is on catching some fish to eat.
Thanks in advance
 

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Hi Josko - Any room for an on-site collaborator? That's been on my bucket list since forever. Also, I have a name for you with first-hand experience let me get his email and get back to you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Char fishing was quite good (north of Nain, NL), but I was quite dismayed by the number and density of gillnets set out for char and salmon. There were cases where a gillnet was set clear across a river mouth in an attempt to intercept fish heading upstream.
Does anybody know the legal status of ocean salmon gillnetting in NL?
 

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Hi all, been a while...

I'll be up in the Torngat National Park (Labrador) next July/August and hear that Arctic char fishing is excellent. Any first-hand hints on tackle and methods would be most appreciated.
We'll be kayaking, and our emphasis is on catching some fish to eat.
Thanks in advance
Hello, I can advise you to catch Arctic char on a float tackle.

This method is most effective during the mass movement of fish from the sea to the rivers. Most often this happens in the first two summer months. But since some part of the char remains in the river for the whole year, then catching this fish becomes possible
all year round.

Only during the ice age, the char will not be caught. Boiled salmon caviar is considered the best bait for catching char using float
tackle. The larger the eggs, the better. In some cases, artificial baits similar to eggs are used.

They also catch fresh and even spoiled caviar. The preferred length of the rod is from 3 m.
A reliable reel with a fishing line is required, the diameter of which is 0.25-0.35 mm. Single hooks are most often used.

The scenario is usually as follows: the fish immediately rushes to the bait, and the float rapidly follows to the bottom. If you don't hook it right away, the prey
will get off the hook.
 
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