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  #1  
Old 01-08-2003, 04:20 PM
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juro juro is offline
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Talking NOW HIRING - Resident Entomologists

We need volunteers to feature a bug a month for the FORUM's trout board. It doesn't matter if it's one person, affectionately called "the bug doctor" -or- if it's 12 people.

There will be some form of compensation, based on fund raising success, in the form of flyfishing related stuff, maybe from sponsors, etc. I have no idea, but the person would do it for the fun of it and not for the material reward

The objective is to get more entomologically educated around here. I for one am only really familiar with caddis first, then stoneflies second. I have been fascinated with hatches, but really unaware of what is happening.

Do we have any bug doctors out there?
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  #2  
Old 01-08-2003, 04:39 PM
BigDave BigDave is offline
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Juro,

When you say a bug a month do you mean a short feature about a particular insect, when/where it is prevalent, flies that imitate it etc, or simply a fly pattern per month? Perhaps it still up to interpretation...

I would be happy to contribute in some capacity although I would hardly consider myself an entemologist. Hardly know any scientific names, but I have a decent idea of how/when bugs come off, at least in my home waters of MA.

-Dave
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  #3  
Old 01-08-2003, 04:51 PM
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juro juro is offline
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I hope I didn't create an intimidating demand, let me reiterate -

We'll feature an important insect periodically, a month sounds good, unless we are more motivated, and enhance our knowledge base as a community.

Don't worry about the formatting, just the words and pics.

Instead of a post, it will be a bona fide article. We traditionally award fly lines to article contributors, so that seems like a good approach to continue.

Best bug article will be voted on each year, and an annual prize will be awarded to the recipient of the most votes.
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  #4  
Old 01-08-2003, 04:53 PM
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dansteelieman dansteelieman is offline
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hmmm....

I do alot with macorinvertebrates and know alot about stream entomology. I am good with names and scientifics, and I am constantley studying this. I am was hired and am doing sidework for my local watershed to collect samples and write reports on the basis of bethnic biology and stream management!

Let me know....
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  #5  
Old 01-08-2003, 05:42 PM
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Lefty Lefty is offline
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Juro,
This is the best idea you've had in.....well...years!
I can't help out, because I'm the one who needs it most! I would love to see pictures of insects to learn the various phases. Images of the flies that imitate them would be handy too. Thanks. I hope someone can do at least the basics. I forget the difference between a "spentwing" and a "spinner dun?, done?, kaput"etc. etc. Shrug?

Lefty
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  #6  
Old 01-08-2003, 07:09 PM
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FlyFishAR FlyFishAR is offline
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I just want to make sure I'm on the mailing list. I could offer some names for suggestions.......... but mine wouldn't be one of them. My bug knowledge needs a major overhaul.

John
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  #7  
Old 01-08-2003, 08:37 PM
DEERHAAWK DEERHAAWK is offline
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Entomology Primer

Good day,
Grand subject my friend! The Theakston Class Method always comes to mind when the subject turns to "bugs". He found it this way.
First class: Perlids, or Browns, commonly out at dusk or on dark days. These are carnivorous and show in the late spring or summer.
Second Class: Plecoptera, or Drakes. These are Lace, or Vein winged.
Third Class: Ephemeroptera, or Duns. These are Caddis or case worms. "Dun" refering to the color of Thunder Clouds.
Fourth Class: Diptera and Tipulidae, or Spinners. These are Crane flys, Mosquitoes, Spiders etc.
Fifth Class: Anthomyiid, Muscid, Calliphoridae. These are your common Flys; House, Blue Bottle, Dung, etc.
Sixth Class: Coleoptera, or Beetles. Paul, Joh... I mean Soldier, Squash, etc
Seventh Class: Hymenoptera or Ants and Tera. Bees, Wasps, etc.
Extra Class: Hemerodius. Gauze Wing
But I like this stack better...
1- Ephemeroptera- May/day flys, Which are short lived, a 1 day life span. They have an evening hatch only, and there are aprox 550 species in N.A. With 2 or 3 filament like tails, the males dance and mate in flight.
2- Plecoptera- Plaited, or folded wings. Crawls among stones, wings lie flat on body. There are aprox. 400 species in N.A. They have 2 filament tails only, and the absense of them in a water body means a lack of Oxygen or polution. #1 Calif.Pteronarcys, or Giant, #2 Calif. Acroneuria, or common.
3- Neuroptera- Lace, Net, Nerve, or Transparent wing. There are aprox 330+ species in N.A. They have large compound eyes and help to control destructive insects. Brown, Green, and Giant Lace wings all common.
4- Trichoptera- Hairy wing. Caddis, Case worms. They are poor flyers, come out at night and hide during the day. Adult has 1 month life span, the larval stage is like a caterpillar, crawling over rocks or living in portable cases. There are 1000 species/8 family orders in N.A. #1 Bettens silverstreak, #2 Tawny brown longhorn.
5- Diptera- Two winged. Mosquitoes, Gnats, flies. There are aprox 16,000+ species in N.A. #1 Giant western crane, #2 Net winged midge. Also Punkies, Black, and March flys.
Extra- Orthoptera- Hoppers, Crickets, Locust. There are about 1000 species in N.A.
Now, has your bottom lip fallen on the floor yet? It all clicks when you see one fly in front of you, and you can describe it!
I love Fly Fishing....
Deerhawk
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  #8  
Old 01-08-2003, 09:16 PM
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pmflyfisher pmflyfisher is offline
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Great idea look forward to the input, looks like we have some real knowledgeable people here.

I need some refreshing on this subject.

Reminds me I have to reread some sections of my fly entomology books.

PM Out
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  #9  
Old 01-08-2003, 09:17 PM
John Desjardins John Desjardins is offline
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Thumbs up

Juro, Great idea for those of us that do the size, appearance, color matching without ever knowing what the bugs are.
__________________
John Desjardins
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  #10  
Old 01-08-2003, 10:08 PM
flytyer flytyer is offline
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Deerhaawk.

Don't you just love it when you know what the bugs are (at least to the genus and family level) that the fishes are eating or that you see when astream, whether in the air, under rocks in the stream, or on the bank. Knowing what bug it is makes for a finer trout fishing outing because it both adds to the total experience and gives an advantage when fishing due to knowing how the insect behaves so y0u can better imitate it.

Learning about the bugs was a passion of mine from age 8 until age 38. It ended when I moved to Northwest Washington and got steelhead fever 11 years ago. Interestingly, my kids will trun over rocks and catch Mayflies, Caddisflies, Stoneflies, Midges, Craneflies when they see them flying by on the stream. They then ask or tell me what type it is. They also are facinated by the nymphal and larval forms of aquatic insects.
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  #11  
Old 01-08-2003, 10:29 PM
artb artb is offline
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Cool Anderscoggin flies

Juro, That is a great idea. I see that on the flier for Marlboro a fisherman is going to have a show on the Anderscroggin. That is a "Hidden Jewel" I have fished it quite a bit in the past. I am adding to the thread 2 pictures of flies I took while fishing there. One of them hit me in the back of the head almost knocked me in the river before landing on a Painted flower. The second is of a Caddis fly, one time I got there at the height of the hatch. While not being an Entomologist I do know a little bit. I have quite a few books on the subject including Aquatic Entomology written by W. Patrick McCafferty published in 1981. I could lookup and post some information if it is wanted.:eyecrazy:
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  #12  
Old 01-08-2003, 10:32 PM
artb artb is offline
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Caddis

Anyone know what insect the first picture is? I do know.
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  #13  
Old 01-08-2003, 10:42 PM
DEERHAAWK DEERHAAWK is offline
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The Book

Good evening,
Nature is a book to be read and understood, it is wonderfull how children are drawn to its pages, how easly they see, and equally as wonderfull when men and women dont loose that child-like vission. I love comming up from the water at sunset, and seeing the clouds of hatch blanketing the landscape. I love to watch the dance, to stand waist deep while Trout enjoy there supper. When it is Truth we enjoy, Truth is revealed more as we turn the pages!
Deerhawk
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  #14  
Old 01-08-2003, 10:48 PM
flytyer flytyer is offline
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Artb,

The first bug looks like a Dobson Fly. The adult of the Eastern Hellgramite. They are about 3 to 3 1/2 inches long and have a dark brown underbody. I use to see them on the Lehigh River in Pennsylvania and the upper Delaware between Pennsilvania and New York. Only ever caught smallmouths on them, and then only on larval imitations. A large black woololy bugger tied with dark dun saddle hackle and no Krystal Flash in the tail is an excellent imitation of it when tied on a large 4X (#2,4,6) hook. My father and brother who live in Pennsylvania request several dozen of them from me each year.
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  #15  
Old 01-08-2003, 11:16 PM
DEERHAAWK DEERHAAWK is offline
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Pic #2

Howdy,
Flytyer, is the Dobson a true fly?, or Cleoptera (Beetle) Looked like some yellow on the wing, any color on the abdomen (red?)
Deerhawk
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