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Old 12-12-2011, 03:37 PM
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Split shot vs. weighted fly

To avoid diluting the Los Roques thread I've started a new thread.

To me yes, there is a huge difference because the purpose of a barbell weighted fly as I tie them is to invert the hook in very skinny sight fishing situations. The objective is to counter the hook with minimal mass. I also continue to use 811s light wire to further reduce the weight needed. It is a hindrance but a down-point will snag on the bottom just when the fish arrives. Using a split shot would only compound the problem on the flats.

A split shot is almost always used with a bobber (indicator) some are huge orange balls lately, such that the bobber and weight counter each other to effect a float fishing presentation. The weight is not a hindrance but desired.

A weighted fly would not work under a bobber unless it was weighted several times more than the barbell eyes on a bonefish or striper flats fly. I can cast the fly with barbell eyes the full fly line in the right conditions, with no degradation of form. The split shot is most often used to propel the fly between drifts, at least as I have observed.

I have fished many places and many species but do not possess a global view of the sport - it could be that I am only seeing things from my perspective and others are fishing in totally different situations.

I fish saltwater flats, rips and surf for striped bass; tarpon and bonefish; traditional river Spey for steelhead and salmon, and ocean feeding pacific salmon with a rare trout pursuit now and again.

This probably influences and possibly limits my perspective. Again, unless the observer is wearing a badge it doesn't matter what anyone else thinks.
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  #2  
Old 12-13-2011, 09:13 PM
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For trout, I use small split shot and moldable weight for most nymphing, I don't generally weight my fly because I feel it will respond to the will of the current better if it is unweighted. Further, I never use indicators, I consider them to be good for people who don't know how to watch their line and control slack, however, they will never learn if they use bobbers.
For bones I would not consider using shot for reasons stated, and for other saltwater situations I like to weight the hook if I'm going use weight.
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Old 12-14-2011, 01:25 PM
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I think there is a big difference between using small shot for nymphing on trout streams and throwing an ounce of lead when fishing for steelhead. If there is so much weight that the fly line is no longer being used for it's intended purpose I think it's fair to say it is no longer flyfishing. However, flyfishing in general is and always has been an evolving sport. Had it not been for sinking lines, split shot, quick release indicators, etc, stillwater fishing might not have had the boom it's experienced. All these new techniques improve angler success rates and gain interest.

I like to weight some flies. Dragonfly nymphs, the point fly for two or three fly chironomid set ups, etc. I also like to weight larger stone fly patterns and then crush the lead to flatten the weight. I've never actually gone under water to check it out but I feel that by flattening the weight my fly will wobble versus spin in the current.
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Old 12-15-2011, 06:51 PM
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I have to confess I use split to catch air swimmers.

I'm 60 now and I just don't care what people use anymore to fish with, I don't care as much about sex at 60 as when I cared about people using split shot to fly fish with.

I have been experimenting with a floating line, long leader and weighted fly. Casting 45 or 50 degrees out and down and pulling a big mend upstream then dead drifting fly till line tightens then let it swing as slowly as possible and with success. Now I'm just trying to figure out how to do the same with you know what.
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Old 12-17-2011, 08:58 PM
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I just can't stand having something above the fly that messes with it being an easy cast. If the fly is all that's at the end of your line, it decreases potential tangles by 10,000% versus having something else out there.
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Old 12-17-2011, 09:31 PM
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How about two flies, small weight and two strike indicators with 7X tippet to create potential tangles. Often use that sort of setup in a tailwater fishing situation. It can be messy.
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Old 12-18-2011, 01:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by juro
To avoid diluting the Los Roques thread I've started a new thread.

To me yes, there is a huge difference because the purpose of a barbell weighted fly as I tie them is to invert the hook in very skinny sight fishing situations. The objective is to counter the hook with minimal mass. I also continue to use 811s light wire to further reduce the weight needed. It is a hindrance but a down-point will snag on the bottom just when the fish arrives. Using a split shot would only compound the problem on the flats.

A split shot is almost always used with a bobber (indicator) some are huge orange balls lately, such that the bobber and weight counter each other to effect a float fishing presentation. The weight is not a hindrance but desired.

A weighted fly would not work under a bobber unless it was weighted several times more than the barbell eyes on a bonefish or striper flats fly. I can cast the fly with barbell eyes the full fly line in the right conditions, with no degradation of form. The split shot is most often used to propel the fly between drifts, at least as I have observed.

I have fished many places and many species but do not possess a global view of the sport - it could be that I am only seeing things from my perspective and others are fishing in totally different situations.

I fish saltwater flats, rips and surf for striped bass; tarpon and bonefish; traditional river Spey for steelhead and salmon, and ocean feeding pacific salmon with a rare trout pursuit now and again.

This probably influences and possibly limits my perspective. Again, unless the observer is wearing a badge it doesn't matter what anyone else thinks.

Bumping bottom with an unweighted nymph and a tiny splitshot on fine tippet early in the spring is a deadly and productive method for catching trophy wild Browns on nearby streams. I personally don't need to and have never used a strike indicator but some just can't acquire the required skill or technique and consequently have to use an indicator. The object needless to say is to get the nymph to drift as natural as possible near the bottom where the fish are and in small streams tiny split shot and unweighted nymphs is the most practical way to achieve this.
On the other hand , the purpose I use barbell weighted flies in salt water is not just for inverting the hook to ride point up but just as importantly to sink it to the bottom . If I just want the hook to ride point up, it could easly be achieved by choosing the right materials and strategically applying them in the right place on the hook shank or simply tie bendback style.
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Old 12-19-2011, 08:59 PM
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I personally prefer to weight my flies by wrapping the hook shank with lead wire. I think this makes for a fly that sinks more uniformly, and I also think for fish like bonefish, it makes much less of a "plop" when it hits the water.
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