Opinion poll: Are Striper Stocks down? - Fly Fishing Forum
Stripers and Coastal Gamefish Stripers, Blues, Inshore tuna!

View Poll Results: Overall (Nova Scotia to the Carolinas) Have Striper Population Decreased?
1) Yes, I believe striper population is DOWN 36 64.29%
2) No, I believe the biomass just acted differently 17 30.36%
3) I believe the striper population has increased 1 1.79%
4) I believe there has been no appreciable change 2 3.57%
Voters: 56. You may not vote on this poll

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  #1  
Old 10-25-2008, 10:25 AM
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Opinion poll: Are Striper Stocks down?

After the strangest year in recent memory, what do you think?

(just your anecdotal opinion, of course no one really knows at this point)
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  #2  
Old 10-25-2008, 12:14 PM
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I'm concerned. Fished the Bayside and what worries me is there was a lack of small fish. It could be a couple of things such as the salinity of the water or Global Warming. Yes, I said Global Warming. It sad that this serious subject has taken on a political tone. Perhaps with a new change at the top things will improve .
Often times there was a lack of bait and then there were times when there was plenty of bait but no fish. Just one shore fly guys observations. FishHawk
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  #3  
Old 10-25-2008, 02:19 PM
Paxton Paxton is offline
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To me (and I hope it is right for all of us)....I heard that an RI marine biologist felt that the fish went way off shore due to salinity issues caused by heavy string rains and thus estruaries dumping in our favorite areas. I know that shouldn't affect stripers as they can live in fresh water...but it does effect what they eat.
I observed this season a significant change in bait patterns....I may have missed it, but I never saw squid in the early spring (i heard that squiders had to go 1 to 2 miles offshore to get them).....there was a general absense of bait and on the few occassions that there was bait, i really don't feel that the bass ventured 2 miles to get them......my last trip to Monomoy in early July, there were very few crabs to be seen.............clammers had troble finding clams ( how the heck far can a clam go???)....bunker never materialized.

Any boat fishermen (fisher-persons) I met said that the had banner yr for both size and #'s 2 miles off shore. One guy told me that he spends the first hour netting bait and that for the first yr in 20, he consistently caught up to 5 varieties of bait in each netting...he said that usually it is a single species. "My sonar consitsently lit up with huge schools of bait"

So.....my tentative feeling is that the bass were off shore where all the bait went and stayed there throughout the season.

Wednesday was a banner day in RI (of course I wenrt friday).........reports were that the bait was thousands of anchovies which i believe (may be wrong) are more of an open water bait)....as soon as the silversides returned (the day i went), fishing was spotty for schoolies and the high #'s of bass, including very large ones were gone again.

If not asalinity issue, then the only other thing that i can think of is that for whatever reason, the ocean currents changed. If bass were dwindling, why did the boats fishermen have banner years?

Sorry for the length of this post.

Ron
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  #4  
Old 10-26-2008, 08:31 AM
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Guys - I don't think I ask for too much around here so please vote to increase the effectiveness of this survey. There are notable and concerned people who would be interested in this information behind the scenes.

thanks!
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  #5  
Old 10-26-2008, 09:44 AM
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I voted for number 2.
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  #6  
Old 10-26-2008, 09:48 AM
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I heard all the reports that boat guys were doing very well off shore. As for me being shorebound I had a few good days on the Cape in the spring. I have been all but shut out this fall and late summer. There also have been reports from Canada of stripers farther North then people ever remember. They also had a greater number of small fish.
Larry aka shadfreak
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  #7  
Old 10-26-2008, 10:04 AM
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I don't have an opinion, gut feel or what have you on the question and answers as posed. If forced to vote I'd go with anwser 2. Based on what I've seen I believe we have had a few weak breeding (or survivial) years in succesion. I do hold firmly to the opinions that the seal population is up and the southway closing really sucked.
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  #8  
Old 10-26-2008, 11:01 AM
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I can't make the distinction between different fish and fewer fish based on my experience. It splits the vote if you do not believe it is the same or better. My gut says the answer is 1 and 2, we have fewer fish and they are "different" fish. I voted for number 1.
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  #9  
Old 10-26-2008, 11:27 AM
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Can't really comment as I do not fish for them very often.

However this year (2008) has been the least successful year for me that I can remember.
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  #10  
Old 10-26-2008, 11:32 AM
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I took number 1 because many of my spring time spots had the bait but not the fish that normally inhabit the area(shorebound). I think with the weak recruitment of the Chesapeake stock we didn't see as many of these fish up north beccause they didn't have to migrate for food because of the lower population density. The fish that went north are the fish that stay around all winter- they like cooler water. The ones that migrated in were from the Hudson and were smaller then usual. Of course without the pogies like we've had in the passed few years the stripers were feeding on the anchovies which move faster when they are migrating and they tend not to attract the blues like the p'nutz do.
The population density theory stems fromthe fact that in the BAy the fish stayed on the western side with few on the eastern side even though at times the bait was on the eastern side as well. I also noticed a lack of smaller fish even during times when they should've been in abundance like during the worm swarms and shrimp hatches. It doesn't help if legally you can remove the breeding females from the biomass like they have been doing. Its about time for a change in the way things are done-ie., a slot limit to keep as many females breeding as possible to build up the numbers. Just my $.02 rel1
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  #11  
Old 10-26-2008, 12:18 PM
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1 & 2

I also believe #1 AND #2. I picked #1 since there may be some level of influence that can be brought to it.
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  #12  
Old 10-26-2008, 03:02 PM
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I voted for #1. Can you tell us who these people are? FishHawk
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  #13  
Old 10-26-2008, 04:43 PM
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2.

for the reasons given before - a lot of schoolies on the S shore and bayside, and better fish in the 20"+ on the bayside all season long ....

most bait this year out of the four i've been here too.


Mark
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  #14  
Old 10-26-2008, 04:47 PM
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I like others am mixed between 1 and 2. There were certainly a fair number of bass in Narragansett bay this spring/summer feasting on the pogies. The biomass at Montauk right now is also huge but the fish seem more concentrated in certain locations than in years past which is why I voted 1. I certainly see no good reason not to go back to one fish at 36" or a slot limit with a few trophy tags.

I'm also curious who the inquiring minds are. Just don't see how a few fly fisherman's annecdotal catch summaries add up to anything useful for fisheries management.

Sean
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  #15  
Old 10-27-2008, 07:45 AM
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I pick #2 for allot of the reasons already mentioned. It was my worst season fishing strictly from shore.
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