Call me what you will.... - Fly Fishing Forum
Stripers and Coastal Gamefish Stripers, Blues, Inshore tuna!

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Old 07-10-2006, 04:23 PM
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Call me what you will....

But I wouldn't be caught dead fishing a pink sluggo. Yes I know, open the floodgates whatever.

What has gamefishing come to! I can't even look at them. Worse yet I can't have a striper and a pink sluggo in the same field of vision without thinking something is wrong with that picture.

To each his/her own

Meant Editorially
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Old 07-10-2006, 04:57 PM
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Would that be an aversion to the nexus of multiple non-traditional flyfishing concepts embodied in a single piece of flaccide plastic?

Or, is the color pink the proverbial straw that breaks the camel's back?
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Old 07-10-2006, 05:14 PM
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I used a Pink floating worm freshwater bass fishing for quite a few years...Killer clear water color when sightfishing for cruisers until the tournament armadas caught on and trained all the largemouth in Massachusetts to avoid them! I never use Sluggos when striper fishing, however
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Old 07-10-2006, 05:22 PM
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I think part of this is rooted in my aversion to the pink worm phenomena out west for (gulp) steelhead. Can you imagine fighting a big native steelhead in the emerald flows of a lush rain forest stream with a pink rubber member doinking his cheeks silly as he shakes his head? Thank God it hasn't caught on in the Gaspe or Scotland's famous centuries old fishery. Tweed and pink rubber? The horror of it.
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Old 07-10-2006, 05:42 PM
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You'll like this . . .

although the effect of the 9" worm is diminished because of vertical 'shrinkage'.

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Old 07-10-2006, 05:51 PM
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That fish started out with bright cheeks but ended up red!
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Old 07-10-2006, 06:06 PM
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I am starting to feel the same way about flies with clouser eyes

My kid really likes the pink sluggos though, I try to get him to just stick to the white ones but what can you do...

-sean
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Old 07-10-2006, 06:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sean
I am starting to feel the same way about flies with clouser eyes

-sean
Now that should really put the cat amongst the pigeons I was going to use the "can of worms" analogy but the pun would be unforgiveable.

Juro, you should know that the Tweed has seen it's share of unsportsmanlike behavior over the years. The "Walkerburn Angel" would make any color sluggo look innocent.
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Old 07-10-2006, 06:45 PM
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Actually I used a light red/pink cinder worm imitation fly during a hatch last year. It worked pretty well.
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Old 07-10-2006, 09:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sean
I am starting to feel the same way about flies with clouser eyes
-sean
Well at least weighted eyes serve a purpose, to invert the hook on skinny flats as every bonefisher knows. On the flats the bonefish is the closest cousin of the striper - in terms of behavior.

But those pretty jungle cock eyes and stringy hackles are for fishermen, not the fish - like wearing a tux to a mugging. Stripers are just thick shouldered rugby players of the piscatorial world, lovable thugs, linebackers on a blitz and their brutally frank nature is what I love about them. They are slaves to the beat of the tides and I find no need to glorify things for these bad boys, they are ready to rumble.

However suckering them with a pink rubber phallus is downright demeaning.
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Old 07-10-2006, 09:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by juro
However suckering them with a pink rubber phallus is downright demeaning.
Oh, Juro! I just love it when you talk dirty!
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Old 07-10-2006, 10:45 PM
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Quote:
But those pretty jungle cock eyes and stringy hackles are for fishermen, not the fish
I guess somebody needs to tell the fish

Stripers can be as delicate as a spring creek trout or as voracious as a bluefish. More often than not I see their delicate side, smarter and more discerning in their feeding patterns than I ever thought until I moved here. You just got to seek it out and really get into their environs to see it. They can be maddening at times to figure out but when you do it is worth far more than any blitz fishing I have encountered. That is where the true knowledge lies. Not just throwing a fly into the middle of a feeding frenzy. Not much to learn there.

Every striper loves a big blitz but in my experience that is far from the norm. It aint all about the flats. That is maybe 5% of the habitat a striper lives and feeds in.

They are no more thugs than a bonefish is a glorified sucker.

-sean
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Old 07-11-2006, 04:44 AM
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For me it's the Tube and Worm that gets me. Had a boss who had a lot of money and had to take people out on his boat to get a tax write off. Everyone had to Tube and Worm when you went out with him. Bass ate the Tubes like candy.
The biggest fish caught by the employees was by the company secretary who never fished in her life!!! To top it off they threw the fish away because no one wanted to take it home and eat it. FishHawk
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Old 07-11-2006, 07:13 AM
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Quote:
I guess somebody needs to tell the fish
Yeah, they aren't too trendy

Quote:
Stripers can be as delicate as a spring creek trout or as voracious as a bluefish. More often than not I see their delicate side, smarter and more discerning in their feeding patterns than I ever thought until I moved here. You just got to seek it out and really get into their environs to see it. They can be maddening at times to figure out but when you do it is worth far more than any blitz fishing I have encountered. That is where the true knowledge lies. Not just throwing a fly into the middle of a feeding frenzy. Not much to learn there.
Blind casting with fancy flies is hardly challenging compared to sight fishing on summer flats, I know this is your first year but you should give it a try. Nothing is more challenging, exciting and condusive to big fish in ironic conditions.

First thing I did in 1995 when I moved back was the swing thing with spey gear, floating lines, estuaries but the prominence of schoolies urged me to move on. It just doesn't excite me. The surroundings and the fish themselves urged me to change my tactics. Striper fishing is not a philosophy, it's a great interactive puzzle; a life-long enigma that leaves too much to solve to box oneself in for style points.

But in the end we fish for enjoyment so whatever rocks the boat is the best for each individual.

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Every striper loves a big blitz but in my experience that is far from the norm.
Well that's because you haven't experienced fall yet. You'll see.

Quote:
It aint all about the flats. That is maybe 5% of the habitat a striper lives and feeds in.
That's right it's not all about the flats. Big rips on the fly are a speciality of mine (big girl; south tip rip a couple of my exploits); big surf (developed surf flyrod, migratory techniques etc). I understand the fall blitzes very well and they are a huge part of the scene. I would say that I can cover the majority of striped bass habits with my diverse fly-only approaches perhaps 85% of whats available from shore.

From boats it was too easy to figure out the Billingsgate Shoal and Chatham east fishery on the fly (albeit incredibly productive). Estuary fishing represents an even smaller percentage and produces a smaller average size fish.

And there is so much more to untangle.

I have to argue the 5% flats claim. Throughout history, the striped bass has been captured by their shallow water habits - Massasoit Indians showed the Plymouth settlers how to set tidal traps and it's written that proceeds from sale of striped bass among the plantation helped fund the first American schoolhouse. These traps worked on the principal of fish coming with the tide and the water leaving them behind in the traps.

Certainly not in spring. When I showed you how to dial into the migratory behavior, I am sure you can't deny that the majority of the entire population runs the flats on route. In that case it's more like 85% run the flats on their migration in spring.

As your first striper fall comes, you will learn that blitzing IS the norm in autumn in fact where the migration follows the flats in spring it follows the blitzes in fall. You will have a hard time denying that 85% or more are in blitz/on blitz/off behavior for the southward push in October.

A significant percentage of the striped bass population does indeed roam the open seas (e.g. Stellwagon) in a semi-pelagic manner and the largest fish seem to gravitate toward structures that neither you or I could exploit with fly rods but on rare occasions without a boat maybe - but for the most part stripers are shoreline inhabitants and when the tide comes or when currents form rips they are feeding there. I am happy with shots at 40" plus fish all year and I get them in certain places thus I lean that way.

In reality stripers feeding in stationed position is a much smaller behavioral niche, stripers don't sit too often in one spot as every sight fisher knows. I would wager that those fish are moving but appear to be stationed in the dark.

Quote:
They are no more thugs than a bonefish is a glorified sucker.
Tell that to the bunker with the broken back. Big bass eat their young, had a big cow grab a schoolie last weekend in fact. Sure ain't trout.

Ahh bonefishing... I'll listen after you've tried it once or twice. I think you'll see the parallel - their blood gets to boiling to the beat of the tides and that gets into your own blood. It's not about how fancy you fish, but how well you hear that rhythm. It doesn't try to fit the human perspective into the fishing, but instead the human has to fit into the scene.

You can say I am up my kazoo all you want and I won't deny it but to say my pursuit of striped bass is practiced in a limited manner is simply wrong, especially in comparison to sippy trout techniques.
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Old 07-11-2006, 08:46 AM
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Hmm, a little hostile , are we not? I moved here last Septemeber. I think that is fall and I caught a good number fo estuary fish on the backside of napatree last year who were not blitzing. Blitzing may be the biggest game in town but not the only one.

I have bonefished the keys a couple times. They are not stripers and rely much more on flats for food than a striper has to.

Flat wings have been around at least 20 years, not really a trend and they do work as do small shrimp and silverside flies.

Running the beaches and the flats are not the same thing. Sure those migratory fish run up and down but mainly on the outside , and most of the fish actually migrate a little farther offshore. It may be site casting at times but it is not flats fishing. No way is it 85%, maybe %.05. No one ever sees all those big fish that fill up the cape cod bay. If they did south beach would be wall to wall keepers in the spring but it is not. A lot of those bigger fish seem to migrate a little farther offshore.

Just because you caught schoolies in the estuaries does not mean everyone does. You say it is a lifetime pursuit , well it is a little presumptious to say only schoolies are in estuaries when you have only did it one year. Just saying it is all blind casting proves you do not know much about it at all. The majority of the time you know exactly where the fish is feeding and are bringing the fly to them. Go spend an evening down to a bridge and you can watch the same fish hold in the current and feed. They move up and down as needed due to tidal height but will pick stations and stay in them as long as possible to feed. The food is being brought to them , there is no need to chase it. If you are going to belittle my methods at least know something about it.

Fish move on the flats cause they have to hunt and they are vulnerable. How many times have you told me stories of fish holding and the backside of sand bars waiting for bait to be washed over. Sounds like stationary feeding to me....

What about Phils fish down in CT, they sound pretty big and it is an estuary type environ. Stripers like shad, shad like estuaries....I have not found little fish = estuaries to be the case any more than the schoolies you guys catch on the flats most of the time.

I have not seen any of your big fish pictures from the flats except a 2 paragraph essay about a 33 inch fish. I have not seem or heard of many 40 inch fish caught on the fly on monomoy, only a few on the 40 inch club this year. You say you get lots of shots, where are the fish? Belittingly my methods are fine if you can show me there is something better down in monomoy. Big fish are not the norm no matter where you fish from the shore. The only way to really do the big fish thing all the time is boat fishing and even then it is not a sure thing.

Do not get me wrong , I really like monomoy. It is a beautiful place to fish and I love my time there. However it truly is only a small part of the stripers puzzle, which is all I am trying to say.

It just raises my hackles that instead of learning something you choose to attack and belittle others.

Quote:
It's not about how fancy you fish, but how well you hear that rhythm. It doesn't try to fit the human perspective into the fishing, but instead the human has to fit into the scene.
And that is my point. Sounds to me your cd player is stuck on repeat so you are only hearing one rythm. Go out and explore a little and learn some new things. It may just make you a better fisherman and appreciate the fullness of striper fishing.

-sean
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