nymphs & flys for brookies - Fly Fishing Forum
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Old 04-26-2005, 03:46 PM
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nymphs & flys for brookies

will be fishing nymphs and wet flys for brookies in a couple weeks for the first time. just wondering what i should look for when choosing my colors and paterns. what works for you? and what might work for me. Thanks.

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Old 04-26-2005, 04:03 PM
carbon1986 carbon1986 is offline
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From what I've observed of brookies here in Iowa, they are carnivores so don't rule out a streamer. They have a large jaw in comparison to other trout so I usually seem to catch them on larger flies than a rainbow of similar size, granted the brooks aren't usually as large. They seem to like red and white a lot (preditory colors) as well as black leech patterns. For nymphs I'd just use the standard patterns for the stream you fish, but for wets I'd go with a royal coachman or another bright pattern like that. And don't forget to bring a few streamers along.
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Old 04-26-2005, 09:12 PM
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where are you fishing? it's says you're from canada...
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Old 04-26-2005, 09:28 PM
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massfly, i will be doing pretty much all of my fly fishing in brooks and streams that flow into the Miramichi river system.
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Old 04-26-2005, 11:05 PM
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well, brook trout notoriously are not picky eaters. i would imagine any nymph, wetfly, streamer combination would probably work. flashy as carbon mentioned might be the way to go...

in general here are some helpful flies:

bead head zug bug
bead head hairs ear wet fly
mickey finn
wooley bugger with some flash

depending how big the brook trout get you might even have to use leader and tippet as big as 3x. i know that's what they use in Maine as the brook trout can reach considerable size.
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Old 04-27-2005, 07:25 AM
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A Hornberg with lemon malard flank wings and a Henryville Special are my go to flys for brook trout. The Hornberg can be fished wet or dry. A Royal Wulff and a wake are deadly too. In fact dragging your fly and causing a wake is a very effective method of drawing the attention of hungry brookies. I can't count the number of brookies I've hooked dragging my fly to prepare to cast again only to have a brookie whack my fly. I've shot many a fingerling yahoo square tail into the bushes because of poor timing on their part for taking my fly as I lifted my line off the water to back cast. They are very opportunistic and much less fussy- in general- than other trouts. Maybe because the are of the Char family which in most of their ranges have shorter open water seasons forcing a more aggressive demeanor.

I also have good luck with small, # 12- #16, bead head nymphs, Pheasant Tails and Gold Head Hair's Ear drifted into pocket water and small plunge pools. Much early stream fishing I do is in brooks you can hop across in at most three or four steps. As spring moves toward summer I like to dress a Hornberg and float it dry and get good results. I also like a Goddard Caddis, it is a large meal, floats high and stays dry. We get some pretty outrageous tiger caddis hatches late May and into mid June when the Goddard is a very productive fly. I personally don't do as much streamer fishing as I used to except when trolling but a Black Nosed Dace, Grey Ghost, Black Ghost, and Mickey Finn are always good go to streamers if they aren't taking on the surface.

Most of these flys will work equally well on brookie ponds too. If you catch it right, at least here in Maine, from around mid-June to early July- depending on weather and what part of the state you're fishing- The Green Drake can be a blast. These large mayflies make brookies crazy and feed with abandon in mud bottom brookie ponds and slower parts of rivers.

Just keep in mind these are a very aggressive species of fish and so matching closely and delicate presentations aren't as necessary with brookies as with other trout. Get close to the size and silouette of the bugs you see. Take care- don't be an oaf and thump along the banks or cast shadows on the pools and you will find brook trout to be pretty agreable to much of what you present to them.

You have some monster brookies up your way. Several years ago I caught an 18"er in the St. John River in Alagash, Maine up on the Canadian border that had a mouse or a vole in it's stomach so don't forget about a deer hair mouse pattern. Cast one of those cross current swinging it down and making a wake as you strip it back upstream and you may be in for the brookie of a lifetime. They just can't lay off a big meal. When I caught this one it couldn't have been hungry it just couldn't pass up dessert.

Best of Luck.
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Last edited by Chris; 04-27-2005 at 07:59 AM.
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Old 04-27-2005, 07:41 AM
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Jim Miller Jim Miller is offline
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Our Adirondack brookies are not too picky. All the flies mentioned will work. heck a #14 hares ear will work all day.
Don't forget to bend over those hook barbs for a easy release. The brookies are aggressive and can take a fly deep.
They sure are beautiful fish!
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