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Old 07-21-2004, 11:41 AM
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Flyfishing and camping

Hi All,
At the conclusion of the Summer, Denise and I are going to start taking some long-awaited camping trips into upstate NY, where we'll be doing some fishing for the local fare. The question I have is related to camping, and hopefully some of you guys that do this on a regular basis can help me out: for the purpose of cooking food or keeping warm, are you allowed to build a fire? I figure that this is an absurd question, but growing up out West I don't remember ever not being able to build a fire at the campsite, but out on the East Coast I've seen a couple of places where you have to use a small stove, which I can understand from a safety aspect but seems like it would be a large pain in the @$$ to mess with. Any information would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 07-21-2004, 11:47 AM
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Fire building is different from state to state, and within each state it can vary from campsite to campsite. Some allow it, and some just simply don't. The best bet is to check with the campsite/park you'll be staying at ahead of time.

How's that for a safe answer?
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Old 07-21-2004, 11:57 AM
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Wonderful. I figured that such was the case. Thanks...
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Old 07-21-2004, 12:47 PM
BigDave BigDave is offline
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It's OK in MA at most places I have camped. If trout fishing is your game Mohawk Park Campground is right on a prime stretch of the Deerfield in Charlemont MA. Not primitive camping...but very good fishing in the fall.

Plus there is a bar there which is always a plus
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Old 07-21-2004, 02:30 PM
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If it is an established campground I can all but guarantee a permissable fire in a provided fire pit. Allways check though.
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Old 07-21-2004, 02:38 PM
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Part of the camping will be "remote" (as in, paddle canoe down stream or across lake or pond and set up tent), so again it looks like I'll be checking in with the forest management people in those instances. I like to be in the more primitive sections, honestly; camping among 20 other people in a small area is hardly my idea of a nature retreat. Especially with living in NYC (Bronx, to be more precise), it's nice to get away from the other bipeds!
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Old 07-21-2004, 03:09 PM
dewey dewey is offline
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yeah - you are going to have to check...
Let me suggest that, for your backwoods camping you bring a small stove, such as a whisperlite, for cooking. They are far more efficient than a campfire for producing a hot meal.
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Old 07-21-2004, 03:13 PM
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Thanks dewey, that was going to be my next question (which stoves do you campers recommend).
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Old 07-21-2004, 03:53 PM
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Are these hike in Camp sites or drive up campgrounds you are referring to. In my experience if they are hike in trails you will want different (light) equipement and most likely no fires will be allowed. Vice versa for the drive up spots.

Sean
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Old 07-21-2004, 04:05 PM
BigDave BigDave is offline
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I give the Whisperlite 2 thumbs up. They are tiny when folded up and heat a gallon of water ridiculously fast.

Just be careful when you light it...almost lost a couple of eyebrows lighting one last year
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Old 07-21-2004, 04:05 PM
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These are places accessible by hiking trails, nothing planned that could be reached by a car. That's the intention, at least. As I say, I hope that most of the camping we do is via canoe.
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Old 07-21-2004, 04:05 PM
flytyer flytyer is offline
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Chris,

I used to camp along the upper Delaware quite often during September when I still lived in Northeast PA. There are not that many folks out camping after Labor Day so most campgrounds are pretty deserted. And the fishing was grand.

I have had a 2-burner Coleman gasoline stove for 27 years and have had no problems with it whatsoever. And you don't have to use Coleman gas to fuel them, you can use regular unleaded from the local gas pump. I think they sell for about $55.00 these days. When I got mine, I paid about $20.00 for it.

I would avoid the propane powered stoves because the small propane tanks don't last very long and several of them weigh more than a gallon or two of gasoline. Also, the gas stoves produce more heat than the propane ones.

Coleman also makes the Peak 1 and Peak 2 single burner gas stoves, which are very nice if space is at a premium. These were made for backpakers. The one thing to keep in mind about the small Coleman Peak 1 or 2 stoves is you can only heat one thing at a time on them and their fuel tank needs to be re-filled more often than the 2-burner gasoline stoves.
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Old 07-21-2004, 06:56 PM
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I camped with my wife a lot when we were engaged, then when we were married with kids. All I can say now is that none of them will ever camp again

Here's what I would offer:
  • Get the primitive camping in now while you can, later on camping will require hot showers and electricity for hair dryers
  • Never stay in a hotel before you pitch the tent on the first night, no matter how late it gets - the comparison will not survive the wife and kids judgement. Stay in a hotel on the LAST night and everyone will remember how nice of a camping trip it was after showering and watching TV before the ride back home
  • Don't pour bacon grease into the fire pit unless you want to tell a little "white lie" to your wife that the black bear at the site that night was really a newfoundland dog sniffing around

Seriously, camping has been a source of great enjoyment for our family over the years and I hope you guys have a great trip!
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Old 07-22-2004, 03:12 PM
kennebecfly kennebecfly is offline
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I do alot of camping in nortern maine, Most at what the state calls "unimpproved sites"which means there is no faciltys all are owed by large paper co.s. Some are fire permit sites if that is the case you must stop at a permit box and fill out a card that tells which site you are at and length of stay. A small price to pay(free) to avoid a steep fine. Fire is not as important to me as is was,its nice for the light and warmth but I stopped cooking on it a long time ago it just makes a mess of your cooking uttensils and such. I use a colman gas stove for cooking and do not have to worry about permits or sooty dishes
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Old 08-31-2004, 10:17 AM
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Fires are OK in the Adirondacks

Looks like you're headed (have headed?) to the Adirondacks in NY state. In my experience, fires are OK here, even in the backcountry. I realize that this thread is a month old, but I figured I'd chip in my two cents for future reference.

A quick search on the Internet shows that campfires are permissible for cooking, warmth, or "smudge" as outlined in the state environmental regulations on the official NY state web site.

http://www.dec.state.ny.us/website/regs/part190a.html

190.1 Fire

a. No fires are permitted except for cooking, warmth or smudge. No fire shall be lit until all flammable material has been removed from its perimeter as is necessary to prevent its spread. No fires shall be left unattended until extinguished.

b. No person shall deposit lighted matches, cigars, cigarettes or other burning tobacco where they will cause fire.

c. No wood, except from dead and down trees or from supplies furnished by the department, shall be used for fuel.


Now, if someone can tell me what 'smudge' is...
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