Back in the swing of things - Fly Fishing Forum
Stripers and Coastal Gamefish Stripers, Blues, Inshore tuna!

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Old 09-16-2003, 04:23 PM
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flyfisha1 flyfisha1 is offline
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Back in the swing of things

Well, after a lengthy hiatus from visiting the boards and doing any fishing, I'm happy to say that I'm back and doing both. Got divorced in July (no, not because the ex thought I had too many fly rods, which of course we all know is impossible... right Striblue?), moved job and location to the Bronx (yes, that's right). I'm slowly getting everything settled in and actually spent the last two weekends on the Jersey shore (LBI) chasing bluefish. Only one taker, but one's better than none. One great aspect of being back in the Northeast (grew up in South Jersey) is that I can finally get to meet all of the guys that I've spoken to on the forum, and hopefully we can wet a line at some point. Looking forward to the Fall migration at Montauk, I can tell you that! Also, it's nice to be back in an area where the trout fishing is actually enjoyable. So I'm in New York... great food, back among my friends and family, and have access to the entire Northeastern seaboard. It's great to be back up here!
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Old 09-16-2003, 04:25 PM
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juro juro is offline
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Welcome back!
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Old 09-16-2003, 05:18 PM
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striblue striblue is offline
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Yes...Welcome back and here is a picture to help you get back in the swing of things...
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Old 09-16-2003, 08:21 PM
mikez mikez is offline
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Welcome back!
You had me worried there for awhile. You kinda disappeared in the middle of a PM and I haven't seen nor heard anything since.

Maybe you should consider a Rhode Trip! If we get a break between storms, the south coast of RI is gonna explode in bass and blues within the next few weeks.

Hmmm, now that I think about it, the south Jersey shore has some pretty good action in November, doesn't it?...
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Old 09-17-2003, 08:35 AM
steelheadmike steelheadmike is offline
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Welcome

Welcome Back! ... I'm not far from the Boogie Down so give me a hollar if you want to head out. Have boat will travel.
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Old 09-17-2003, 08:43 AM
John Desjardins John Desjardins is offline
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Welcome back Chris, I'd been wondering what happened to you.
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Old 09-17-2003, 10:33 AM
DFix DFix is offline
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Hi Chris. I didn't have any real worries. Welcome back.
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Old 09-17-2003, 09:18 PM
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flyfisha1 flyfisha1 is offline
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Hi Guys
Thanks for your responses and kind words, I appreciate it! Not to worry, we'll be "hooking up" for fish at some point; as soon as I get everything situated with the big move I'll be able to spend more time pursuing our finned-friends. Hopefully I'll be able to hit the shores and streams of Long Island in the next few weeks, then I'm looking at fishing the area up around the Delaware water gap.

On a related note, over the Winter I'll be building a rod for general saltwater use, and I'd like to get the details ironed out now for the kind gift-giver that will be supplying the materials. I'll be fishing from shore nearly 100% of the time, going for all of our in-shore gamefish. I typically fish patterns tied on size 2/0 or smaller, and want something that won't tire my arm excessively from casting alone. So my question is, 8-wt., 9-wt., or 10-wt.? My preliminary desire is for the 8-wt., though some more experienced guys might say it's not strong enough to subdue fish quickly. Let me also say that most of the fish I catch are less than 15-lbs., so I question whether a heavier outfit than an 8-wt. is truly needed. Additionally, I plan to hit the Salmon River in future for steelhead, and would like the rod to be useful for that fishery, also. Your thoughts, please.

Also, has anyone looked into the new TFO series of rods with Lefty's name on them?

Last edited by flyfisha1; 09-17-2003 at 09:48 PM.
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Old 09-18-2003, 05:14 AM
FishHawk FishHawk is offline
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Lefty take a look at the Sage 10' for 8 wt XP rod. I build all of my rods and this one looks like a good choice . I am leaning in this direction. It will handle a 9 wt line without a problem. The 10 foot length has many advantages for fishing the surf and flats. For a reel seat REC is the best. Hope this helps.
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Old 09-18-2003, 05:19 AM
FishHawk FishHawk is offline
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Sorry Chris called you Lefty. Had Lefty on the brain. The TFO rods are good for the money. FishHawk
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Old 09-18-2003, 09:44 AM
2HandTheSalt 2HandTheSalt is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by flyfisha1
Hi Guys
Thanks for your responses and kind words, I appreciate it! Not to worry, we'll be "hooking up" for fish at some point; as soon as I get everything situated with the big move I'll be able to spend more time pursuing our finned-friends. Hopefully I'll be able to hit the shores and streams of Long Island in the next few weeks, then I'm looking at fishing the area up around the Delaware water gap.

On a related note, over the Winter I'll be building a rod for general saltwater use, and I'd like to get the details ironed out now for the kind gift-giver that will be supplying the materials. I'll be fishing from shore nearly 100% of the time, going for all of our in-shore gamefish. I typically fish patterns tied on size 2/0 or smaller, and want something that won't tire my arm excessively from casting alone. So my question is, 8-wt., 9-wt., or 10-wt.? My preliminary desire is for the 8-wt., though some more experienced guys might say it's not strong enough to subdue fish quickly. Let me also say that most of the fish I catch are less than 15-lbs., so I question whether a heavier outfit than an 8-wt. is truly needed. Additionally, I plan to hit the Salmon River in future for steelhead, and would like the rod to be useful for that fishery, also. Your thoughts, please.

Also, has anyone looked into the new TFO series of rods with Lefty's name on them?
Just my personal opinions:

I believe that your line-weight should be dictated by your maximum fly size, tempered with the size and strength of the fish you are pursuing.

I personally prefer a 9-weight for flies to 2/0, finding most of them a bit much for an 8-weight, but others may disagree.

IMHO A 10' one-handed fly rod is about the worst recommendation you could make for someone who wants a rod that can be cast all day without tiring. Have you ever cast one of those things? Even most pro tournament casters will tell you that it is extremely difficult to cast a one-hander of much more than 9'6" in length.

I agree that there are distinct advantages to longer rods int eh surf, but would recommend that if you think you want a really long one-hander, that you give one a good workout for several hous before making such a commitment.

Lastly, I have the Lefty Kreh TiCr Temple Fork rods in 8,9 & 10-weight. They are here on Cape Cod and available for anyone that would like to try them. There might be an answer for you there as the 8-weight will easily handle an eight or nine-weight line. You could use an eight for smaller flies on the flats, or switch to a number nine for bigger flies.

Plus, the rod is so inexpensive, you can afford some extra lines.
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Old 09-18-2003, 10:05 AM
mikez mikez is offline
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IMO, the blanks they have out today are so light but robust, I'd lean toward a larger rather than smaller size. If you're on the water undergunned [wind, fly size, fish size] you're SOL. If your rod is maybe one size bigger than you thought you'd need, well, your arm will strengthen up mighty fast with regular use.

You can't beat spending a day at a show casting various rods and lines. Some good shops will take you out in the parking lot, but they rarely have as wide a selection. Once you get a feel for the different blanks [don't go by size rating alone, they vary] and get the specs, you can choose from there.

Caveat: This from the guy who only owns one saltwater rod, the same Sage I got close to 15 years ago [been replaced by Sage once]. Which brings up another point; do blanks come with lifetime warrenties? Almost all reputable brands of rods do these days, you might consider if the few bucks you save is worth passing up that all important warrenty. But I don't know, maybe blanks do have it?
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Old 09-18-2003, 04:55 PM
FishHawk FishHawk is offline
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Well Chris . I guess I gave you some bad advice about the 10" rod. I have a 9 6" for 9 wt Sage RPl and have no trouble casting it all day. I thought the 10" rod would work much better. As I posted above I was leaning towards the 10" rod. Will have to rethink this one. FishHawk
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  #14  
Old 09-18-2003, 09:01 PM
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juro juro is offline
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IMHO... and opinions are like you-know-whats we all have one...

What tires out the caster is a rod that does not do the work for you. Stiff rods require that the user does the work to push the line around because the rod does not deflect and recoil on his behalf. Soft rods become too loaded to deliver the power into the loop of the cast in either direction. Both are more work than necessary.

The best rods have just enough give and just enough punch when you drive them hard, and some power in reserve for when you need a little extra. A good rod is only as good as the line you choose, and when you have a match you should be able to ease off your power stroke and it will feel like it's casting itself just on timing alone for full fishing distances. For me the discontinued RPLXi was such a rod.

Consider a headwind situation. It seems the first thing people do is cast harder and whip the rod faster to get the fly into the wind. The whipping sound of the line becomes louder, yet the fly does not seem to travel far. I've found that when the caster uses a very stiff rod it becomes harder to get the line into the wind - because the line's dynamic characteristics of rolling energy from the load in the blank into the line progressively forward in the form of a loop are over-driven and too turbulent to get the job done. The power is shocked into the line, not smoothly and wholly transferred into it.

I have cast more successfully in strong headwinds by easing off and focusing on whether the rod loads fully or not, and by trying to transfer every bit of the bend in the rod into a tighter loop than by trying to force it thru the wind with arm strength.

Likewise, a rod and line that promotes a smooth and fully loaded rhythm of bending and straightening lets an angler cast all day without fatigue.

For striper flyfishing I believe the 9wt is the best all around. An 8wt is better for steelhead because you are not dealing with ocean conditions and there is more finesse involved with fishing rivers. Line management is critical in steelheading but you'll hardly ever use a mend in striper fishing. If you forced me to suggest one rod on the spot I would recommend the Sage VPS 9' 6" 8wt for a great steelhead rod that can do general purpose striper fishing in estuaries and calmer conditions if you care more about your steelhead trips, the old RPLXi 9ft 9wt if you care more about your striper trips. You can find them cheap right now.

If you really want to experience low-impact flyfishing with even lines to 12wt, try a two-handed flyrod. With a little practice, I can now cast a 12wt all day with less fatigue than if I were fishing a 7wt. You bet I can throw some huge flies, and it's pleasant and fun to cast with two hands especially in surf conditions on the beach.

Here's why:

- the "beach style cast" that these rods are designed to make involves only one backcast and reaches approx 100-120 feet per cast within 3-4 seconds so you're spending very little time casting and lots of time fishing.

- a crosswind does not require that you cast backwards, just reach over the other shoulder and drive the line with two hands for distance using one backcast, approx 90-100 feet for me now after a little practice. We are talking HOWLING cross wind conditons as well, the kind that sends most flyrodders home. This is a huge advantage for me as a flats hunter because I never have to turn my head from the fish to cast far enough to reach them.

- even when stripping a one-handed retrieve, the armpit can hold the lower handle to take the weight off the wrist thru the day. Two-handed strip no problem at all and the reel stays over the basket.

- fighting big fish is done with the lower handle braced lengthwise against the forearm or the butt rested on the hip so the wrist does not get trashed, plus the rods are far more powerful than single handers despite requiring less effort thru the day. They call those little single hand mini-butts fighting butts? Let me show you a real fighting butt!

Whats the downside to two-handers? Not much with respect to the benefits, but it does take a little practice to reap the rewards. Although it's fundamentally the same thing as single handed casting, putting both hands to the task feels different at first and you must acquire the skills to harness all that power to go where you need it. Not nearly as much of a learning curve as spey casting though!

.02
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  #15  
Old 09-18-2003, 10:02 PM
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flyfisha1 flyfisha1 is offline
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Thanks for all of the feedback. I had at one time considered building an 8-wt. 10' rod, however it was one-handed. I like the idea of being able to fish in adverse conditions and toss copious lengths of line in normal ones (with practice, of course). So, Juro, I'd still like to build the rod, rather than buy it, as it's a good Winter project. I have no idea at the present time if I'm going to be using the rod more for salmon/steelhead or the in-shore marine fishery, so the issue of 8-wt. vs. 9-wt. is kind of tough to nail down. I think that I'd like to go with an 8-wt. stick if for nothing more than having more sport when I chase the freshwater fish. So all of this taken into consideration, can you, or some of the other guys with two-hander experience, recommend a good blank?
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