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Old 12-16-2004, 09:42 PM
h2o h2o is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: My "home waters" really belong to the beavers........and they let me know it now and then !
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peter-s-c
Well, perhaps you need some time on the water with one of the smaller two-handers as you might be surprised. It's not just backcast room -- easy casting distance can also be handy. And don't forget that the longer the rod, the more advantage the fish has, so don't worry about overpowering fish. These rods offer greater line control, cast all day with no strain, large fishing range, handle heavy tips and large flies, plus you can cast for distance with very little room when you need to. Plus when you want to go back to nymphs and indicator, the smaller two-handers work nicer for this job than most single handers. Casting a weighted fly, BB shot, and a bobber is way easier using a spey cast with a small two-hander.

Check the "Niagara River, Skagit" thread here and see the photo of my casting position. I was hitting 80 footers from this vantage point and not putting any line over the bank.

You can also use two-handers to advantage in skinny water where there are obstructions all around you, yet the rod lets you pop out short casts using nothing but the tip and exposing no line to the mess around you. Lastly, you have a practical fishing tool for managing casting from a bank with minimum backcast room. I used to have six single-handers from 7 wt. to 10 wt. but now I only have two and both of them are in a "backup" role.


Hey Peter, ahhh a friendly little debate.
"easy casting distance can also be handy" I don't have distance cast much over 70' to make. Most are 30' - 60' or less.
"And don't forget that the longer the rod, the more advantage the fish has. True but those rods have some huge butt diameters & powers taking much of the feel of fighting out of it. A 7 wt. spey certainly has much more power that a 9' 6" 7 wt. any way you look at it.
"handle heavy tips and large flies" I don't care for shooting head type tips (heavy) in river fishing unless I am striping streamers for Trout from the bow of a drift boat. I don't use "large fly's" often ...........mostly sz. 6 some 4's. Single handed rods handle large fly's too................for what it's worth, come Pike fishing with me (grin) The line carrys the fly............rod has little to do with it. A 7 wt. spey rod casts large fly's well because it isn't a "real" 7 wt.
"These rods offer greater line control"..........true, if you commonly have 70' or more of line out and need it.
"cast all day with no strain".............it's the tech............same with a single hand. Good casters fish all day with either.
"plus you can cast for distance with very little room when you need to". Just not needed where I fish.
"Plus when you want to go back to nymphs and indicator, the smaller two-handers work nicer for this job than most single handers. Casting a weighted fly, BB shot, and a bobber is way easier using a spey cast with a small two-hander." No question they make a great float & fly rod but, I rarely do that the last few years................maybe once or twice a year out of fish once or twice a week most the year.
Check the "Niagara River, Skagit" thread here and see the photo of my casting position. I was hitting 80 footers from this vantage point and not putting any line over the bank. The Niagara is the type of river spey rods were made for........................never fished it. If I did on a regular basis I would probably get a spey rod (grin)
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