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-   -   Chasing GL Chinook with a spey rod (http://www.flyfishingforum.com/flytalk4/showthread.php?t=9443)

peter-s-c 01-24-2003 06:18 PM

Chasing GL Chinook with a spey rod
 
Chinook fly fishing in this neck-of-the-woods is usually done with a single hander - sight fishing for them on the smaller rivers. Anyone who has fished for them knows that they can be notoriously unpredictable about taking a fly and sometimes many passes are required before a strike can be coaxed out of one.

This mitigates against using a spey rod and fishing blind for you're likely only to pick up the odd aggressive fish. The advantage of the spey rod would be to reach fish in far lies that haven't be pestered by hordes of other anglers. It also would let me get away from the heavily fished waters.

So, has anyone here been successful picking up chinook when fishing blind with a spey rod?

My 11 wt. would be ideal for this but before I spend some more money on lines, etc. I'd like to be reasonably comfortable with the notion that I'm not wasting my time.

BTW fresh, wild chinook in the Saugeen fight way better than their southern, stocked counterparts and they can still be bright 70 miles upstream. (see my avatar).

pmflyfisher 01-24-2003 06:45 PM

For 23 years blind swinging nymphs, streamers, and egg flies using single hander 9 and 10 weights. Especially if they are fresh from the lake they will take when holding in the pools. Hit it right and you will think you are in Alaska, I am not kidding.

Good luck

PM Out

P.S. Make sure you bring band aids for your bloody knuckles and hands trying to palm the fly spool rim on the long runs. :chuckle:

Greg Pavlov 01-24-2003 06:57 PM

Most of the chinook fishing I've seen has been blind, a fair amount of it at night. It does tend to be quite inconsistent.

Do you think that you need the 11 wt ? Wouldn't your 8 or
9 be sufficient ?

peter-s-c 01-24-2003 06:58 PM

See, I've been having these daydreams about the lower Saugeen. At Dennys Dam, hundreds of anglers line the banks flogging the water for anything with scales, but if you're willing to walk, you can go downstream and fished relatively untouched waters. There are some great pools downstream and I have this little daydream of hooking a 40 pounder Ford fender of a fish on the end of the 11 wt. in one of them. The fish in these pools will have been unmolested and in a fiesty mood, fresh from the lake.

About the knuckles - I prefer to use the drag knob. :hehe:

For the record, I'm watching ebay for a Redington AL 13/14 that I'll spool up with an Airflo Delta Traditional multi-tip, when it hits these shores. My Lamson Velocity 4s are fine for shooting heads on the 11 wt. but they don't have the capacity for a long bellied line plus a decent amount of backing. I'm planning on needing the backing.

peter-s-c 01-24-2003 07:05 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Greg Pavlov
Do you think that you need the 11 wt ? Wouldn't your 8 or
9 be sufficient ?

It's a question of distance, current strength, and size potential of some of the fish. I've landed nice chinook on 7 wts. but most of those were lazy stockers on the Credit. I've landed a few dozen chinook on the Saugeen and they like to run. You should've seen the eyeballs on the Pirate when he had that little 8 lb. chinook peel off all of his line and over 100 yards of backing, during our Saugeen drift trip.

The lower river is very wide in spots and I want to run some flies far out in the deep middle where the float rodders don't go. The 11 wt. will let me do that more consistently with less effort. I'll probably bring the 9 wt. along as backup though.

It's a big river, they're big fish, why not use a big rod? :D

peter-s-c 01-24-2003 07:47 PM

BTW. you guys talked me into it. Though I've hooked hundreds over the years, I've hooked a grand total of one when fishing blind.

There's this big chute on the Saugeen where no one can reach the middle of the tailout. No one without a big spey rod, that is. :devil:

Greg Pavlov 01-24-2003 08:14 PM

Peter debates:

>For the record, I'm watching ebay for a Redington AL 13/14 that
>I'll spool up with an Airflo Delta Traditional multi-tip, when it hits
>these shores.

I believe that there have been a few within the past week or so. I was surprised by how cheaply one went.

>It's a big river, they're big fish, why not use a big rod?

I'm just trying to save you some money :rolleyes:

>BTW. you guys talked me into it.

Ah, I see that you've won the debate...

peter-s-c 01-24-2003 08:38 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Greg Pavlov
Peter debates:


>It's a big river, they're big fish, why not use a big rod?

I'm just trying to save you some money :rolleyes:

>BTW. you guys talked me into it.

Ah, I see that you've won the debate...


Save money? In this business? Why start now? :confused: I thought we were supposed to come up with creative reasons for spending it. Remember the Golf Gambit?

Oh, and the debate? Yup I won and you get all the credit. :D


Wanna do Saugeen in September?

removed_by_request 01-25-2003 08:54 AM

Chased them with a 9w 14' Spey a few times. They are tough mothers.

I imagine an 11w would be the ideal rod, you could give them a bit more stick with it.

Greg Pavlov 01-25-2003 08:58 AM

> Remember the Golf Gambit?

Oh yeah, I remember it. I was going to try the same thing, but decided that my wife was *not* going to believe that I needed a motorcycle to go fishing.

> Wanna do Saugeen in September?

Most definitely !!

dansteelieman 01-25-2003 10:03 AM

well....
 
I would be fine with an 8wt. My buddy fished the Saugeen and did perfectly fine with an 8wt rod. It is all about fighting the fish, if you fight them right....you can do ok!

Hell, I use my 5wt for steelhead, and might take a look at that sage for steelhead exclusivly!

silverdoc 01-25-2003 10:57 AM

blind casting for chinnies
 
Peter;
I'll claim I'm fishing steelies or browns, but chinooks are fairly regular "customers". By staying away from the redds, I think we're more likely to hit unmolested fish that are willing to grab.
This image is a bit over 30Kb., so instead of attaching it, just paste this link into your browser:
http://www.silverdoctor.net/jpg_images/spey_chinook.jpg
So, when's the best time for those wild saugeen fish?:D

removed_by_request 01-25-2003 11:15 AM

Hopefully during the Spey Clave.

pmflyfisher 01-25-2003 11:54 AM

The most rod I have ever used for them is a 10 weight 9.5 foot fenwick glass which I built just for the kings. For the fresh 15-20 pounders using 15-20 lb test leaders it was sometimes not enough.

This was primarily on narrower rivers though with our omnipresent log jams in every hole and bend pool.

Its amazing what small caddis, stone, and hex nymphs they will take at times when nothing else works. Size 6-8s. Many times it is the hook which fails via bending due to the immense pressure you can place on them with a 10 weight and 15-20 lb test leader.

I don't care if I land them, so losing them is not an issue. Caught and landed enough of them over the years.

Now everything goes back.

PM Out

removed_by_request 01-25-2003 12:05 PM

15-20# leader, I imagine the hooks pull flat. Especially Maxima, you could scale sears tower with that stuff.

Don't go heavier than 10# maxima, I feel the thicker the leader the less fish (Kings) you hit. They attack the nymphs and caddis out of reflex. Imagine all those river years eating bugs, grubs and your smaller brothers.


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