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-   -   Exploring the ocean salmon fishery (http://www.flyfishingforum.com/flytalk4/showthread.php?t=3692)

Newsflash 11-25-2001 05:36 PM

Exploring the ocean salmon fishery
 
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In the weeks to come, we'll be bringing the awesome ocean salmon flyfishing scene into focus. We'll discuss techniques, gear, and organize some sorties to the salt. If you're into it, speak up and let us know - your knowledge is appreciated in this relatively new frontier.

saltRon 11-27-2001 06:59 PM

Ocean Salmon fisherey
 
Hey Newsflash Where are your home waters on a day by day basis? We need a little orginization On the west Coast with Salt Chuck fisherey . It is a bit difficult to know who or where the members on the coast [PNW] are located when the home waters on the profile are not filled in . I know you are there but where , its not the revnue board looking for an address.
Sound good to me,look forward to the progress in this section

saltRon

NrthFrk16 11-27-2001 11:03 PM

Ron-
He is a mythological flyfishing God!!


;) :D

saltRon 11-28-2001 01:15 AM

PNW . Salmon in the salt
 
Ryan ---- Will we call him " [Fly In The Sky]

With or without wings

saltron



topwater 11-30-2001 01:18 AM

ron, good idea. i fish for salmon offshore of neah bay, washington. the best thing about saltwater fishing for salmon is the variety of places to fish. i prefer going way offshore due to the sheer numbers of fish on and near the offshore banks, but i am interested in reading and hearing about the shore fishing and inside fisheries like clayquot sound, puget sound, sekiu... although i personally am not as interested in non-feeding estuary salmon.

hopefully the next salmon season shapes up to be as good (or at least close) to as good as this past season. nothing like an ocean salmon blitz (to steal an east coast striper term <G>) to get the blood pumping.

newsflash, this may seem nitpicky... but calling all saltwater salmon fishing "ocean" fishing is imo not quite accurate. i've fished for salmon in the strait and puget sound... and the ocean is a whole different world. don't take it too seriously though, because putting together good information on both the inshore and offshore salmon fisheries can only benefit those who want to partake in these fisheries, and the inshore fisheries are much more approachable for most fishermen, due to the calm water (most of the time <G>), shallower water, and the fact that boats aren't essential and if they are, small kicker boats will usually suffice, plus heavy sinking lines are not usually needed.

i also hope that most of the techniques discussed are on casting flies, and less on bucktailing. of course, there's a strong tradition of bucktailing in the northwest, but i'd like to think that a board and articles filled with information can help people have confidence in casting flies first. i have found that i have more confidence in casting flies to find fish than bucktailing to find fish... hell, i had some guys on my boat mooching for silvers on a real slow day and i wanted to uncork the flyrod just to see if there were fish around (and yes, once i thought about it i felt silly thinking about the 3 spinning herrings under the boat not being able to locate fish<G>).

on a side note, i was doing some family stuff that entailed a drive up whidbey island and we stopped at fort casey during the strong ebb current (running out of the sound). i stood on the bluff looking at that rip and it looked like picture perfect coho water. we walked down to the beach and talked to the bobber fishermen who were catching a few small silvers (biggest looked to be about 6 lbs... this was mid-oct.). does anyone flyfish this rip for silvers (shore or boat) and how do you do. just curious if the water types that kick serious ass at the entrance to the ocean are as productive inside puget sound, or if the coho somehow change in the water types they prefer as the get closer to their natal rivers?

chris

NrthFrk16 11-30-2001 01:52 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by topwater

on a side note, i was doing some family stuff that entailed a drive up whidbey island and we stopped at fort casey during the strong ebb current (running out of the sound). i stood on the bluff looking at that rip and it looked like picture perfect coho water. we walked down to the beach and talked to the bobber fishermen who were catching a few small silvers (biggest looked to be about 6 lbs... this was mid-oct.). does anyone flyfish this rip for silvers (shore or boat) and how do you do

;)

Chris-
I am one of those bobber fisherman and let me tell you that when the tide runs along Ft. Casey, the rips-which are within 10-150 ft of shore-just get stuffed with coho. They are well within casting distance and when the tide is screaming, I can not go a cast without catching a fish. Have not fished it with the fly but next year is the year. I am going to force myself to fish it with the fly and I seriously believe I wont have a problem, could also probally do really well on poppers. I cant wait!!! :)

Leland Miyawaki 11-30-2001 05:01 PM

Say guys,

I have fished Casey quite successfully with poppers and also down south beyond the ferry terminal along that long beach that's strewn with driftwood.

I have also fished my poppers for silvers, searuns and, occassionaly, blackmouth at Bush, Lincoln Park, the Narrows, Sekiu (with doublespey), Neah, Kopachuck, Joemma, Purdy, PNP and a bunch of other places that shall remain unnamed.

Maybe Brian will help me get my popper up on this site.

Leland.

sean 11-30-2001 05:11 PM

I can attest to the power of leland's popper and will be bringing it along with me for stripers with Juro in June. Will be interesting to see how it works out on the cape.

-sean

Leland Miyawaki 11-30-2001 05:28 PM

Sean

I thought I heard something about you moving back east. If you're still here (it sounds like it, or rather, looks like it), I'd like to give you a couple poppers to try on stripers.

Leland.

juro 11-30-2001 06:33 PM

Leland -

I was really amazed at the power of attraction your popper design has for coho salmon in the salt. Even as Brian was demonstrating it for us mid-day, sunshine, dead tide, coho would appear from nowhere and be silly with pursuit. Of course as soon as I broke out the video camera I jinxed it. I can only imagine what it was like the weekend you guys hit the straits.

I have no doubt that stripers would jump all over them when they are in a surface feeding mood. We'll catch it on video! :)

Quote:

Originally posted by Leland Miyawaki
Say guys,

I have fished Casey quite successfully with poppers and also down south beyond the ferry terminal along that long beach that's strewn with driftwood.

I have also fished my poppers for silvers, searuns and, occassionaly, blackmouth at Bush, Lincoln Park, the Narrows, Sekiu (with doublespey), Neah, Kopachuck, Joemma, Purdy, PNP and a bunch of other places that shall remain unnamed.

Maybe Brian will help me get my popper up on this site.

Leland.


sean 11-30-2001 06:34 PM

Yeah the fiancee wants to move back east and after looking at the options I convinced her the Boston area would be best. Of course the reason I chose Boston has nothing to do with the striper fishing;) .

I am still here though and am trying to get her to stay one last summer so I can say bye to the coho in a proper fashion.

Regardless I am going to go out in June to scout out places to live and take Juro up on his offer to show me the best of what the cape has to offer.

I am sure I will see you at Docs or one of the other beaches for the winter coho and would love to get some poppers from you to try out while I am there.

-sean

topwater 11-30-2001 06:39 PM

ryan,

when you were bobber fishing the rip, were you finding any decent sized silvers? like i mentioned, i was surprised with how small the silvers i saw being landed in mid-october, and was wondering if that was normal or just coincidence on the day i happened to be there.

maybe next october after i get the boat put away i'll run over there for a few days and see about catching a few more silvers, especially if there's legitamate shots at some fish over 8 lbs.

i can just picture how swinging a popper across those heavy currents would work.

it was also interesting to me when one of the guys cleaning the salmon showed me some tiny little sticklebacks the coho were eating (at least that's what i thought they were... because they definetely weren't herring or sand lances). gonna have to downsize my clousers from the long ones i usually fish at neah bay.

chris

juro 11-30-2001 07:26 PM

Chris -

I really hope I hook up with you next summer at Neah Bay. We used to stay at Big Salmon, is Al Seda still running it? Of course his daugthers were sure great to talk to. Something about a gal with hoochie earrings that could man the gaff as well as any man could on a Swiftshure halibut charter.

Anyway, we'd usually hit Greenbank, Duncan Rock, around Wadah if we weren't heading across. Eventually it we'd just head straight across to Swiftshure.

One day on the Bonilla/Tatoosh line the Canadian purse seiners were hard at it and there was a hard incoming tide running. We saw the birds going absolutely crazy about 100-300 yards west of the boundary so headed over to investigate. The seiner's "wall of death" had caused the salmon hordes riding the tide to back up like a downtown traffic jam and it was the biggest concentration of salmon I have ever seen and I am sure that I will ever see again. Just as we never seem to know what the back-ups caused by up ahead, the salmon didn't know either but were in a frenzy of feeding as bait also got pushed by the tide into this mass of emerald and silver bodies being held up by the carnage ahead. These concentrated salmon were boiling the water as they fed and the fishing was so intense we actually moved on to find more challenging water after several coho each, one weighing in the 16-17 # class. As we motored away, the thought of carnage that so many (dozens if not hundreds it seemed) purse seiners barricading the strait lingered in my mind. The irony of the salmon in a feeding frenzy as their brethren are meeting their end by the masses just ahead.

The might and magnitude of the ocean only makes me respect the coho more. The pacific northwest seas are truly amazing. The toughness of these salmon and steelhead as they venture fearlessly into the great blue beyond blows my mind.

NrthFrk16 11-30-2001 10:05 PM

Topwater-
Larger fish are caught by the bobber fisherman. The biggest I caught this past year was about 8#'s but freinds of mine hit fish to 12#'s.

I think the small showing of larger fish to the beach is not because of a lack of fish but because the smaller fish are so prolific and agressive. When the tide is swinging hard it is literally a fish a cast and during the peak swing you will have 2-3 coho chasing after your herring.

Once the tide dies the show, the fishing just dies. It is amazing!!!

Large kings and chums are incendental catches on the beach which can add to the fun and excitement. Here is a pic of a 20#+ king caught off Casey.

http://students.washington.edu/rpetz...ges/jerry2.jpg

Doublespey 11-30-2001 10:55 PM

Nice Pic, Sparky!! Now try to imagine that 'nook on your 7wt :D

Leland - we'll definitely have to get a pic of your popper up on the Archives. I'll grab my digital and shoot some pics, then you can get the text for tying and we'll be good to go.

Sounds like we have a lot of hard-core salmon anglers on the Forum - definitely the makings of a Clave next year at Neah or Seiku!! It would be fun to compare techniques.

Juro - so you're coming out next fall, eh??? :p

hasta,

DS


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