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Gillie 12-12-2004 01:08 PM

Red Fly
 
2 Attachment(s)
I have been working on a red fly for winter GL steelhead. I was inspired by Hunnicutts Blood on the Waters. I've done a few fish on this fly in slower winter holds. Tied a handful last night to stock the boxes for this winter.

Gillie 12-12-2004 01:17 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Trying for a better picture.

Charlie 12-12-2004 01:50 PM

Very nice Gillie,

Hows about listing the pattern? :D

Charlie

Gillie 12-12-2004 02:58 PM

Tail: Dyed red pheasant tippett
Butt: Med Gold Oval
Body: Firery Claret SLF
Underwing: Red Arctic Fox
Overwing: Rusty Brown Arctic Fox
1st Hackle: Red Schlappen
2nd Hackle: Claret Neck

I have been having good luck with this general pattern of Arctic fox under schlappen and a collar. I just vary color patterns.

speydoc 12-12-2004 05:50 PM

Gillie
Nice tie, I have also developed a fondness for artic fox as a wing on my smaller speys. I have palmered ringnecked pheasant rump or eared pheasant hackle over the front third in place of the schlappen - dyed mallard also looks good as a spey hackle.
speydoc

brooklynangler 12-12-2004 06:15 PM

hair=spey?
 
Is it actually possible to tie a "Spey" fly with hair?

Gillie 12-12-2004 07:06 PM

I've never really thought about whether it was a spey fly or simply a wet. In Sheweys book he does have some hairwing speys (albeit very few). I've always thought whether it was a spey or not was more determined by the hackling technique and hackle length. I was inspired for many of my flies by Marc Leblanc patterns which often use hairwings. I just know I like them.

Gillie

speydoc 12-12-2004 08:42 PM

Brooklynangler
Technicaly you are correct - a hair wing is not a true spey in the historic sense, however a lot of our modern "spey" flies are not true to the drab mallard roofed flies that originated on the Spey River +150 years ago. In the Pacific Northwest a modern spey fly is a fly essentialy with a long flowing hackle that moves in the current - these flies are in the process of evolution and I see no reason why we cannot incorporate a mobile material such as Artic Fox into the "melting pot"
speydoc

brooklynangler 12-12-2004 10:02 PM

Much agreed
 
Here-here on both counts. Very nice flies no matter.


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