Fly Fishing Forum - Reply to Topic
Warmwater flyfishing Bass, pike and even muskies in your backyard

Thread: Topwater Carpin' Reply to Thread
Title:
  
Message:
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Fly Fishing Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options
Rate Thread
If you like, you can add a score for this thread.

Topic Review (Newest First)
08-20-2002 12:54 PM
Mattb Adrian, one thing to consider is that maybe the 'circling' carp you're seeing would like to stop and eat, but they see you and decide they'll come back later.

In the pond I fish I've found that it's reasonably hard to spook the carp without lining them or hitting them with the fly, but it's painfully easy to put them off feeding(unless they're actively mudding, in which case it's like Quentin said- they're oblivious).

I would recommend having a look at the 'carp on the fly' book as well. It didn't have any groundbreaking information in it for me, but it had a couple of subtle things that it would've taken me a while to notice, and it had some good patterns.
08-20-2002 11:59 AM
Jdesjardins Q, yes the patern is for a cottonwood seed, although it could match a lot of different seeds
08-20-2002 11:31 AM
Quentin
Quote:
Originally posted by Dble Haul
CDC is short for cul de canard, which is literally French for duck's ass. In our tems, it refers to the feathers from that part of the duck's anatomy that are full of naturally water-resilient oils. These feathers are great for keeping dry flies afloat, and a little goes a long way.

Buyer beware...they can be expensive.
Thanks Mark. We've got loads of "nuisance" ducks around here that come right over to you when you try to fish (thanks to the "bread bag" brigade). Maybe I could pluck a few from a live one? That would help keep them away from me!

Q
08-20-2002 11:22 AM
Dble Haul CDC is short for cul de canard, which is literally French for duck's ass. In our tems, it refers to the feathers from that part of the duck's anatomy that are full of naturally water-resilient oils. These feathers are great for keeping dry flies afloat, and a little goes a long way.

Buyer beware...they can be expensive.
08-20-2002 11:10 AM
Quentin
Quote:
Originally posted by Adrian
Hey Q,

I went looking for my large friends lower down on the Housatonic this past week-end and they were still there. This time I actually spotted one feeding. Large puffs of mud off the edge of the weed bed - I knew what it was but thought the fish had already left. I made a cast to smallie out in the main current and a 20lb (min) made its leisurly departure from under my rod tip (son of a ......!)
That sounds familiar! Isn't it amazing that such a large fish can be so hard to see? (even when you *know* it's there!)

Just gotta keep trying 'til you find one that will cooperate!

John, I'm definitely going to get that book! Pardon my ignorance, but what's CDC? I presume this fly imitates a cottonwood seed?

Q
08-19-2002 09:39 AM
Adrian Hey Q,

I went looking for my large friends lower down on the Housatonic this past week-end and they were still there. This time I actually spotted one feeding. Large puffs of mud off the edge of the weed bed - I knew what it was but thought the fish had already left. I made a cast to smallie out in the main current and a 20lb (min) made its leisurly departure from under my rod tip (son of a ......!)

A bit later another large one came close enough to make eye contact but decided it wasn't hungry. The big fish are starting to show some occaisional interest in my flies - not follows as much as cursory glances.

These guys seem to fall into the circulating school pattern. They leisurly pass by up stream, then downstream about 15 minutes later. This is repeated, then, occaisionally, one will peel off to check out the edge of the weed beds.

They presumably get into a set feeding pattern at some point but I have not yet hit the time.

I was on the water Friday evening and the white fly hatch seems to be tapering off. Saturday I hit the water an hour before sunrise as the smallie action was non-stop - there were some very large fish about
08-18-2002 10:32 PM
Jdesjardins Q, in the book carp on the fly there is a seed pattern that is real simple: a tuft of CDC for the fluff, with a ball of thread for the seed.
08-18-2002 10:09 PM
pmflyfisher Q,

I guess they will take dry flys, on a local fishing show here in Chicago area last month they were catching carp on small caddis flies in one of our local rivers just before darkness. Saw it with my own eyes.
08-18-2002 03:58 PM
Quentin
Topwater Carpin'

Lips. Everywhere! I checked out a carp spot on the Housatonic section of the Housatonic River and found a bunch of little carp feeding on top. They were moving slowly along through the weeds and algae, occasionally poking just the top halves of their lips above the surface as they slurped up whatever they were eating. It reminded me of the old Pac-Man video game! There was a lot of duckweed floating among the weeds and it sort of looked like that's what they were after, so I tied on a small, bright green, foam bug with chartreuse rubber legs and I flipped it out near the weeds. I slowly dragged it into position just ahead of some "lips" and then let it float there for a moment. The lips moved away from the fly and then disappeared below the surface, but then another carp poked its lips up and ate the fly! It wasn't as though it got the fly while it was trying for something else, it was definitely after the fly! It stayed on the hook just long enough to spook the rest of the fish and then came unhooked. Although some of the carp did return and resume feeding, I never did get another one to hit the fly. Still, I consider it a minor victory to have actually hooked one on a floating fly since it adds another dimension to the game. I also tried a berry fly and a woolly bugger but had no success with them.

At another spot nearby, where the water is quite a bit deeper, there were dozens (maybe hundreds?) of BIG carp right on the surface. I watched them for a few moments and some of them did appear to be eating, although most of them just seemed to be sunning themselves. Unfortunately, the steep bank, excessive brush and poison ivy prevented me from trying for them. I need to find a place to launch my boat in that stretch of the river!

Q

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:46 PM.



Copyright Flyfishingforum.com (All Rights Reserved)