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Classic Atlantic Salmon No pursuit rivals salmon rivers, flies & legacy

Thread: Single-handed rod Vs. Double-handed rod for Salmon Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-17-2006 06:56 PM
Muckle Salmon
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willie Gunn
Troot= Brown trout we fish for trout with single handed rods
Mind you, for a great muckle troot (steelhead) a two hander does come in handy

Ramsay
01-15-2006 04:38 PM
Willie Gunn
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muckle Salmon
Willie: A question for my bretheren> "Fit's a troot?"
Troot= Brown trout we fish for trout with single handed rods
01-15-2006 03:47 PM
flytyer Anne,

I heard exactly those same things (in fact, I still hear them at times) here in the PNW on steelhead rivers back in the early 90's. I have a very good friend who is now in his middle 60's that won't even pick up one of my 2-handers to see if he would like it because in his words, "those things are so big and heavy, it has to be like casing a telephone pole all day long. Besides, those long monster rods would wear a normal person out in less than an hour." This from a guy who uses a 10' 10 wt in winter; but I suppose since he has been flyfishing for steelhead since his teens, it is very difficult for him to see how using 2 hands on a longer rod is actually easier on the body than the 10' rods he uses.

Malcolm,

I remember very well reading Lee Wulff and Col. Bates writing about how much more pleasurable using the shorter 9' rods were for salmon. I also remember reading their words about how uneccessary it is to use such "old fashioned" equipment as the overly long and heavy 2-handers still in use in Europe for salmon. I seem to recall that they also said something about the lighter 9' single handers eventually taking over from the big, heavy 2-handers as fishers folks in Europe learned the joys of fishing with lighter and more enjoyable to casts 9' rods.

I suppose they would be turning over in their graves today since 2-handers have regained a following.
01-14-2006 11:30 PM
QuebecSporting
Grosse perche!!

I still remember when the Americans came to Scotland before they had invented Speycasting. They would produce these silly little 9ft rods, and the old gillies would look at them and say "Oh you just here for the troot." Then after great explanations about how quickly you could land fish with a short rod off they would march. They spent the rest of the week climbing trees rescuing flies .........great fun.
__________________
WG......LOL!!

Hmmm?? Funny you mention this.......... here in town, I remember ( while workimg at the zec office a few years ago!!
anglers would coming in for an afternoon chat and mention......
Man !! There is a guy in Zone 9,,,,,,, fishing with a telephone pole!!!!!!!
He'll never catch fish....
Who are these weirdo's with the big rods... holdimg them with 2 hands!! Man they must be heavy things!!

But, then it all changed a few years ago!
...
We all sat and watched!!!!

Or , like me, some were up in a trees trying to save a Magog Smelt or Picasse and these weirdos were still on shore and casting further and further !!!

The challenge is about how we catch the fish and not the size!!!
Isn't that why we are all still fishing???

Ann
01-14-2006 06:50 PM
Muckle Salmon Willie: A question for my bretheren> "Fit's a troot?"
01-14-2006 03:06 PM
fredaevans
Quote:
Originally Posted by juro
Interesting poll results...

I would wager that the two-hand N.A. are mostly steelheaders, and the singles mostly atlantics due to the effectiveness of bombers etc.
Juro, I wouldn't bet against you on that observation.
Fred
01-14-2006 03:04 PM
juro Interesting poll results...

I would wager that the two-hand N.A. are mostly steelheaders, and the singles mostly atlantics due to the effectiveness of bombers etc.
01-14-2006 03:02 PM
fredaevans Willie, you've just landed on my MAJOR "what?, and why not???" I've never understood why folks taking/getting single hander lessons aren't taught some of the basic spey casts.

The rod niether knows, nor cares, what kind of cast it's being asked to execute. Other than 'skill level' I can't think of a single "spey cast" that can't be done with a single hander.
Fred

Willie, a slight correction if I may. It was 'us' Canadian's that invented spey casting; we taught it to the Ammi's. The rest about them going to Scotland is probably correct. As a group, we're far too modest.
:>)
01-13-2006 01:54 PM
Willie Gunn I still remember when the Americans came to Scotland before they had invented Speycasting. They would produce these silly little 9ft rods, and the old gillies would look at them and say "Oh you just here for the troot." Then after great explanations about how quickly you could land fish with a short rod off they would march. They spent the rest of the week climbing trees rescuing flies .........great fun.
01-13-2006 12:05 PM
Bugman Like Bill, there are 'horses for courses' for me when it comes to rod choice.

On open pools on small- to moderate-sized rivers, I prefer a single-handed rod. I like the feel of casting with a nice 8-weight outfit and I MUCH prefer to play fish on the single-hander.

Big water, or places where backcasts are not possible (e.g. gorge pools) prompt me to use the two-hander. These days, I do my (poor) version of spey casting any time I'm using big rods and rarely throw them overhand - I need all of the practice that I can get!

If I'm very tired or injured, I'm inclined to use the two hander. If I'm sick or hung over, I need the comfort of the single on those 'delicate' mornings.

Sink tips (which I RARELY use on salmon rivers) = two hander.

After weeks of tossing my four weight on the trout stream, a single-handed salmon rod feels like a telephone pole on the first day. I'll often start a multi-day trip with the big rod. After a day on this weapon, my 8 weight feels nice and light.

There are different 'customs' on different rivers, and I usually try to go with the local 'style' of fishing. For example, you are likely to get some looks (at the least) when you whip out your big rod on many places on the Main SW Miramichi. This river has many large pools that would appear to be suitable for the big rods. However, most local Main SW Miramichi anglers have no problem covering the largish pools with a single hander. They are inclined to think (or say) that you are using inappropriate gear. In particular, my guide does not like all of the ripping of water that takes place when spey-casting a quiet pool. He thinks that it disturbs the salmon - in a bad way.

On the other hand, a very good guide on the Margaree practically insisted that I use my two-hander to cover this moderate-sized river. Once I was guideless, I returned to using my single hander, and had no real problem covering the pools above the Forks. At/below the Forks, a big rod is the ideal weapon!

Hell, most of us are gear freaks anyway. Bring a pile of rods on your trip. This also can save you if you have a multi-rod smash day. I did in TWO rods in a single morning on the Dartmouth last summer, and was mighty happy that I'd packed a pile of gear!

My $0.02

Jim Corrigan
01-13-2006 11:48 AM
Gary W I agree with wrke. If I am fishing medium to big rivers I will usually fish double handed rods from 13' to 16'. However on smaller rivers or where a lot of hand lining is required I prefer to use a single handed rod. However, I usually up my line rating on the single handers to allow easy roll and spey casting in tight spots.
01-13-2006 10:46 AM
wrke Charlie
There's no way for me to respond. I use both. There are times when a double-hander is like fishing a spring creek with a tarpon rod, and other times when a double-hander is clearly the only choice. I use (and love) both, depending on the situation.
Bill
01-13-2006 10:45 AM
juro BTW - to vote you must sign in.
01-13-2006 09:59 AM
Charlie
Single-handed rod Vs. Double-handed rod for Salmon

I'm interested in what percentage of you fish for Atlantic salmon with a single-handed rod verses a double-handed rod and weather you are from North America or the European theater. I would be willing to bet that our good friends on the eastern side of the big pond use double-handed rods for Atlantics more than us westerners do. As Willie Gunn said in another post “Salmon= Spey”. But there is only one sure way to find out.

Charlie

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