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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-27-2005 03:30 AM
Jackjumperfish hey everyone. Hope I'm not butting in. I know the original post wasn't mine but I just want to say you have all helped me enormously with my own questions. I am brand spanking new to fly fishing and now hopefully I won't sound like such a greenhorn when I walk into a fly shop for the first time. Thanks.
01-12-2005 12:42 PM
teflon_jones For what you've described, an 8 ft 5 wt rod is the best compromise of casting distance and ease of use in tight streams. Ideally, a 7-7.5 ft 4 wt would be ideal for a small, tight stream. And an 8.5-9 ft 6 wt would be perfect for pond and lake fishing. So split the difference, and you get an 8 ft 5 wt.

Only you can decide whether to get a 2, 3, or 4 piece rod. Are you honestly going to backpack long distances with it? I regularly hike several miles with my 7.5 ft 4 wt put together and rigged up already, including with the line though the guides and a fly on. I occassionally will pull it apart and carry it, but most of the time, I just leave it together. Unless you're planning on going on long hikes to get to your fishing holes, or frequently backpack with fishing gear, get a 2 piece. The St Croix Premier would be my choice. The P805.2 is the 2 piece model ($80 list, but can be had for $50-60 on eBay), and the P805.4 is the 4 piece model ($100 list, and harder to find a deal on).

As for casting differences with more pieces, in a good quality rod like a St Croix, and with your limited experience, you're hardly going to feel any difference at all.
01-10-2005 10:49 PM
bluegillbob The only problem I have with flyshops...I live in Eastern NC...and there are none! The nearest flyshop is a 5 hr drive! Besides, the flyshops specialize in trout, not the LM bass and crappies I flyfish for!
12-25-2004 06:39 PM
fishingbum oh yeah, first rig...

i was looking for a beginner setup myself earlier this year and spent a tad bit more to go with a Scott V2 6#/9'/4x with Cortland reel and SA Headstart line. it's a been a very decent setup for me and it's seen action on all sorts of large rivers and small creeks in Colorado. i walked into a shop in Austin and the dude knew exactly what i should get as a beginner. even now, as my casting has improved times over, the rod feels good. i'm starting into stiffer actions now, but for backpacking and riding into spots, i'll have a good rig to go to. the four-piece packs perfectly in a CamelBak and on my larger backpack so getting around with it is not an issue.

for your future -- this is based on me so take it loosely i suppose -- you'll likely improve your casting dramatically, want to fish for specific species, learn to use streamers, learn to nymph with an indicator, etc., so you'll want a more specialized rod so i wouldn't look at this rod being your last. just another tool to use when you need it. i only started fly fishing this year and already i have a second rod for coastal species, plus i'm looking to get a short, light, portable spring creek rig for my return to the mountains. it never ends muwahaha...
12-25-2004 06:26 PM
fishingbum
Quote:
Originally Posted by juro
Good advice for a budget outfit but the problem I have with big mail order / mega sport shop is that they are putting the neighborhood flyshops in a bind. The local fly shop puts a knowledgeable pro into the shop to take care of you, often willing to go the extra mile... but the megashop/mail businesses undercuts the prices by purchasing inventory en masse with a clerk that barely knows how to spell "flyfishing".

When I think back about where my knowledge and flyfishing passion came from, I think about the crusty old guy who somehow managed to make a living at the flyshop in town. I think back about a secret spot he shared with me, or a line recipe, fly pattern, etc. I've even had flyshop pros take me to a spot in person.

Some are certified instructors, and while out trying a rod in the parking lot you might end up getting a tailing loop cleaned up.

I just can't seem to get myself to undermine that important relationship with the flyshops I visit. Just something to think about.
yep. no mailorder shop 1500 miles away is going to tell you what hatches on your river at what time of year and what time of day let alone what fly to use to fish that river. you can't take a mailorder rod out to the parking lot to feel how it loads. you can't ask the salesperson on the phone how to get to the 'money' spot along the flats on the local coast. and i sure as heck wouldn't trust the backing to line knot i rigged on my reel for the first time ever when i can have it done by someone who's done it hundreds of times before.

i've browsed mailorder places before and probably will buy mailorder stuff in the future if the local shop doesn't carry it. but rarely. the local guys are the same price as most places, plus they can hand it to me the same day, plus advice is usually free, plus they can rig it better than me.

what was the subject again?

12-25-2004 01:28 AM
juro Good advice for a budget outfit but the problem I have with big mail order / mega sport shop is that they are putting the neighborhood flyshops in a bind. The local fly shop puts a knowledgeable pro into the shop to take care of you, often willing to go the extra mile... but the megashop/mail businesses undercuts the prices by purchasing inventory en masse with a clerk that barely knows how to spell "flyfishing".

When I think back about where my knowledge and flyfishing passion came from, I think about the crusty old guy who somehow managed to make a living at the flyshop in town. I think back about a secret spot he shared with me, or a line recipe, fly pattern, etc. I've even had flyshop pros take me to a spot in person.

Some are certified instructors, and while out trying a rod in the parking lot you might end up getting a tailing loop cleaned up.

I just can't seem to get myself to undermine that important relationship with the flyshops I visit. Just something to think about.
12-23-2004 09:29 PM
bluegillbob Hi!

The best advice I could give would be to visit the places that sell flyrods. Cast different flyrods to see what you are comfortable with.

"All around outfit?" You can't go wrong with a 6wt. I've caught LM bass that went 20" on a 6wt...a 6wt has more power than you believe.

I prefer 3pc and 4pc rods. Modern day flyrods are more sensitive than the old fiberglass ones. Besides, 3 & 4pc rods are compact and store nicely.

Beginner outfit? You can't go wrong with Bass Pro Shop's combo the "Hobbs Creek Combo." I have the 4wt. My 4wt casts nice, is light, and at 7' 6", has plenty of reach! You can purchase the Hobbs Creek from 4wt to 8wt. A 5wt or 6wt would be a fine "all purpose outfit." You get the rod, reel, backing, line, and leader for $100-$110).

My little 4wt has caught bluegills, crappies, and plenty of 12" LM bass.

Stay away from the expensive outfits for now. After you develop your flyfishing skills, then move up to better rods.

I've been flyrodding for 4 yrs, and I love my little Hobbs Creek 4wt! Fun little outfit!
12-17-2004 02:17 PM
salt dog
Boundary water

If you'll be hiking or going regularly to the Boundary water and portaging canoe etc., you will definitely want to have at least a 3-piece rod for ease of carrying and storage while hiking with back pack, canoe overhead, and paddles, etc.(I've been there!). Rods are engineered so much better today than a decade ago regarding ferules (connectors between rod sections) and the rod transition through ferules in no longer much of any issue, especially on a shorter rod.

Purchase a rod/reel combo that will take care of the fishing you will most likely do on a regular basis while going up the learning curve. Redington or St Croix will put you were you need to be, no problem. It may be years before you can even discern the differences between the upper end rods and the combo's. Eight ft. 5 weight sounds about right for trout, medium bass, and all pan fish, but don't be disappointed if you have trouble landing a 42" northern pike on a 5wgt. rod, but they will be lots of fun while they scream out line half way across the lake before they chew through your tippet. Expect that if you pursue fly fishing with a passion you will gradually build up a collection of rods and reels to suit your needs as you understand what length and weight translate into in terms of casting and fishing. You live in great fishing country, and I envy you your experiences to come in the Boundary water with a fly rod.
09-28-2004 10:32 PM
DEERHAAWK
Rods, to start

Good evening,
Big E 77, Is there a Fly shop in your area that you can visit? If there is, I would suggest going there and trying every rod that the owner will let you try! Low ball, top-o-the line, what ever you can get your hands on.
See how the rods feel in your hand, test cast it, check the action, balance. Most shops will be glad to let you do this, for free! Let the sales person explain action, types and weights of line, reels etc.
1 hour or more in a shop can give a novice a wealth of information that will help you in chosing the right set-up, whatever the price! Even if you have to drive a stretch to get to a shop, go! Make a day of it, take the wife along, heck, she might see that big grin on your face and let you spring for a little more$

There is alot of inexpensive, quality equipment out there, and IMHO you should go with a 9' 5wt. 2 piece and adapt your style to smaller situations! I do, and it's easy, trust me. Then your covered for whatever you encounter, from Sun Fish to Steelhead.
Glad to have you aboard!

Deerhawk
09-28-2004 02:53 PM
flytyer For what you are looking at using the rod for, it is a very good value and you wouldn't go wrong with it. You can use the shorter rod for torut out west and for smallmouth; just keep in mind that it requires more work to cast a short rod over 45'-50' and that it takes more work with the lighter line 4 wt to cast flies larger than #12 than with a 5 or 6 wt. I'd be inclined to get a 7'6" (possibly 8') 5 wt instead of the 4 wt because it will handle the bigger flies used for smallmout and handle wind on the large western rivers better than the 4 wt. A 4-piece 7'6" or 8' pack rod is not necessary unless you are going to be using the rod a lot on backpacking trips. Therefore, I'd get the 2-piece like you dad recommended.

Welcome to the word of fly fishing!
09-28-2004 02:06 PM
Big E '77 Thanks for the replies guys! I guess the streams around here are more brushy and narrow... thus my father's logic that a long rod wouldn't do. So the majority of the fish will be trout, I believe. My dad said small mouth is supposedly pretty fun to fish for, and there are alot of them up in the Boundary Waters.

So, if I got a shorter rod for the creeks and streams around here, would I be losing a lot if I were to do some fishing out west or on lakes in the Boundary Waters?

As for price range, well my wife is a little hesitant to see me drop too much money. I suppose our basement full of all my attempted new hobbies is good evidence for her case. I like what I've heard/read about the Crosswater, and as a full combo it runs $100-130. I probably wouldn't be too interested in spending much more than that at this point, unless someone can make a very good case for it. I was just curious as to if there was anything else in that price range, or less that would be a good recommendation for a beginning set-up.
09-28-2004 01:44 PM
flytyer We need some important information before anyone can offer good advice to you on your question.

First, what type of fish are you going to be fishing for. This is needed because there is a huge difference in what is needed to fish for trout in small to mid sized streams; that needed for large or small mouth bass; that used for pike; etc. This is because the size of the fly being cast has a large bearing on the rod you should use.

Second, how much do you want to spend on a rod? or is it rod, reel, line combo (complete outfit) you are needing to be under a specific dollar amount?

Third, how brushy or overgrown are the places you are going to fish? This is needed to properly recommend a rod length. A small brushy creek with branches overhead is going to need a much shorter rod than a lake or larger river.

There are quite a few rods that are great values for those starting out, the Redington Breakwater is one. There are also rods by TFO, St. Croix, and Loomis which are excellent value, lower priced rods. Loomis even offers 4 different rod, reel, line combos with line for around $175.00 for the complete combo, and they are a great value.
09-28-2004 01:37 PM
Dble Haul I can't speak to the effectiveness of the Redington rod, but I will say that the length of the rod you purchase will depend on what type and what size of water you'll be fishing. If it's spring creeks or canopied streams, then the shorter rod would be preferable. But if you'll be fishing big (read wide) rivers, then there is really nothing wrong with a 9' rod. It will help with mending line over the currents, and can be particularly useful highsticking nymphs.

Hopefully someone else will chime in with a review of the rod you've asked about here. But in the meantime, think about how what type of water you'll be fishing will determine what rod length is best for you.
09-28-2004 12:51 PM
Big E '77
Need a good beginner's setup... any advice?

Hello! Recently I spent two weeks out in Washington state, and my brother in-law taught me how to fly fish. I know it sounds cheesy, but it was a dream come true! I have been wanting to give it a try for years, and I was finally able to!

Anyway, now that I am hooked I want to get my own setup. My brother in-law recommends the Redington Crosswater 9' 5/6, and since he is an avid backpacker strongly suggests the 4 piece. I have read a couple reviews online, and this seems to get good write-ups.

I live in Minnesota, and was talking with my father (who used to fly fish years ago), and he said a 9' would be too long for the midwest (he said because of the brush I should consider 7'6"-8'), and discouraged the 4 piece because because the action wouldn't be as smooth.

So, my question is two-fold, I guess. First, is the Crosswater the combo to go with, or is there something else that is a good beginner's set-up that may run comparable or even a little less $$ (but not a Wal-Mart get-up!), withou being something that I will outgrow right away? And second, as for size, will I be okay using a 9' in the Midwest, or would it be worth going shorter to begin with, and then upgrading to a longer rod down the road?

Thanks for any help you may be able to offer!

Erik Lundeen
eriklundeen@comcast.net

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