online casting instructions? [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: online casting instructions?


newbiefish
03-24-2002, 01:23 AM
Hi,

Are there any websites that have diagrams and discussion of casting technique for a beginner?

Roop
03-24-2002, 06:41 AM
None that I've found.

Try to find some of the Mel Kreiger intro to fly fishing videos or books:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-form/104-6296854-9533558

as well as Joan Wulff's casting instruction books:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-form/104-6296854-9533558

Good luck,

Roop

JimW
03-24-2002, 07:32 AM
Here's something to check out
http://www.sexyloops.co.uk/flycasting/index.shtml
Go to the bottom of the page and click on
On to the first tip

FlyMan
03-25-2002, 07:27 AM
Also try Orvis at:

http://www.mysportsguru.com/CDA/orvis/roll_cast.html

fredaevans
03-25-2002, 05:23 PM
http://www.sexyloops.co.uk/cgi-bin/fluffy/fluffysearch.pl?words=spey+fishing

newbiefish
03-26-2002, 04:01 AM
Hi,

Thanks for the links.

I was reading something about casting that confused me. It said the line travels in a different plane on the back cast than on the front cast. How is that done? I asssumed you brought your arm straight back on the back cast and then snapped straight forward on the forward cast. Are you supposed to loop your arm somehow at the end of the back cast and the start of the forward cast?

Quentin
03-26-2002, 07:14 AM
Originally posted by newbiefish
I was reading something about casting that confused me. It said the line travels in a different plane on the back cast than on the front cast. How is that done? I asssumed you brought your arm straight back on the back cast and then snapped straight forward on the forward cast. Are you supposed to loop your arm somehow at the end of the back cast and the start of the forward cast?

Maybe they mean a different horizontal plane, not the plane through which your arm travels. That is, the back cast is angled upwards, but the forward cast goes straight out. I'm a newbie too, so perhaps someone else can elaborate on this.

Q

Great links too, by the way. The one with the animations is really cool.

Roop
03-26-2002, 07:26 AM
You're going to get a million different answers.

Go to a local shop & see if they have an intro class, buy one of the books on the subject, go out with a fly fishing friend, pick up a rod & just experiment.

Good luck

newbiefish
03-26-2002, 10:04 AM
Hi,

I am signed up to take a flyfishing class, but I was doing some reading on my own before it starts. The diagram I saw was from above the caster looking down at the top of their head:


forward...^ ......|
cast........ | .......|
...............|.........|
...............|.........|
...............|.........|
...............|.........|
...............|.........V back cast

X (caster)

I also remember something about the fly catching on the line if you don't have the back cast and forward cast in different vertical planes. How do you achieve that? Do you hold your arm out away from your body on the back cast, then bring it in close before you start the forward cast, or does it just involve starting the back cast with the line laying on the water out to the caster's right.

Broadbill
03-26-2002, 10:34 AM
Newbie -

I wouldn't worry too much about "vertical plane" issues at this stage of your learning curve--a little like worrying about what color the shutters are before you've poured the foundation. Any wind and modest variation in your arm position on the backcast are likely to elimate the chance of snagging the line with the hook.

You've gotten good advice here, and your inclination to take a course is the right one. No substitute for hands-on experience under the eye of a good teacher. To the earlier Kreh and Wulff resources, I'd add George Roberts' video and booklet. His no-nonsense instruction is geared to getting distance in the salt. His website is:
http://www.whitemouseflyfishing.com/

old man
03-26-2002, 10:52 AM
Practice,practice,practice. Go to the Library abd see what they have. Went there just to go look and ended up getting a card and checking out a few books and video's on fly fishing. You can't go wrong and it's all free. Jim S.:D

Smcdermott
03-26-2002, 04:23 PM
Newbiefish,

I am also brand new to flyfishing and have been doing a lot of research on this subject. From your diagram it appears that you may be referring to a style of casting that Lefty Kreh teaches in which he suggests that for longer casts you should take the rod back to the side on the back cast to allow the rod to travel further back and provide maximum load. (Read Lefty Kreh's Modern Fly Casting Method). If you have the opportunity in your area I would highly recommend going to a fly fishing show and spending some time watching as many casting demonstrations as possible. I had the opportunity to work with Lefty for a few minutes on two occasions, which was invaluable. Good luck with your progress and please let me know if you come across any more good information.

Sean

newbiefish
03-27-2002, 05:43 AM
Hi Smcdermott,

Do you have any advice on fly rods? I have been reading good things about Temple Forks rods(9' 6# 4pc $139) being a great "value", but I went to the fly shop today to check out other alternatives, and of course they want to sell me a Sage DS2 9' 6# 4pc for $275. The guy said it was an entry level rod as does Sage's website. Seems puuuurty expensive (Any noticeable difference for a beginner?). I have also been looking at the Okuma Sierra reel($35, line + backing is extra) or the Okuma Integrity large arbor reel($96 w/ line and backing). Any info you found out would be appreciated.

DFix
03-27-2002, 09:39 AM
Newbie and SmcD-

Much like the other thread on value/price point/personal opinions - if this guy wants to sell you a Sage, decide if you want to buy a Sage. Sounds like I'm trying to stir the pot, but not. The TFO mid-flex graphite (medium-fast, mid-fast, more progressive loading, slower, whatever)probably suits a beginner better than a tip or fast flex blank. So far, without looking at a Sage website, I don't know what they advertise the blank to do; it might be the same speed blank. Thirty bucks isn't much difference - what does thirty bucks difference feel like to your cast?

You owe it to yourself to cast them, feel the actions with lines one size lower and higher than the blank recommends, etc., just like you are looking at the reels for best quality and value.

Test, test, test. Borrow, beg, do whatever is necessary to educate yourself, but be comfortable with the tool in your hand and how it accomodates your mechanics - suit yourself; because every carpenter uses a hammer doesn't mean every carpenter likes the same hammer. The cautionary statement in all this is: 'Don't blame the tool, blame the operator', 'Buyer beware', all that - just educate yourself as best you can.

newbiefish
03-27-2002, 12:58 PM
"Thirty bucks isn't much difference - what does thirty bucks difference feel like to your cast?"

$139(TFO) - $275(Sage) = $136

The Sage is almost twice as expensive as the Temple Forks rod.

DFix
03-27-2002, 01:36 PM
(Oops - must've been thinking I paid attention - don't know where I got 'thirty bucks' difference)

sean
03-27-2002, 01:42 PM
I have casted both the rods you mention and there is not realy a huge difference. If I were you I would go for the okuma and temple fork as a small investment to start. Down the road if you get into it you will probably get a nicer rod but I do not reccomend dropping a ton of cash just starting out.

Templefork does have a IM6 rod which I think you are looking at but they also have the IM8 which is closer in cost to the sage DS2. The IM6 is a great rod to start with and you may want to look at some redingtons and st. croixs as well.

You can also find good deals online once you have gone out and casted the rods you are interested in. I buy all my rods online as I can usaully find them at least 20% off and not have to pay tax.

The okumas are a very good reel for the price. I have 6 of them and use them as backups nowadays. However I have caught salmon up to 20 pounds on them and have never had one break. For a trout reel they cannot be beat.

-sean

old man
03-27-2002, 04:02 PM
When ever I go out and but something new for fly fishing. I usually buy what I can afford not what some one wants to sell me.
If you are just starting out get what you can afford and if you enjoy it you can always up grade.
I started out with a el-cheep-o rod and reel and after I found out that I like this type of fishing I went out and got something better.
I now have 4 rods and reels but whos to know that I won't buy any more. If I do I hope that my wife doesn't divorce me.
Just my .02. Jim S.:D :D

Hawkeye
03-27-2002, 08:48 PM
I fished for many years with a 6/7 berkely fiberglass rod (about 25 bucks then ... now?) and a single action martin reel (about 10 bucks ... now?). That equipment served me well and indeed is still around and quite usable.

seamoose
03-28-2002, 05:56 PM
In reply to Nebyfisherman angle of plane
Have to put my 2cents worth in ! Do what you can afford !!!.Remember fish were caught long before
geometry and graphite .. watch videos when the weather sucks !watch other fly casters before you cast . Read when you can't fish and have nothing to do. Then go out catch your ear ,your waders or your boat , Hang em in the trees if on a stream !and laugh when you do . One day it comes and you by some grace of the gods you catch a fish ~!!
And it feels great!!! The fish don't care about the plane or the area under a curve. Or how much you spend.All human wisdom (including Fishermen)
is summed up in three words Wait and Hope!!
Good Luck

FlyFishAR
03-31-2002, 11:34 AM
One of the best casting websites I have found is Paul Ardens. http://www.sexyloops.co.uk/index.shtml

He does a good job of explaining the basic cast. He also has a considerable amount of information that is useful to the advanced fly caster.

Some others that are of interest are:
Lefty Kreh's site http://www.allflyfishing.com/
Federation of Fly Fishers http://www.fedflyfishers.org/

If you have some specific questions regarding casting I can respond via e-mail

John W. Wilson
US Fly Fishing Team

juro
03-31-2002, 11:53 AM
Newbie -

If I understand the pic and words correctly, this is true and something I incorporate in my basic fly casting course. If we are talking about the same principle (I'd be interested to read the reference you made) this is a fact that becomes emphasized while learning Spey casting. The point is that the two halves of the fly line in any given loop must be in parallel planes with the energized loop on the inside plane and the other half coming along for the ride on the outside (parallel) plane.

To demonstrate this, I do the following:

a) Lay the line for a roll cast, and execute a roll cast to the inside of the line laying on the water. Observe the results.

b) Now try it again with the line directly on top of the laying line. Observe the results.

c) Now try it again to the outside of the laying line. Observe the results.

will talk later, guests arriving for Easter...

Originally posted by newbiefish
Hi,

I am signed up to take a flyfishing class, but I was doing some reading on my own before it starts. The diagram I saw was from above the caster looking down at the top of their head:


forward...^ ......|
cast........ | .......|
...............|.........|
...............|.........|
...............|.........|
...............|.........|
...............|.........V back cast

X (caster)

I also remember something about the fly catching on the line if you don't have the back cast and forward cast in different vertical planes. How do you achieve that? Do you hold your arm out away from your body on the back cast, then bring it in close before you start the forward cast, or does it just involve starting the back cast with the line laying on the water out to the caster's right.