Tube Flies on the Gaspe? [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: Tube Flies on the Gaspe?


Venture
02-12-2013, 04:48 PM
Went to a salmon forum last week on Long Island where the lecturer spent a lot of time talking about tube flies. In all my years on the Gaspe I never encountered anyone who fished them, although when I was in Russia they were extremely popular.

So what is the story with tubes on the Gaspe. Although weighted flies are illegal on most if not all rivers, how about plastic tube flies or micro tubes? Anyone have any experience with them in Canada?

petevicar
02-13-2013, 05:55 AM
Hi Howie
I have fished hitched tubes on the Grand with some success. My guide was astonished.

wrke
02-13-2013, 07:44 AM
Howie,

I fish them all the time. Waked flies and wets. Everything between small waked flies on micro tubes, and larger plastic, aluminum and copper tubes. And yes, copper and aluminum tubes are legal in Quebec . . . but not in New Brunswick. I carry a letter with me from the head of fish and game (I can't remember the name of the agency) that affirms they are legal. You may NOT ADD weight to any flies in Quebec, but metal tubes are legal. I only use simple cylindrical metal tubes, not the heavily shaped ones.

I'm not sure if the heavily shaped metal tubes are legal (you know, the ones that look like they have a cone in the front), but I would never use them. I would they should be outlawed.

I rarely use copper tubes . . . I don't like the sporting characteristics, but I do use aluminum tubes. They ride just barely below the surface.

Tubes are terrific as you can use small hooks on any size fly, include large flies. Small hooks have greater holding ability . . . especially compared to a large hook as it eliminates a lot of leverage from pulling at different angle when playing the fish. Large hooks can do more damage to the fish. There's also less damage to the flies . . . only the hook is in their mouth. Most of the time when you land your fish, the fly will actually be up the leader.

Tubes have been a standard for me on the Gaspé for many years. I probably use them nearly half the time.

Bill

JR SPEY
02-13-2013, 10:08 AM
I've also used tubes in that area since about 2001. I fished the Restigouche the most and the issue there is that one bank is Quebec and the other is NB. I finally determining that I could fish the area with either provincial license (which took a great deal of legwork as Red Pine Mountain Lodge at the time required a NB license.) Once I received written information from both provinces that either license was OK I then established that having the Quebec license would be best if I were going to fish aluminum tubes. When I fished plastic tubes, especially in NB I'd use an intermediate polyleader and/or Scandi head to help get it down a bit. I liked the fact that I could retire my 2/0 and 3/0 doubles for the late May/early June timeframe. I also used tubes quite a bit on the Petite and York.

Bill, are you referring to what many of us call bottle tubes? I'm not sure what the objection would be to those, but from your description I'm guessing you're actually referring to something newer than that. I haven't salmon fished for about four years now, so there must be a ton of new stuff trying to take advantage of the tube fly popularity.

wrke
02-13-2013, 11:29 AM
JR
I guess they might be newer, but mainly I don't like them as they're REALLY heavy.

juro
02-14-2013, 10:43 AM
Bill -

I agree with the heavy tube assessment, especially when casting anything other than a Skagit setup it gives "anchor" new meaning.

What are the bonefish plans this year?

reely
02-14-2013, 09:05 PM
They work in fast water and I have used them on the York and Dartmouth with success.

Venture
02-16-2013, 05:54 PM
I purhased some soft plastic tubing from Canadian Tube Flies, and Mad River along with some coils of micro tubing and I am ready to ty some up but I do have some questions, as I have no experience tying tubes.

1 - Do I need cone heads or can I just melt the ends of the plastic tubes?

2 - With hybrid soft plastic tubes, do I just ty on one straight section if the hook fits snuggley into the rear?

3 - What patterns and sizes are the best for the Gaspe Rivers or do you just duplicate conventional patterns on the tube?

4 - Very interested in learning more about tying Micro Tubes and hitched Micro Tube patterns and learning some techniques and favorite tricks? Any advice or website recommendations are appreciated.

5 - Also saw some article about tying bombers on tubes. Looks like there should be benifits there as well.

Very thirsty for any information.....

Howie

JR SPEY
02-17-2013, 09:29 AM
I purhased some soft plastic tubing from Canadian Tube Flies, and Mad River along with some coils of micro tubing and I am ready to ty some up but I do have some questions, as I have no experience tying tubes.

1 - Do I need cone heads or can I just melt the ends of the plastic tubes?

2 - With hybrid soft plastic tubes, do I just ty on one straight section if the hook fits snuggley into the rear?

3 - What patterns and sizes are the best for the Gaspe Rivers or do you just duplicate conventional patterns on the tube?

4 - Very interested in learning more about tying Micro Tubes and hitched Micro Tube patterns and learning some techniques and favorite tricks? Any advice or website recommendations are appreciated.

5 - Also saw some article about tying bombers on tubes. Looks like there should be benifits there as well.

Very thirsty for any information.....

Howie

Howie,

1. I think that would make your flies illegal in all scheduled Atlantic Salmon rivers. I'm willing to be corrected on that, but it's adding weight to the hook.

2. That's what I do. There are other ways to go about it, however.

3. Pretty much match the size of the flies I'd use if using normal hooks. Sometimes I go a bit longer. The largest tube hook I use is the Loop Tube double #2.

4. I bought a number of them when fishing in Iceland, but I've only tied a few. I like turning micro tubes into riffle tubes when I tie them. I've only used those in Iceland and on a few Miramichi tribs in the fall.

5. I've seen the same information, but haven't yet tried any as I have dozens and dozens of bombers tied on standard hooks. They should work fine, however.

Venture
02-18-2013, 01:55 PM
Great information Jr Spey! Thanks for the time. I'm going to give them a try. I know many places where a hitched micro tubes like the big lie in Lebreaux. Also want to show the fish a bigger tubes in some of the heavy runs like the head of Gudreaux and the head La Falise. :razz:

Green Ghost
02-27-2013, 08:56 AM
Hi All,

I saw an assortment of tube flies used by a strictly Spey Only Fisherman a couple years ago. I contested the fact that these are indeed weighted Flies. In my opinion, a Plastic tube would seem unweighted but a metal tube, not being part of the fly itself, makes me think these should be outlawed. An unethical fisherman could use such weighted materials very easily to foul hook visible fish.

I also noted during the same discussion that the Hooks Riding below the Tube / Pattern were extremely heavy gauge and that allthough they were small hooks, combined with a metallic tube, one would have a hard time not hooking the bottom in slower lies (where the fish actually tend to lie).

Why anyone would choose to use a weighted system like that on these endangered fish is simply a matter of taste.

Ethics are a personal choice.

Venture
02-28-2013, 03:53 PM
I think you would have a difficult time with all the wardens on the Gaspe if caught using a metal tube fly. And in the wrong hands, it would certainly be a deadly poaching tool.

But in the right hands, there is undoubtedly a great place for metal tubes and is as ethical and challenging as any fishing is. Throughout the world there are many rivers where it is essential to swing weighted flies or tubes especially in early season. I for one can attest to the challenges of fishing in cold high big water with sinking tips and metal tubes and flies. In those conditions the fish still always have the edge.

I'm planning on using some big plastic tubes in early season and see how they do. I wouldn't be surprised if they do well especially on the Matapedia in June.

wrke
03-01-2013, 07:48 AM
Bill -


What are the bonefish plans this year?

Juro,
headed to the Abacos in mid-april for a week . . . just got back from TdF, will spend 3 days on OP in late march.
Bill

Green Ghost
03-06-2013, 09:28 PM
Not much more to add, but weighted seems to me to be just that Weighted.

In fact, aren't floating lines with unweighted flies required in Quebec?? I realize that a number 2 double that is legal to use is heavy, but is legal.

I alos beleive that use of a sink tip or sinking line is outlawed as well despite modern advances in line manufacturing.

So I believe that artificially weighted lines are also outlawed, right?

How can a Metallic tube of an inch or so in length (and longer) be legal? It's weighted!

Be it May through September in Quebec, Floating lines and unweighted flies are the la,. that is my understanding.

If this is not so, please show me the regulation and your interpretation.

Green Ghost
03-06-2013, 09:29 PM
The LAW right?

flyspoke
03-07-2013, 06:56 AM
Green Ghost-Here is the clear ruling on lines and tubes.

http://www.mrn.gouv.qc.ca/english/publications/online/wildlife/fishing-regulations/general-regulations/fishing-methods.asp

The only sinking line that would be illegal would be a lead core style and tubes are clearly legal.

I do know that on Matane they have gone to floating line only. Not sure if this is a local rule or not.

Green Ghost
03-07-2013, 10:04 PM
Here is a copy of those regs for all to see, I guess I stand corrrected. thanks

I can tell you I am surprised and fish 50 % minimum with dry flies but a tube is clearly legal. on the fly lines the definition should be revised. I can fish non lead core lines that sink at 8-10 ips if I so choose. Crazy. the regulation is not current with technology. Just look at the description on flies and their components. I am amazed.


Fly fishing areas
Some bodies of water, generally located in zecs, are reserved for fly fishing. These bodies of water are identified as such at the registration post or near the fishing site. In these cases, when fly fishing, you must abide by the following rules:

fly fishing must be practiced by means of an unweighted fly line, mounted on a rod designed specifically for that type of fishing and to which a maximum of two artificial flies are attached. The two hooks combined can have a total of three points (see Weighted down line, page 3);
the artificial fly may be composed of a combination of hooks that must take into account the maximum authorized size of the hooks illustrated below; such a fly must never have more than three points;
the artificial fly must not be attached to a weighted core line (see Weighted core line, page 3);
flies may have attachments made of silk, tinsel, wool, fabric, fur, feathers or other similar materials. Brass, copper, aluminum or plastic tubes may be part of the fly, as well as a straight pin. Waddington shafts are authorized. Metal heads and eyes are forbidden;
flies must not have spinning or waving parts or be equipped with weights to facilitate sinking;
flies must not be baited, unless otherwise indicated in this publication;
the possession of any other fishing tackle is strictly forbidden on a body of water reserved for fly fishing or within 100 m of such a body of water, except:
when such tackle is found in a vehicle (except a boat) or a building;
when a person is only crossing or walking alongside waters reserved for fly fishing in order to fish in other waters where the use of that tackle is permitted. In this case, when the forbidden tackle is a hook other than an artificial fly, the latter must not be attached to the line and if this person is also in possession of a rod, it must be rendered inoperative in one of the following ways:
disassembled in sections;
assembled without a reel being attached to it;
stored in a closed case

Fontinalis
03-12-2013, 09:42 AM
I fish at least a couple of weeks in the early spring and sometimes a week in the fall in some of the Gaspe rivers (York, Dartmouth, St Jean, Petite Cascapedia). I agree that that sinking lines and heavy tubes have no place in low, clear water water conditions, but in early spring fishing when the water is very cold and high (last week of May, first week or two of June depending on snowpack and rainfall), using light sink tips and/or tubes can make the difference between being blanked for a week and a couple of hookups. The fish are most definitely not being flossed or snagged in these instances. These are conditions when many respected locals are fishing massive 3/0 salmon irons which are significantly heavier than the aluminum long tubes or brass micro tubes that I fish. When fishing tubes, I also use light short shank, micro or pinched barb tube hooks which do WAY less damage to the salmon than a 3/0 iron.
It comes down to ethics and river conditions. If the York is running dirty at 50-70cm/s and is 6 degrees C the last week of May, I'll be using my 2 hander with a light sink tip and aluminum tube flies since the fish won't move far for a fly even if they can even see it more than 2-3 feet away. If the river is at 15 cm/s and is 10-12 degrees C in mid June, it'll be floating lines and plastic tubes, regular wets, or dry flies for me.