So why do you like SRC? [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: So why do you like SRC?


Tin Pusher
05-31-2009, 12:31 PM
I just got back from 10 days of wading the flats for Bonefish and since I got home all I can think about is searching the the local beaches for SRC. I catch more, bigger and stronger fighting fish in the lakes but there is something mystical about SRC that I cannot put my finger on. They are here today gone tomorrow fish that can frustrate the hell out of the best anglers yet we keep coming back for more. I am in step one of my twelve step program to recovery which as we all know is admitting I have a problem. What is step two?:)

Eric
06-01-2009, 11:29 AM
Don't know if there is a Step-2.

I'm really concerned about the sea run cutthroat fishery here on Alsea Bay. Everyone I've talked with at ODFW seems to think the population is in good shape, but at this time of year, rise forms are usually quite in evidence on every low slack. This spring, I've seen very, very few. I've seen a couple of fish jumping on the incoming tide, but have had no luck enticing any to the fly.

Alsea Bay was once a world-class fishery for "blue backs" (local name for SRC's). Now, nothing. Supposedly there was a good fall run into the river last year and it's possible the majority of fish dropped from the river straight through the estuary and out to sea. We'll know later this summer, I guess.

One thing more is that the Bay is totally devoid of bait. No grass shrimp, no anchovies, no needlefish (candlefish), no nothing. Without bait I guess you can't have SRC's.

Good luck with your Puget Sound pursuits. SRC's are wonderful fish; I'm hoping things will improve here as the summer progresses.

Cheers,

Eric

Eric
06-01-2009, 11:38 AM
Don't know if there is a Step-2.

I'm really concerned about the sea run cutthroat fishery here on Alsea Bay. Everyone I've talked with at ODFW seems to think the population is in good shape, but at this time of year, rise forms are usually quite in evidence on every low slack. This spring, I've seen very, very few. I've seen a couple of fish jumping on the incoming tide, but have had no luck enticing any to the fly.

Alsea Bay was once a world-class fishery for "blue backs" (local name for SRC's). Now, nothing. Supposedly there was a good fall run into the river last year and it's possible the majority of fish dropped from the river straight through the estuary and out to sea. We'll know later this summer, I guess.

One thing more is that the Bay is totally devoid of bait. No grass shrimp, no anchovies, no needlefish (candlefish), no nothing. Without bait I guess you can't have SRC's.

Good luck with your Puget Sound pursuits. SRC's are wonderful fish; I'm hoping things will improve here as the summer progresses.

Cheers,

Eric

Tin Pusher
06-01-2009, 11:08 PM
Sorry to hear that Eric. Hopefully the bait comes back as the cutties should follow.

andre
06-02-2009, 12:50 AM
Why do we fish for anything magical? While in my heart nothing touches a chrome summer run, SRC are special in their own right.

KerryS
07-20-2009, 05:34 PM
.......because they are the last truly wild fish we have left. A connection to a time long past. Every time I connect with one I wonder at its beauty. Their ability to freely move from fresh to salt and back seemingly at will. Its spirit; the only fish I have caught that thinks it is 28 inches long when it is only 14. I hooked one on an eight weight 2 hander this last steelhead season on the Skagit. Too bad, it was, ounce for ounce, the best fight any fish gave me for several years. It put on an aerial show that any species would be proud of. Late summer/early fall I stop hunting for summer run steelhead for a time and concentrate my efforts to the searun cutthroat. Their spirit and tenacity are truly special. If searuns weighed in at 5 pounds or more we would never fish for steelhead.