Volcker, Maine Listing, Tracking - from ASF [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: Volcker, Maine Listing, Tracking - from ASF


salmonthink
10-28-2008, 01:39 PM
On Nov. 12, 2008 the Atlantic Salmon Federation will be honoring Paul Volcker at its New York Dinner. Paul Volcker is known as a giant in the world of economics. However he also has a passion for conservation, the environment and for Atlantic salmon. Check out details:
http://asf.ca/news.php?id=299

For an up-to-date article on Paul Volcker's most recent activities, go to:
http://online.wsj.com/article_email/SB122454498635252109-lMyQjAxMDI4MjI0MTUyNDE0Wj.html

Paul Volcker's Atlantic salmon interest is also mentioned on his Wikipedia page, along with his background, including an extended period as Chairman of the Federal Reserve.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Volcker

In Maine, federal authorities have announced public hearings taking place next week in Augusta and Brewer on the potential expanded listing for endangered status to Atlantic salmon populations in the Penobscot, Kennebec and Androscoggin rivers.
http://asf.ca/news.php?id=294

For more background, the U. S. government Atlantic salmon restoration page has links to the status report, and to the Federal Register sections on the endangered status.
http://www.nero.noaa.gov/prot_res/altsalmon/

Internationally, a major report detailing incidents and impacts of escaped farmed salmon has been released, and is available as a .pdf on ASF's website. ASF's Dr. Fred Whoriskey is one of the report authors. Go to:
http://asf.ca/news.php?id=298

The Atlantic Salmon Federation has been a pioneer in tracking salmon with acoustic tags, and this is helping to unravel the mystery of at-sea migration and mortality. Now using this technology, researchers on Canada's West Coast have tracked chinook salmon down the Columbia River and out to sea, and results were released yesterday. One article that provides some background is:
http://www.genengnews.com/news/bnitem.aspx?name=44297168

The acoustic tag technology continues to progress quickly, and is helping to expand our knowledge of many species - from Atlantic salmon to sharks and sea turtles.