The World's fisheries in 20 years... [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: The World's fisheries in 20 years...


Frogfish
02-02-2008, 11:30 AM
I just want to see what many of you guys think about this topic...

How healthy do you think the world's fisheries (especially for the fly fisherman) will be in, say, 20 years? How will the GLs be? Costa Rica? Maybe the Seychelles?

Will the conservation at the and other places keep the fishing great for generations to come, or are some places in such danger that our children may not be able to fish them?

Galong
02-02-2008, 10:55 PM
Unfortunately I see no reason to be anything but pessimistic about the future of any aspect of Nature. We are in the middle of the 6th major extinct and this one is man-made... whether you want to believe that or not.

The rule is simple: you can't have an infinite number of consumers on finite resources.

Stop eating seafood and the fisheries might last a bit longer. :)

teflon_jones
02-04-2008, 10:38 AM
I'm with Galong, I don't really see any hope. The Japanese out there hunting 1,000 whales for "scientific purposes" is a perfect example of why we're on a downward spiral that isn't going to stop any time soon. It'll take the total crash of the fisheries to wake people up, like happened in the Grand Banks, and even then, things will never be allowed to recover to where they need to be. They'll be allowed to recover just enough to be considered healthy by some guy sitting behind a desk in Washington. The next crash will be worse, and the next recovery will be smaller before the fishery is reopened. And so on and so on.

I've actually stopped buying tuna because I feel guilty. I still enjoy a nice farm-raised fish though. :)

Frogfish
02-04-2008, 08:16 PM
DO you think the protected fisheries like those of Costa Rica, Eleuthera, the Seychelles, and others will be affected by this?

teflon_jones
02-05-2008, 11:27 PM
Absolutely Frogfish. The oceans are one huge interconnected and interdependent ecosystem. The overharvesting of sharks worldwide must be having a huge impact on all oceans. Remove the dominant predator from any ecosystem and look what happens. I'm not a marine biologist, nor have I studied those locations very much Frogfish, but it doesn't take a genius to figure out that fish stocks worldwide are dropping. I wonder sometimes how long it'll be before man wipes himself out. I just hope it happens before we wipe everything else out! Maybe then the dinosaurs will come back. ;)

Frogfish
02-06-2008, 04:11 PM
Thanks for the reply teflon jones! Hopefully we can protect and save some of our fisheries...

Sean Juan
02-06-2008, 04:33 PM
Look there is no point to this...

Everyone knows that an asteroid will strike the Earth on April 13th 2029 - I suspect fishing will pretty much suck after that...deny it if you must but the Discovery Channel and the History Channel (which apparently should become the FUTURE Channel) will back me up. Who will back you up, TLC? LOGO? the best you can hope for is the SciFi channel.

Thats assuming we (humanity) survive beyond December 21st 2012 the last day - the VERY LAST - on the Mayan calander.

So 20 years from now I'm running around in a Rabbit Pelt jockstrap like Thundar the Barbarian with Ookla the Mok...I called it. Unless Tina Turner is still around to chase me on a trike with slinky's for earrings - I'm going to keep my options open.


Honestly I strongly suspect freshwater fishing will be much better in 20 years, and saltwater will be much worse. Most of the vile polluting of Freshwater - and acid rain - has been corrected (most not all) stands to reason things will get better. The big downfall of the oceans will be sea-shore development areas that were baitfish nurseries are becomming condos and hotels - without places to spawn the base of the food web the whole ecosystem will be reduced (or drastically changed - species that spawn off-shore may experience a great abundance.)

Chin up guys - people do learn from their mistakes and things are getting better - doubtful they will ever be as good as there once were before man's mechanized existence - but I think things are much better than they were 20 years ago.

Frogfish
02-06-2008, 08:42 PM
Nice post Sean! Has anyone told you you should write a book? :p

Galong
02-06-2008, 09:17 PM
Honestly I strongly suspect freshwater fishing will be much better in 20 years, and saltwater will be much worse. Most of the vile polluting of Freshwater - and acid rain - has been corrected (most not all) stands to reason things will get better.
.
Um, sorry, I strongly disagree. The fact of the matter is that "most" of the "vile polluting" is still happening and it is being compounded with fertilizers, pesticides, additional CO2 in the atmosphere (which is acidic), additional high levels of CO (Carbon monoxide) and Methane.

Furthermore, the human population is still on the increase which means more people feeding on somewhat finite resources. I see more potential freshwater fishermen, not fewer, so that's more pressure on the freshwater fish stock.

Sorry, environmentally speaking, there is very little good news.

Sean Juan
02-06-2008, 10:36 PM
Galong you're right and I'm wrong...

Actually I'm right...

Actually actually it depends primarily on where in the world you are....

Most manufacturing (and the accompanying pollution) was exported to Asia and in the next 20 years most likely to Africa.

I live in New England - where many dams are being removed, most mills have closed, and laws enacted to protect the environment.

Fishing in our rivers now is much better than it was in the 80's - salmon runs are slowly being restored - and native species are starting to get the protection they need.

Thats all very good news, and the people who worked hard to accomplish it should be commended.

Alternative energy sources - wind, solar (especially solar pannels in space) nuclear, and heck maybe even anti-matter are all being studied and progress is being made - probably not in the next 20 years but eventually fossil fuels will be fossils themselves.

Now I'm not saying its all sunshine and rainbows but a pessimistic view is no more realistic than an entirely optomistic one, but humans are learning to live with nature better and better each day - heck catch and release is far more accepted now than it was in days past and likely will be even more in the future.

juro
02-06-2008, 11:32 PM
I'd like to offer some meaningful dialog but... I'm still stuck on the rabbit pelt and Tina Turner with slinky earrings... :Eyecrazy:

:lildevl:

Galong
02-07-2008, 06:18 PM
Most manufacturing (and the accompanying pollution) was exported to Asia and in the next 20 years most likely to Africa.

I live in New England - where many dams are being removed, most mills have closed, and laws enacted to protect the environment.

I'm not sure I follow this. I am pretty sure that most manufacturing is done in Asia where labor is cheap (see Wallmart :p ) and I don't see how the pollution accompanies manufacturing. What am I missing?

You're fortunate to live in a small part of the world that seems to care, but the climate, air pollution, etc from everyone else will eventually damage your little haven. ;)

The Stripers in the Chesapeake Bay are back after decades of mismanagement and/or over-fishing, but overall, the world's fisheries are suffering. Yes, there are small victories, but the big picture looks pretty bleak... IMHO