Proper storage of line and leaders [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: Proper storage of line and leaders


Galong
01-11-2008, 09:53 PM
I was wondering if any of you store your fly line or leaders somewhere other than on the reel? I'm wondering if putting the line/s on a larger round object would help eliminate line memory... or is this something that I should not have to consider with high quality line?

My tapered leaders seem to not lay straight in the water. I've tried pulling the leaders through a cut piece of inner tube rubber (heard that would help), but it didn't seem to make a difference.

Thanks,
Dave

teflon_jones
01-12-2008, 02:10 AM
I use all premium fly lines and I don't really have any problems with line memory. The lines might have a little memory if I haven't used them in a few months, but it quickly disappears after a little casting.

The tapered leaders show more memory, but I've found that using large arbor reels limits this quite a bit. But it's still there and can be frustrating sometimes! One big thing I've noticed is the leaders get a lot more memory if they're stretched tight around the spool during storage. Leave them on the spool loose and they do a lot better.

Galong
01-12-2008, 02:17 AM
Thanks Scott,

As usual, a quick and helpful reply. :)

Warren
01-12-2008, 05:55 AM
I usually leave the line on the spool. if for some reason I have it off I just store it in a loop tied with pipe cleaners to keep everything from tangling up and I label them and put in a plastic sandwich bag.

I have the best luck pulling a leader through my fingers a few times, press hard enough to generate a little heat and the leader will usually straighten out nicely.

Galong
01-12-2008, 06:46 AM
Thanks Warren, have you ever heard of pulling the leader through a piece of rubber, such as a cut-out from an inner tube? Do you think the finger method would be just as good?

Thanks,
Dave

Redfisher
01-12-2008, 08:40 AM
Galong

Pulling a leader through a piece of inner tube has been a prescribed method for staightening a leader since as far back as I can remember and I've been fly fishing for about 56 years. It usually works but you have to pull hard enough to stretch the leader material and generate some heat. As Warren pointed out I believe heat is a major factor in the straightening process. If it doesn't work it probably means the leader material has "dried out" and should be replaced.

Hope this helps!
Dan

P.S. If anyone has a better way please chime in. Your never too old to learn!!!

Galong
01-12-2008, 09:03 AM
Thanks Dan,

I probably remember hearing about this rubber method from a zillion years ago... when I was young. I'm just getting back into flyfishing and loving every minute of it.

I reckon my next step is to give the fingers a try.

Cheers,
Dave

Warren
01-12-2008, 12:21 PM
Thanks Warren, have you ever heard of pulling the leader through a piece of rubber, such as a cut-out from an inner tube? Do you think the finger method would be just as good?

Thanks,
Dave

Dave I have heard of that, and they actually sell things here called leader straighteners, rubber and leather flap thingy. Lefty Kreh claims they damage the leader. Dunno if that is true or not.

Also when I use my fingers I can feel any bad spots that could cause a failure in service. probably the best reason to use the old fingers

teflon_jones
01-12-2008, 11:16 PM
I've never used a leader straightener, but I've also thrown out a few leaders that may have been saved if I did. I use really light leaders (7x usually, or 5x at the heaviest) and they tend to have much less memory through most of them than heavier leaders. I'm also primarily a streamer fisherman so the drag of the streamer straightens out any curls in the leader pretty easily.

Then again, I used to fish primarily with dry flies and I never used a leader straightener then either. I found that pulling it through my fingers really tightly would straighten out a lot of curls, or at least make them straight enough to fish with it.

On a side note, does anybody know if flourocarbon or mono leaders have more memory? What about furled?

Galong
01-13-2008, 05:14 AM
I've sort of stuck with store-bought tapered leaders. Perhaps I should try to make some of my own and see how they compare.

I'm a bit concerned about having two or three knots in a home-made leader. Knots are the weakest point aren't they?

Thanks,
Dave

juro
01-13-2008, 09:20 AM
The proper way to straighten a leader is without contest, a very large fish.

:smokin:

Warren
01-13-2008, 06:56 PM
The proper way to straighten a leader is without contest, a very large fish.

:smokin:


I guess that puts this topic to rest:D

teflon_jones
01-14-2008, 12:25 PM
I've sort of stuck with store-bought tapered leaders. Perhaps I should try to make some of my own and see how they compare.I've been using the factory tapered kind for almost 20 years. They're simple, easy, and work really well. They can be a little pricey, but luckily for me I picked up a 10 year supply for 75% off at an Orvis store that was going out of business.

I'm a bit concerned about having two or three knots in a home-made leader. Knots are the weakest point aren't they?Yes, normally they are. However, I've had very few cases of my admittedly poor knots breaking. I don't even use the correct types of knots and they hold. I tie 2 improved clinch knots back to back when I attach tippet and they hold just fine, even in 7X tippet.

juro
01-14-2008, 01:08 PM
The blood knots in your hand-made leader butt, taper sections will never fail before your tippet knot unless you tie them so badly they defy simple physics i.e. big fat line knots are stronger than skinny tippet knots. Kind of hard to defy that but I guess it's possible. Furthermore the weakest point is usually the terminal knot (at the fly), and if you are still using a clinch definitely so.

So once you replace a tippet, it's safe to say that the hand made leader is no weaker than the one-piece at 10% of the price (if that).

It allows you to use only sparse portions of flourocarbon (e.g. tippet only) which is not the best thing for the environment or the wallet.

But much more importantly, tying your own leaders teaches you a tremendous amount and makes you a better angler over time. Leader design affects casting, presentation and handling of fish. It teaches you to recognize the feedback you might otherwise ignore or miss, make corrections and improve.

That, in my opinion, is what makes one angler better than another - the number of iterations one has improved their technique based on recognition of the available feedback.

Galong
01-14-2008, 08:08 PM
Thanks guys, it looks like I'll make some leaders myself and give it a try.

boatdrinks
01-02-2014, 08:54 AM
lines I don't use very often, I take off the reel and coil up like an extension cord (18" diameter circle or so) I then just hang them from a nail in the basement. Lines I use at least once a month I just keep on the reel and stretch out before using if I go a week or two.

Green Ghost
02-05-2014, 12:24 AM
On Fly Lines:

I clean them daily if in Salt water use.
I replace them when dirty, cracked or not performing.
I do not seem to have a lot of memory from storage on the spool unless the fly line needs replacement.
It is possible to twist the line whilst coiling and storing it.
I do believe that routine cleaning helps the line last.


On leaders:

I usually keep the heavier butt section in tact and replace everything from there down religiously.
I replace all Tippet after every significant fish. (always on Atlantics).
Terminal Tackle Failure is unacceptable and the direct responsibility of the angler.
I try to Tie near perfect knots, if the wraps don't come together right I cut it off and re tie the Knot.

Sure, I use a lot of tippet, but I don't often lose a fish for a bad knot. (wish I could say it was never).

We have limited time to Fly fish, I like to get it as right as I can.

The Rest is Up to The Fish!