Tiny Tuna [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: Tiny Tuna


striblue
11-19-2007, 09:49 AM
Here is a small tuna caught by a friend in Chatham. H. Emery with N. Nickerson standing behind at the Chatham fish pier...not on a fly rod (I think I didn't have to say that) but quite a fish and paid for fuel for many more trips .

striblue
11-19-2007, 09:53 AM
Another Pic!

jimS
11-19-2007, 10:15 AM
If handled correctly, worth BIG bucks in the Tokyo fish market. Thanks for sharing.

striblue
11-19-2007, 10:30 AM
Jim, that's exactly where it went.

petevicar
11-19-2007, 12:27 PM
Hi John

Wow!! what a great fish.
How big was it?
It's difficult to tell from the photos.

Pete

striblue
11-19-2007, 12:44 PM
I did not get details from the sender, but the guy is standing right next to it in each picture.. shoulder or arm touching it.

Striper
11-19-2007, 05:07 PM
That's ginormous! I would guess 600+ or better????

wrke
11-19-2007, 06:49 PM
Gorgeous fish. Congrats to the angler . . . certainly a fish of a lifetime.

But . . . I'm sorry whenever I see BFT of this size eliminated from the gene pool. I would hope that we "enlightened" sportsmen would show more restraint when pursuing fish that are so endangered.

You know, we really do have a responsibility larger than ourselves.

Bill

sean
11-19-2007, 08:17 PM
But . . . I'm sorry whenever I see BFT of this size eliminated from the gene pool. I would hope that we "enlightened" sportsmen would show more restraint when pursuing fish that are so endangered.

You know, we really do have a responsibility larger than ourselves.

Well be the first to start an enlightened fisherman trend, hang up your rods. Higher percentage of tuna around than the steelhead and salmon you list in your profile as pursuing.

-sean

striblue
11-19-2007, 08:20 PM
Take it easy Bill.... not to argue but have you ever kept a fish? Maybe the real issue is the large commercial tuna fleets, (and not the sportsman), from all over the world, especially those that violate our waters, for say... 200 of those type of fish in one trip. If you have never kept a large salmon or any other species you fish for then I respect your point... but please tell me you have NEVER kept any fish in your fishing lifetime. I ask this because it sounds that you have never done so. I really did not think for one moment that I would garner that response from my post... Thanks for reminding me of responsibility. PS..can any of you tuna guys explain to me how you can release such a fish with all lactic acid build up...my thinking is that it would go belly up in about 5 minutes. I would have lip it, lifted it up , and slowly revived it by leaning overboard with it in both hand naturally, and let it go...but that's me.

wrke
11-19-2007, 08:45 PM
Sean/Striblue

Certainly I've kept fish, but in all my 30+ years of fishing steelhead, I've only killed one . . . that I tried to revive . . . to no avail. It was in Kamchatka as part of the Kamchatka Steelhead Project (a 20 yr. research program developed by the Wild Salmon Center and Moscow State University). Fortunately, the Russian government allowed 10 fish killed per season as part of the program (a certain number were allowed for further research . . otolith bones, etc). BTW, it was delicious. I've never, ever killed a mature Atlantic salmon. They're way, way too valuable (as are mature BFT). I have killed a few (very few) precocious male grilse.

Just because BFT are taken by commercial fisheries doesn't make it right for enlightened fishermen to take them. I don't know how you can justify taking a mature bluefin.

And yes, salmon are among our most important food sources . . . not farmed raised ones, but wild Alaskan chinook. I have two Copper River fish FedEx'd to me every year. While it might be counter-intuitive to you, it's the best way to preserve this wonderful wild salmon fishery. The Alaskan fisheries are the most highly regulated in the world and (although expensive) it's the best way to provide for a profitable, well-managed sustainable fishery.

Unfortunately, such is not the case for the highly endangered bluefin.

wrke
11-19-2007, 08:58 PM
PS..can any of you tuna guys explain to me how you can release such a fish with all lactic acid build up...my thinking is that it would go belly up in about 5 minutes. I would have lip it, lifted it up , and slowly revived it by leaning overboard with it in both hand naturally, and let it go...but that's me.

John, that's another reason I'd not fish for them. I imagine it's nearly impossible to release one because of the enormous fight they give.

I can only imagine they're false albacore times 100. FA are very difficult to release especially those caught by flyfishing. And yes, contrary to popular opinion, FA are absolutely delicious as sashimi within a very few hours of landing. But I've never seen a package of that size with as much blood or a fish that spoils faster.

(And with all due respect, FA are not endangered).

Bill

striblue
11-19-2007, 09:05 PM
OK, Ok, Whatever. From a practical point of view I suppose the fisherman should have just cut the line after about 5 minutes into the hook up....or at the point he discovered that the fish was a blue fin and was that big....or "hoped" that any blue fin in the area did not grab the bait or just not gone after them in the first place. I just don't see how it could have survived., so why bother fishing for them in the first place.

sean
11-19-2007, 09:10 PM
I grew up in alaska. Over 50% of the returning fish are hatchery bred ( a lot of em are called 'wild' ) so do not fool yourself into thinking wild alaska salmon are some panacea of sustainable fishing practices. The best in the world yes but not sustainable long term unless some changes happen. The levels of hatchery to native fish rise almost every year. Guess it may be seem easier to justify you are paying double to have them fedexed to you.

At least 5% of any caught fish dies so add it up, you have killed more fish than you think you have. I find that precious mature hen quebec salmon just as important as a bluefin, but you know what...we are all fisherman and there will be blood. It just leaves a sour taste in my mouth when one fisherman tries separate himself from that fact. By all means do what you personally can to help the fisheries but condemning others doing the same as yourself (especially in the eyes of the outside world) does not work for me. You are in or you are out.

FA are very difficult to release — especially those caught by flyfishing.

BS I can land one just as fast as with spinning gear...if not quicker. The fly rod is a much better fighting tool than a spin rod. Sean MCD was landing small bluefin(60-70lbs) in 1/2 the time as most people do on spin gear. It is just easier to do.

-sean

wrke
11-19-2007, 10:22 PM
I grew up in alaska. Over 50% of the returning fish are hatchery bred ( a lot of em are called 'wild' ) so do not fool yourself into thinking wild alaska salmon are some panacea of sustainable fishing practices. The best in the world yes but not sustainable long term unless some changes happen. The levels of hatchery to native fish rise almost every year. Guess it may be seem easier to justify you are paying double to have them fedexed to you.

At least 5% of any caught fish dies so add it up, you have killed more fish than you think you have. I find that precious mature hen quebec salmon just as important as a bluefin, but you know what...we are all fisherman and there will be blood. It just leaves a sour taste in my mouth when one fisherman tries separate himself from that fact. By all means do what you personally can to help the fisheries but condemning others doing the same as yourself (especially in the eyes of the outside world) does not work for me. You are in or you are out.



BS I can land one just as fast as with spinning gear...if not quicker. The fly rod is a much better fighting tool than a spin rod. Sean MCD was landing small bluefin(60-70lbs) in 1/2 the time as most people do on spin gear. It is just easier to do.

-sean

Not condemning anyone, it was just an observation about a mature adult of a critically endangered species that was killed. The sour taste is your problem, not mine. Of course, it's a blood sport I know my effect and I take my responsibility seriously.

striblue
11-20-2007, 07:04 AM
Bill,I have a better idea. I posted a picture of a friend in Chatham...with his fish... why not start a separate thread on the subject and say off this one if you didn't like the pic or why he caught it. Why does everything have a political moral issue attached to it.... reminds me of the poor lttle kid in grammer school who accidently touches another kid and everyone cries sexual harasment....It WAS a Picture of a guy and his Fish...that's all...please keep the issue OFF my thread that I started and set up your own on the subject...thank you very much! (Please spare me the "dampening" of first amendment rights also...just do it on another thread, that's all)

wrke
11-20-2007, 09:16 AM
John
It was with a little trepidation that I posted my comment, but all I said was that I was sorry whenever I see BFT of this size eliminated from the gene pool. Hey, it was a personal comment that's all not a flame. Hell, I think I even said congrats to the angler. I certainly think it was a fair observation with regard to one of the most endangered fish on the planet. Done.
Bill

striblue
11-20-2007, 09:25 AM
Bill, Yes, you are correct and I understand.. and I am sure you see that my purpose was to just share the picture. I am not naive as to the opening of issues relating to the picture, nor aginst it, so I opened another thread for further discussions on the matter.

Jim Miller
11-20-2007, 10:34 AM
Now that's a TUNA! :eek:

polareyez
11-20-2007, 11:47 AM
John,

Reminds me of the 2 we caught on the last rip trip....Although I think yours may have been a little larger than the one pictured:Eyecrazy:

Sephon
11-21-2007, 12:26 AM
John,

That is an awesome fish, I'm glad to see that someone who enjoys their passion as much as we love our passions can share their pictures and not be judged...

http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb157/SephonBWindcraft/soap_box.gif

-Chris

Warren
11-21-2007, 04:39 AM
Mmmmmmm Tasty looking. Tuna Steaks anyone?

striblue
11-21-2007, 09:01 AM
I posted on the other thread in response to one by Bill and Jim but wanted to put another pic up. I said in that post that this guy brought this in alone and has triple screws and goes out SOLO (with his dog). Like Carlos Benta's book and his quest for marlin solo.... Multiple rods and he even was able to snap a picture as best as he could with the rod in the other hand. He knows how to handle a boat also and I have been out with him when he decides to take someone out. He is quite a fisherman and I have seen many but this guy is in a class by himself. IMHO (...and certainly not the type of guy I would ever give a lecture to on the subject)

gunner
11-21-2007, 12:48 PM
He brought that in Solo!!! :Eyecrazy: The man deserves a bow. I don't see one in the smiles or I'd add it.
Joe

striblue
11-21-2007, 01:28 PM
I have been getting some report that Nick Nickerson was with him but I will check that out. Nevertheless he does most solo.

wrke
11-21-2007, 09:29 PM
An amazing feat . . . and pic. Thanks.
Bill