Old L.L.Bean Rod/True Temper Reel questions [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: Old L.L.Bean Rod/True Temper Reel questions


Quentin
11-11-2007, 11:18 AM
My girlfriend's uncle recently died and I was given a bunch of his fishing gear, including a relatively old L.L. Bean fly rod with a True Temper Tempest 160 reel. The rod has an L.L. Bean sticker but no other markings to identify the model or line weight. It's a 2-pc, 7.5' fiberglass rod with aluminum screw-down reel seat. The hook holder on the rod is different than any I've seen before. Among the rest of the gear is an old fly line that still has the original tag identifying the line as nylon Royal Trout Fly Line, Size D, made by the U.S. Line Co. in Westfield, MA.

Does anyone know how to determine the approximate age of the rod & reel? Assuming that the old line is the correct line for that rod, what line weight is equivalent to "size D"?

I'm not trying to evaluate this for ebay, I'm just curious.

Thanks for any and all info you can provide.

Q

Here are some pics:

Quentin
11-11-2007, 11:19 AM
The hook holder:

Quentin
11-11-2007, 11:20 AM
and the reel:

vtloon
11-11-2007, 07:45 PM
Hey Quentin, how's it going? The line you're asking about sounds like a D size level line (i.e. no taper...don't expect it to cast real well) Notice I said SIZE; they used to go by diameter, and depending on the material/construction the weight could vary quite a bit between manufacturers. Most likely, that D is about a 6 weight. If it were a double taper, it would be an HDH. Good luck. My first fly rod was a True Temper tubular steel rod (real lightweight wonder).
Todd

Quentin
11-15-2007, 09:41 PM
Hi Todd,

Thanks for the info about the line. Interesting that your first fly rod was a True Temper tubular rod. When I was doing some searches I saw that they made some rods, but there wasn't much about reels. I did see that they were known for their hand tools and made history for having the first corporate execs to serve jail time for price fixing :hihi: . Were they well-known for fishing gear in their time? And what was the rod like for casting??

Q

PopnesetBay
11-15-2007, 10:43 PM
I bet if you sent an inquiry to Cortland Line Co., they could give you some specs on the "old" way of classify-ing lines and todays equivalents. In 1949, at the age of 13, I got a "casting lesson" from Ted Williams (Red Sox #9) at the old New England Sportsman Show, in Mechanics Hall, Boston. One of the first things he said to me was that I would be better if I had an "HDH" line for my HI, Bamboo Rod. With the innocence of youth, I told him that it took all my "Christmas money and allowances" to pay for the bus ticket and admission so I hoped it would be a bad rest of the winter and maybe I could earn enough shovelling snow to afford the line. When we left the casting pool he marched me over to the Cortland booth, asked for a "HDH" line, handed it to me and told me to follow the care instructions every time I used it and to "Practice, dammit, practice". Said that he would take care of the line with Cortland and for me to "skiedaddle". I will always remember him for that, as much as I will remember his baseball legacy.

Quentin
11-15-2007, 11:00 PM
Wow, that's a great story!

Q

vtloon
11-16-2007, 08:57 AM
"What was it like to cast"? I don't really know...probably a lot like their shovels; at that stage I was just trying to whip the rod back and forth like it showed in Field & Stream.
Also from the same source (Grandfather) I had two True Temper steel baitcasting rods....they were pretty good rods.

Ol Rich
11-16-2007, 01:54 PM
I still have the True Temper rod my dad used with a Shakespeare Automatic reel loaded with a level fly line to bounce worms. The rod has landed many trout from Colorado streams and rivers. I have not tried to cast a fly line on it. He did convert to a fiberglass rod and spin reel in his later years.

Rich