Striped Bass a Gamefish... [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: Striped Bass a Gamefish...


Smcdermott
10-19-2007, 03:15 PM
http://obsentinel.womacknewspapers.com/articles/2007/10/17/top_stories/tops0761.txt


Sean

flydoc
10-19-2007, 04:52 PM
That's all well and good, but what REALLY needs to happen is more funding for more fisheries officers to ENFORCE the regulations...otherwise the "rogue" shoreline baitchunkers will continue to cart off increasing numbers of fish, many of them not of legal size:tsk_tsk:
Flydoc

FredA
10-19-2007, 05:13 PM
I smell a tit-for tat (quid pro quo) coming, pogies better run and hide.

sean
10-19-2007, 05:19 PM
Dunno about this one...

Recreational anglers take far more stripers than commercials do. Much more, especially when you add in the laughable 'commercial' season the rec guys have. The problem bass will face down the road will be angler induced unless some changes happen as far as limits and size are concerned. I see many more bass being hauled away by anglers within the law than by illegal means. Current regs give the anglers way too many fish right now imho. Would rather see a reduction on the rec front and leave the commercials alone for now. Commericals have sacrificed much more than recreational anglers to get the stocks back. Time for us to step up.

Also sucks to see Bush jumping in for species that are not really suffering right now, would like to see them do something about salmon and steelhead stocks which are adversely effected by commercial and recreational seasons.

-sean

FishHawk
10-19-2007, 06:19 PM
I totally agree with Sean . What is not being said here is that there is a very large commercial fish farm which is behind the making of the Striped Bass a game fish . They would be the ones raising the fish for commercial use and putting the small commercial guys out of business. While making a huge profit. FishHawk just my .02

Warren
10-19-2007, 06:45 PM
Sean, Thanks for the link.

The debate will no doubt rage on over this. Taking the livelihood or a portion of his earnings of a commercial fisherman away is not the answer in my book. The commercial fisherman has taken it hard in the past several years. I know the blame for over harvest, poor management, underfunded enforcement etc...lies in many places & there is no easy solution.

I am still confounded why we cannot keep smaller schoolie size bass and can slaughter as many large breeding fish as we can manage to catch. I am all for a slot limit such as Maine uses. For both commercial & recreational fisherman. It just makes sense to me, unless someone can prove otherwise why that is not a sound management practice.

More enforcement would be nice to catch poachers, but how much more can we be taxed to pay for it? Additional fees or saltwater licensing will just be siphoned off and wasted like any other tax we pay. Like I said there is no easy solution. I really wish there was. Unfortunately there is not a larger percentage of recreational fishermen, politicians and bureaucrats that think like a catch & release fly fisher.

Upon further review:
It appears that this executive order is for Federal Waters 3 miles out to 200 miles. I am totally confused now. The internet sucks.... too much information:Eyecrazy: Does anyone really know what is going on here?

Paxton
10-19-2007, 07:18 PM
Warren...re "more enforcement " on poachers...did you forget that Doc is available on alternate weekends? :hihi:
I totally agree with your tax opinion...I would pay for a license only if my money was marked and could be traced to see if it went to fund what it was supossed to fund.
Ron

jfbasser
10-20-2007, 02:21 AM
The internet sucks.... too much information:Eyecrazy: Does anyone really know what is going on here?

The Internet-based Web pages should be used for recreational purposes, only :smokin:

mikez
10-20-2007, 07:20 AM
I don't believe it is true.
Look at the source of the info - commercial mouthpiece.
I think it's a scare tactic to color public opinion against any possible threat to the commercials.
I would find it VERY hard to believe that the current administration is contemplating ANY meaningful conservation legislation.
On the other hand, just how big is this "very large commercial fish farm"? They aren't owned by Halliburten by any chance are they?

FWIW, I'd rather see them go a little more conservative on the rec harvest [especially the Mass com/rec debacle] and put more $$$ and effort into fixing the pollution issues in the spawning grounds. Also I'd rather see more restrictions on bunker boats etc.
Hey, maybe that "very large commercial fish farm" could start producing lobster bait and pet food. That would be win win all around!

mikez
10-20-2007, 07:39 AM
After looking a little further it seems the plan is to ban harvest from federal waters???
Woah! That takes courage! Next thing you know, he'll put a ban on drunk driving.:lildevl:

flydoc
10-20-2007, 08:15 AM
The commercials are regulated and much of the enforcement efforts are directed towards them....the rec fisherman are regulated, but not nearly as enforced. I have witnessed striper poaching on several occasions by shoreline baitchunkers (usually while fishing Plum Island)...reported once, but no action was taken before the poachers were long gone. I agree with any regs that would improve the fishery, but they would need to be ENFORCED, both rec and commercial. Otherwise, it's like having laws with few cops around...
Flydoc

JimW
10-20-2007, 09:12 AM
Save the bait Save the Striper. Providing a clean habitat and enough food supply might be a better place to start.

There's a mid water trolling issue over on reel time I suggest everyone who would spend time reading this tread take a look over there and send off an email/letter/fax in regards to your position on it.

It won't matter much legislation or enforcement is put in place if they have nothing to eat.

Guernseybass
10-20-2007, 01:37 PM
Save the bait Save the Striper.

It won't matter much legislation or enforcement is put in place if they have nothing to eat.


make sure your reps vote FOR this then :



H. R. 3840
To prohibit commercial fishing of Atlantic menhaden for reduction purposes in inland, State, and Federal waters along the Atlantic coast of the United States, and for other purposes.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

October 16, 2007
Mr. SAXTON (for himself and Mr. GILCHREST) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Natural Resources


A BILL
To prohibit commercial fishing of Atlantic menhaden for reduction purposes in inland, State, and Federal waters along the Atlantic coast of the United States, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This Act may be cited as the `Atlantic Menhaden Conservation Act' .

SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

The Congress finds the following:

(1) Atlantic menhaden are a key piece of the Atlantic ecosystem, from Florida to Maine.

(2) Serving as a vital link in the food chain, Atlantic menhaden are a primary source of food for striped bass, bluefish, weakfish, Spanish mackerel, seals, and whales, and are favored by seabirds like loons and ospreys.

(3) Atlantic menhaden help maintain water quality by feeding on plankton and decaying plants. In aggregate in the Chesapeake Bay, these valuable living resources have the ability to filter a volume of water equal to the entire bay in less than one day.

(4) The Chesapeake Bay, the biggest estuary in North America, is a prime Atlantic menhaden nursery ground for the whole east coast, yet populations there are at historic lows. Juvenile fish are especially low, which is a key indicator of a dwindling population.

(5) The Chesapeake Bay is also a major spawning ground for striped bass, which are popular with anglers. Many striped bass in the bay are suffering from malnutrition and disease, and the declining Atlantic menhaden population may be a big factor.

(6) Industrial harvests of Atlantic menhaden for reduction purposes are the primary source of fishing mortality.

(7) In 2006, Addendum III to the Interstate Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic menhaden established a precautionary cap on harvesting of Atlantic menhaden . However, there is no scientific basis to establish whether the level of harvest allowed by such plan is sustainable.

(8) More research and studies are needed to determine the health of Atlantic menhaden populations, but the danger signs clearly point to the need for protection measures now for what is often called the most important fish in the sea.


get writing chaps, other websites are already :wink:

nmbrowncom
10-20-2007, 09:51 PM
just a point on the amount of striped bass taken by the recreationals v the commercials. according to the atlantic states marine fisheries assoc, commercials take 81% of the striped bass harvest. i have not seen the methodology for the stats however.

RayStachelek
10-20-2007, 10:34 PM
If they ban commercial fishing it doesn't effect the quotos so much. What's commercial fishing anyway about 10% (guessing)?

What it would effect is the sale of illigal stripers on the black market. That would be a good thing. No one really knows how prolific the black market really is.

That in itself would add to the striper stock.

Penguin
10-21-2007, 09:09 AM
I've seen quasi "commercial" guys who kill 40" breeders so they can pay for running their boats and keeping the fridge stocked with beer...:mad:
35 or 40 prime mega-stripes stacked up like cord wood...as if there's no tomorrow! :Eyecrazy:
Lot's of selling fish under the table AND going out a second time later in the day to do it again...:tsk_tsk:
The black market is alive and well and maybe this will rain on the parade!
I'll believe it when I see it...:roll:

Penguin
10-21-2007, 12:31 PM
Now if they can only protect the food forage...

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE October 20, 2007 CONTACT: Ted Venker, 1-800-201-FISH

President Orders Gamefish Status for Red Drum, Striped Bass

Executive Order creates legacy of conservation

ST. MICHAELS, MD - Surrounded by conservationists and anglers on the shores of historic Chesapeake Bay, President Bush today signed an Executive Order establishing gamefish status for red drum and striped bass in federal waters. The Order is a landmark victory for recreational anglers who have fought for decades to restore and conserve two of the most coveted sport fish in America.

"With this action, the President has secured a legacy for the recreational anglers and conservationists who have worked so hard on behalf of our marine resources," said Walter W. Fondren III, chairman of Coastal Conservation Association. "When CCA began to work on recovering red drum 30 years ago in Texas, we never imagined an event like this would ever be possible. We owe a debt of gratitude to the President for recognizing the high value placed on these resources by the citizens of this country."


U.S. Presidents have issued executive orders since 1789, usually to help direct the operation of executive officers. The Executive Order signed today by President Bush instructs the Secretary of Commerce to put regulations in place establishing gamefish status for red drum and striped bass in federal waters, and encourages the states to take similar actions in state waters.

"From the darkest days of overfishing in the late 1970s and early '80s, hundreds of thousands of people have worked tirelessly to conserve these resources," said David Cummins, president of CCA. "The President today has delivered the only reward that mattered to any of them - a better future for the resources they cherish."

President George W. Bush signs an Executive Order to protect the striped bass and red drum fish populations Saturday, Oct. 20, 2007, at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md. President Bush is joined during the signing by, from left, Michael Nussman, president of American Sportfishing Association; Brad Burns, president of Stripers Forever; David Pfeifer, president of Shimano America Corp.; Walter Fondren, chairman of Coastal Conservation Association; U.S. Secretary of Commerce Carlos Gutierrez; U.S. Rep. Wayne Gilchrest of Maryland and U.S. Secretary of Interior Dirk Kempthorne.

http://votervoice.net/target.aspx?id=coastal:19003137

Dble Haul
10-22-2007, 08:46 AM
That's all well and good, but what REALLY needs to happen is more funding for more fisheries officers to ENFORCE the regulations...otherwise the "rogue" shoreline baitchunkers will continue to cart off increasing numbers of fish, many of them not of legal size:tsk_tsk:
Flydoc

With all due respect, it's not just baitchuckers who do this. There are plenty of artificial lure and (heaven forbid) flyfishers who keep more than they need and break the rules too.

PEC54
10-22-2007, 09:24 AM
that can prove they actually make a living from the catch and sale of striped bass are going to get screwed if they make stripers a 100% game fish. What ever happened to buy out programs. My biggest problem with the commercial sector is right here in this state(MA),the commercial rod and reel season is a farce ,as it had been previously stated most holders of said licence are out recreational fishing and selling to subsidize for the cost of gas and pay for their boats. How many of these so called commercial R&R's are full time teachers already making a decent living just having fun during their 10 week vacation.(Teachers used only as an example not meant to single out this profession ,so any teachers out there don't jump down my throat:hihi: ).

PEC54
10-22-2007, 09:40 AM
With all due respect, it's not just baitchuckers who do this. There are plenty of artificial lure and (heaven forbid) flyfishers who keep more than they need and break the rules too.
Lets not forget that this states regs allow for the keeping of 2 28" striped bass per day. Anyone who does it is within their rights ,I'm not saying I agree with the regs ,all I'm saying is don't blame the person that only doing whats legally allowed. I've been fishing the cape cod canal alot for the past couple of years, there seems to be a pattern of who keeps their fish and who releases them, for the most part ,anglers who are fortunate to be able to get out alot and fish are usually the ones to catch and release, anglers who get out sparingly who get lucky and catch a keeper will bring it home. There are also guys out there that do keep everything just because they can just for bragging rights.:roll:

JimW
10-22-2007, 11:26 AM
Here's something to consider -
If you don't protect the habitat and the food source there's really no point.
By protecting one species you may get good short term results for sportsmen, but if the population thrives beyond what would be a natural balance in the prey/predation scheme it will naturally crash.
Good point on the poaching and black market - I've seen it in action - reported it and seen nothing come of it.

highway61
10-22-2007, 05:34 PM
It is my understanding, and please correct me if I am wrong, the commercial licensing fee is relatively low in Mass and other NE states. This low fee allows weekend warriors with large boats to offset fuel prices by selling their catch. I wonder if the states increased the fee enough so that it would not hurt the real commercial guys who depend on stripers for a living, but enough to chase away the weekend warrior boaters who take advantage of the system. There are no easy answers. Unless more is done on the enforcement side (I am not holding my breath) the problem of over harvesting will continue. On the recreationmal side, so much depends on raising the consciousness of recreational fishermen. Perhaps, the one good thing that might come from President Bush's support is that it will make more fishermen understand the importance of conserving a valuable resource for future generations of fishermen.