Tube fly hook wish [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: Tube fly hook wish


chromedome
04-11-2007, 11:07 PM
Up till recently, I was quite satisfied with my hook selection for the tubes I was tying. But then I wanted to get into tying shorter tubes tied on HMH micro tubes yet still stay with a #4 hook.
The closest I know of is Tiemco 105 at 5X short, and while it sorta works, the jury is still out (only tried it twice so far) on whether I will take fish on this setup. But this hook is of heavier guage than I'd like to see and I would prefer 6X short. Also its offset which could result in a critically off balance presentation. So my wish is that somewhere there exists a hook similar to the Tiemco 105 but of shorter shank, lighter wire, and not offset.
I might add that a #6 hook would be of much interest providing the size of the eye is about that of a Tiemco 105.

D3Smartie
04-13-2007, 12:29 PM
I have found the gamakatsu glo-bug hooks to be great for the tube flies i like to use.

juro
04-13-2007, 12:44 PM
Gami makes a number of good hook options, I also like the TMC and Nordics.

Google Tiemco and look for the profile chart.

kz308
04-13-2007, 11:22 PM
This may seem like a stupid question but whats a tube fly and what do you use them for?

chromedome
04-14-2007, 01:56 AM
This may seem like a stupid question but whats a tube fly and what do you use them for?
I'm probably not that well qualified to answer that question but it usually starts with a very thin tube. My use is with plastic lined metal tubes of just plastic. It contains no hook. I attach the tube to a special adaptor that can then be attached to a standard vise. After the fly is tied on the tube, a short piece of flex tubing is attached to the back end into which the hook will eventually be inserted to be firmly seated therein. Next, you thread your tippet down thru the tube and tie the hook on. The hook is inserted up into the flex tube and you're ready to fish.
A big advantage of tubes is that you can use a large heavy fly and a small hook which readily detaches from the flex tube when a fish takes. This way you don't have the leverage effect that would cause the hook to dislodge if you had used the standard long shank hook. Also, having the fly detached from the hook during the fight leads to less damage to the fly. THere's a lot more but if you simply go to google.com and type in "tube fly" +fishing, you will be opened up to the wonderful world of tube flies.

pescaphile
04-14-2007, 11:52 PM
If you're looking for short, try a standard salmonid bait hook like the gear guys use for fishing with single eggs. You can get 'em down to at least a size 12. You ought to have a good choice of finishes too, chrome, gold, red, black, bronze, . . . , etc.

chromedome
04-15-2007, 01:42 AM
If you're looking for short, try a standard salmonid bait hook like the gear guys use for fishing with single eggs. You can get 'em down to at least a size 12. You ought to have a good choice of finishes too, chrome, gold, red, black, bronze, . . . , etc.

I'm sure I've missed some possibilities in my search but the most promising I see right now is a single egg hook by Gamakatsu. I'll give that a try.

chromedome
04-15-2007, 01:43 AM
Thanks guys for all your suggestions. They were quite helpful.

Salar 33
04-15-2007, 05:31 AM
Dear Jz,

Tube flies are fly patterns tied on different length tubes made of an assortment of different materials that are use for weight from lighter than a hook to very heavy. They can be short and made from heavy brass or long and made from plastic. The weighted versions are used in Europe and Scandinavia as weighted flies are not permitted in North America.

My primary use of tubes is for early season bright salmon when the fish are looking for big flies with their bait eating instinct still in tact. Something like they just entered the river that day.

Long flies like streamers tied on a Carrie Stevens hooks have a distinct disadvantage because of the leverage created between the point of the hook and the eye of the hook when playing the fish. A big fish could have the hook in the corner of the jaw and the line pressure can bend the shank of the hook right over the snout. Also on a fish you want to release a large gap long hook can be hard on their mouth.

Tube flies have your leader run into the front of the tube and connected to the separate hook at the back. You keep the hook in place with short pieces of clear or colored flexible tubing. When a fish takes, the hook detaches itself from the main body of the tube fly. No leverage to pull out the hook. It's kind of like those fishing for Marlin videos where the lure is swing in the air on your leader and the fish is still hooked. The attached fly is 4 inches long with a #4 Loop double.

Dear Chrome,

Gamakatsu glo bug for singles and Loop tube fly for doubles.

C.R.O.

chromedome
05-05-2007, 08:21 PM
[QUOTE=Salar 33

Dear Chrome,

Gamakatsu glo bug for singles and Loop tube fly for doubles.

C.R.O.[/QUOTE]

Thanks for the suggestion. Tried to find the specs on the Gammy hook but can't see if these are straight shank/not offset -- and yes I've favorably used the loop doubles for tubes on salmon.

So far I've had to resort to Mustad and 9471 does work tho its more stout than I want. I've ordered M 94151 which should be significantly lighter with other properties hopefully in line. But with very slow delivery from J&M Hunting supply, I have yet to get them.