Attractor flies [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: Attractor flies


Colorado Cajun
02-15-2007, 11:44 AM
What is your favorite attractor fly for Rainbow's and Brown's?

Mine is the Royal Trude. It seems like anytime there is some action on top the water and I'm not having success, it is my go to fly to entice a strike.

Mitch

John Desjardins
02-15-2007, 11:50 AM
Wooly bugger

teflon_jones
02-15-2007, 12:51 PM
Royal Trude is a big favorite of mine too, but a beadhead black sparkle bugger takes the cake. Technically that's not an attractor though.

millerbrown
02-15-2007, 04:18 PM
Ok, I'll bite. Why isn't a black beadhead sparkle bugger an attractor fly? Although someone can say that the members of the bugger family may represent something that may represent trout food it's the action and sparkle of the fly that makes it interesting to trout. We're not matching any hatch here, just fishing something that grabs their attention. If you want attention then try a Moby Dick. This outlandish creation is great for browns and rainbows.

Millerbrown

FishHawk
02-16-2007, 05:29 AM
Yellow Marabou Muddler, Mickey Finn, Lighting bug and Royal Wullf..
FishHawk

titleguy
02-16-2007, 07:02 AM
Orange Crystal Stimulator- Once the brookies hit your strike indicator, time to switch.:hihi:

shotgunner
02-16-2007, 07:02 AM
On typical summer mid-days a sz 16-18 Renegade. Two color hackle helps W/ my poor vision, & the fish seem to like it as well. Yellow humpy a close second.

SG

teflon_jones
02-16-2007, 07:46 AM
Ok, I'll bite. Why isn't a black beadhead sparkle bugger an attractor fly? Although someone can say that the members of the bugger family may represent something that may represent trout food it's the action and sparkle of the fly that makes it interesting to trout. We're not matching any hatch here, just fishing something that grabs their attention. If you want attention then try a Moby Dick. This outlandish creation is great for browns and rainbows.

Millerbrown
This is really a gray area and I would say however you classify it is fine. Personally, this is why I say it's not an attractor.

1. A woolly bugger is supposed to resemble everything. A stimulator/attractor is really supposed to resemble nothing in terms of color, though the shape may mimic something in nature. There's a gray area here because you could argue that if it's supposed to resemble everything, then it's an attractor. But what if you tie the bugger in bright yellow? Does the bright color make it an attractor? Yes, I think so, but we're talking about black sparkle buggers, so on to my next point.

2. If you fish it like a streamer, it resembles a baitfish. There's a gray area here because what minnow really looks like a sparkly black piece of chenille and feathers? Personally, I think it does resemble a baitfish enough that it's not an attractor. What about streamer flies tied in all yellow? Are those attractors, or streamers? Or attractor-streamers?

3. If you fish it like a nymph, many nymph patterns have some sparkle to them. Honestly, I don't know whether they have some sparkle in nature or whether the sparkle is added just to attract fish more. I know some nymphs get air bubbles attached to them to help them hatch and I always figured that's what the sparkle was supposed to mimic. But this gets really gray because exactly how much sparkle do you put on before it turns from a nymph to an attractor? Personally, a favorite trout fly of mine is a very small bugger tied with peacock herl for the body and a couple of pieces of sparkle fiber in the tail. I might also add a flashback on it too. So is this a nymph or an attractor? Is it a nymph without the flashback, and an attractor if it has it? There's a big gray area here.

Personally, I'm sticking with my definition that a woolly bugger isn't an attractor because it's supposed to resemble everything. But I think based on color and how much sparkle it has, it could go either way. I'll call those bugger-attractors. :)

millerbrown
02-16-2007, 11:15 AM
Whoa.........I think we're splitting guard hairs here. Here's my general rule. If I don't know what it represents and it has a color scheme not found in the environment that I'm using it in then it's an attractor. Most everything else is an imitation.

Millerbrown

Dble Haul
02-16-2007, 11:48 AM
A fly that can resemble many things at once is generally considered an attractor pattern.

Colorado Cajun
02-16-2007, 11:52 AM
Wow, some interesting flies mentioned. When lake fishing, my favorite fly is a cone head crystal olive wooly bugger.

Titleguy, Isn't it a blast when that happens? You don't expext for a fish to hit your indicator and all of a sudden, there it is. On the Arkansas River in the summer I use a 2 fly rig with a stimulator as the upper fly.

titleguy
02-16-2007, 04:10 PM
On the three salmon/brookie rivers I fish, that is my go-to rig from mid June to mid-September. Really fun when you get a 14" salmon and a 10" brookie with differing agendas.:chuckle: