Schoolies, one hand, and reel capacity [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: Schoolies, one hand, and reel capacity


peter-s-c
06-16-2006, 02:17 PM
Even on my first trip in '99 I've used two-handers for my striper fishing, my single hander experience has been limited to two days in Pleasant Bay. This past trip, we spent a lot of time on inside waters where the odds of hitting a keepah aren't very high. Swinging a two-hander for these fish seems a bit much.

Like to put together an 8 wt. kit for next year for these waters and the choice is to use an existing reel or buy a bigger capacity one. I'd like to hear from the single hander guys as to what capacity they prefer for these situations where larger fish are not much of a possiblity. Right now, my existing reel will hold about 150 yds. of 30# of Dacron plus about 100' of running line and a 28' head. I have had a fish run more than 150 yards of backing on me when using my 11/12 Atlantis, but that was on Morris Island and not on some little neck in a back bay. I know I can toss on some Gelspun but I'm not keen on that solution.

I guess what I'm asking is -- would you be comfortable with a 150 yds of Dacron on an 8 wt. fishing a little bay?

Peter

striperstripper
06-16-2006, 04:18 PM
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

peter-s-c
06-16-2006, 07:04 PM
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Jeez man, stop beating about the bush, eh! Tell me what you really think! :)

I guess I'm just being a bit of a worry-wart as I have had the experience of a big fish ripping off a lot of line. Be my luck that one hits when I've got the little rig out.

shadfreak
06-16-2006, 07:14 PM
We should all be that lucky.
Larry

sean
06-16-2006, 07:23 PM
Plus if you did get spooled the ones that got away stories are always more memorable...in a self depricating kind of way :)

150 should be more than plenty. With the line included you are at 180 yards out, the chances are very high you would loose the fish anyway. That is a long ways...all my single hand reels have 200 - 250 yards on them.

-sean

striperstripper
06-16-2006, 07:33 PM
I've caught some of my biggest fish on 8 and 9 wt rods,30 lb plus,using 10 wt tiogas with 150 -175 yds of 30 lb rated dacron and never once come close to being spooled.With 25 -30 lb rated flyline strength and 20 -30 lb leaders you should be able to put the screws to a running fish long before that concern should enter the excitment.I generally set my drag in the 6 lb-8 lb range,and palm the reel if more is needed.Stripers are normally one big run affairs,after the intial burst don't let them get their head and they'll come right in.Most stripers are lost close to shore just when you think you've got em licked ,once their close forget about reeling ,walk backwards and drag them ashore ,if there's surf ride em in on a wave.

FrankF
06-16-2006, 08:21 PM
I probably agree with you about Pleasant Bay having mostly smaller fish...so an eight weight is fine. On the other hand I have paddled it in my kayak many times and have spotted some very large fish but never caught one. One time in the fog a spooked one maybe seven to ten feet from my kayak in a flat along side deep water. It went into the deep in no time. So this year I bought a two hander to try and catch one in the deep water and in the surf. I am hoping that if a can chuck a bigger fly into the southwest wind and let it sink into a hole and count to 30 ; I can cover a lot more water and I may have a shot at one. I'll see what happens. What the heck...it's better than a stick in the eye. I am always trying something different.

PS I love to paddle in Pleasant Bay; i feel like it is a privilege to be able to do it.

peter-s-c
06-16-2006, 09:01 PM
I've caught some of my biggest fish on 8 and 9 wt rods,30 lb plus,using 10 wt tiogas with 150 -175 yds of 30 lb rated dacron and never once come close to being spooled.With 25 -30 lb rated flyline strength and 20 -30 lb leaders you should be able to put the screws to a running fish long before that concern should enter the excitment.I generally set my drag in the 6 lb-8 lb range,and palm the reel if more is needed.Stripers are normally one big run affairs,after the intial burst don't let them get their head and they'll come right in.Most stripers are lost close to shore just when you think you've got em licked ,once their close forget about reeling ,walk backwards and drag them ashore ,if there's surf ride em in on a wave.

Ya, my son landed his 38 incher last year on Nauset beach using a rather soft 10 wt. that's really a 9 wt. and a freshwater reel with a dubious drag having probably less than 100 yds. of 30# on it. He liked the reel and didn't want to switch to a bigger one. He was lucky that the seals had set-up a line like a corps of linebackers and the fish turned back into shore before it reached them. Then it was just a matter of doing exactly as you described to get it in.

In my case, the fish ran along the shoreline instead of going for open water. It ran behind my fishing buddies and I was paranoid that it would turn out and wrap them up. With my backing running out, I put the brakes on and it opened up the 2/0 hook when it came to a halt. Bye-bye.

So I suppose it can cut both ways . . .

Greg Pavlov
06-17-2006, 01:58 PM
I would go with a 9 or 10 wt. If nothing else, you'll be able to cast
better if conditions worsen.

peter-s-c
06-17-2006, 04:38 PM
I would go with a 9 or 10 wt. If nothing else, you'll be able to cast
better if conditions worsen.

Know what you mean and I do have the 10 wt. but I watched that older guy at the golf course whack fish after fish short casting a lighter rig -- made me think.