Atlantic Salmon Fly of the week Buck Bug [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: Atlantic Salmon Fly of the week Buck Bug


Charlie
05-11-2006, 02:05 PM
No one seems to be sure who originated this fly but it is commonly known that it was developed on the Miramichi in the 70s. And since that time it has become one of the hottest salmon flies ever developed.
When tying this fly trim the deer hair to a very slim shape. Keep in mind that this is "not" meant to be a dry fly. There are many other color combinations for this fly to numerous to mention. Just use your imagination.

Tag: Fine oval gold tinsel followed by orange floss.
Body: Spun deer body hair trimmed to a slim cigar shape.
Hackle: orange saddle hackle wound through the body
Head: Black

Patagonian
05-11-2006, 02:17 PM
Hi Charlie,
Very nice fly. It seems very much to "Green Machine", usually used in Rio Grande, Tierra del Fuego.

See you,
Patagonian

D3Smartie
05-11-2006, 04:32 PM
the green machine is a very good fly on the Restigouche... really seems to catch a lot of smaller fish, grilse and salmon under 15, but has also got some bigger fish. My brother got a 32 pounder on it a few years back.

flytyer
05-12-2006, 01:22 AM
Charlie,

Buck Bugs are a very overlooked fly type for steelhead during the low-water time of late July to mid-September when tied small (#8-#12). I've been amazed at the paucity of them in use of rivers of the PNW. And as you pointed out, bugs aren't necessarily meant to float or skate, they often get a steelhead's attention after they are pulled under and fished as a shallow sunk fly.

Smolt
05-12-2006, 09:11 AM
To be sure the Buc Bug sinks just under the surface, when tying the Buc Bug, I do not pack the deerhair as tightly as I do on a dry deerhair fly, like the Bomber, for example. In fact, for the last seven or eight years, I tie my "Bugs" using micro-chenile rather than deerhair. Its faster, trimmer, and will sink deeper, if you want it to.

chromedome
05-15-2006, 02:24 AM
To be sure the Buc Bug sinks just under the surface, when tying the Buc Bug, I do not pack the deerhair as tightly as I do on a dry deerhair fly, like the Bomber, for example. In fact, for the last seven or eight years, I tie my "Bugs" using micro-chenile rather than deerhair. Its faster, trimmer, and will sink deeper, if you want it to.
Good idea it would seem. But I've asked why not tie green machines this way. I got an answer, which I forget, that indicated that deer hair was the way to go. Charlie, could you please comment on that?

Charlie
05-15-2006, 08:48 AM
Bill,

You are correct. The idea of using the deer hair is to get the fly as close to neutral buoyancy as possible. As flytyer said, you want them under but running shallow. With that said the type of fly Smolt talks about, using the micro-chenile to make the fly sink faster also has its uses. I think it depends on the situation.

Thanks, Charlie.

Smolt
05-15-2006, 10:31 AM
I got the idea to use micro-chenile when one of the guides in NB I have known for many years gave me and my fishing companion each a Green Machine tied with dubbing rather than deerhair. We hooked two grilse almost simultaneously.

While I am very good at spinning deerhair, I have never been much good at dubbing, so I switched to micro-chenile. The guide now uses micro-chenile as well.

The hackle keeps the mico-chenile-tied bug up in the water collumn. If you want it to go deeper, you trim the hackle.

I still use deerhair-tied Buc Bugs, but not very often.

CK