What should I bring? [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: What should I bring?


OC
04-12-2006, 11:23 AM
As some of you know myself, my wife and son will be leaving for a 4 or 5 year world cruise one year from now. Our boat is almost ready except for the up grading of electronics and maybe a new main sail. It's been lot's of hard work and thinking about fishing has far in the back of my mind. Suddenly I can start to think about the equipment I want to bring and would like to start collecting what is needed now instead of 3 weeks before we leave.

I think I'm ok for rods and reels and tying equipment. 12wt billy Pate older style, run of the mill 12 wt sage rod, 10wt reel and rod, two, 8 wt rods and reels, reels not really salt. a couple of 6 wt rods and no salt reels for them. I'm sure I need to stock up on leader material, should I bring extra lines and backing? I will need the very best in reef walkers ones that will give true protection even up the sides. No need to get blood poison from corral or sea urchin thorns in the middle of nowhere. Any sugestions on that.

What else should we be looking into so that we can fish happy for those 4 or 5 years.
Thanks
OC

FredA
04-12-2006, 11:46 AM
This will take some thought.

Re. electronics... don't forget you need the means (satilite dish, or whatever) to post your reports and pics.

jfbasser
04-12-2006, 11:50 AM
I had the same thought...you will need internet access from the boat...so I presume Inmarsat or Globalstar for the electronics suite....Re flylines...I would bring some spares and keep them relatively cool...4 years is a long time...good luck

teflon_jones
04-12-2006, 12:12 PM
You definitely need to pick up at least one saltwater reel for the 6 and 8 weights, and you should probably plan on having a backup too.

A collection of tying materials will keep you stocked on whatever flies you need for that portion of the world.

Smcdermott
04-12-2006, 12:28 PM
OC,

I would have to agree with Teflon in that those 8wts will be your main bone rods and should have a quality SW reel (or two). I have only been fly fishing for 5 years and in that time even my best (Abel and Tibor) reels have needed to go back for servicing. I also agree with JF in that you should have spare lines. In addition you should make up a repair kit for your gear. Needles for nail knots, some braided tubing for emergency fly line repair should it get severed on coral etc...

On a side note, I think we should have a winter fly drive for you. We all tie up some of our favorite tropics patterns and in exchange you agree to give us a report from time to time on where and when you used them. Deal or no deal?

Sean

Henry
04-12-2006, 12:59 PM
To date, in my last 4 trips south to tropical locations...the most valuable item I've brought on vacation has been a quality first-aid kit. Minor cuts or scrapes can and do quickly turn septic in southern climes ( a problem all of us don't need).

An essential addition to that first-aid kit is a roll or two of clear Duct Tape (a new product). It's as durable and sticky as the traditional duct tape that we're all used to...just not as obvious. Using the tape as a waterproof top dressing over bandages, gauzes or even directly over minor blisters etc. works wonders.

This past trip to Eleuthera Bahama's, I got a large blister on my left heel because I didn't tend to a small piece of coral that got into my flats wading boot. Upon noticing the irritation, I immediately treated it with anticeptic...dressed it...then liberally covered the works with the duct tape and for the first time in my life...I actually had a wound "heal" even after constantly getting wet with days of walking the flats. Without that tape...I'd have likely had to stop wading the 2nd week of my holiday or risk severe septic infection.

Best regards,

Henry

OC
04-12-2006, 02:15 PM
Fred and Sean, I can't afford internet aboard but will have ssb aboard capable of sending and recieving e-mails. Internet will be the many internet cafe's around the world. Talked with juro about doing a thing from far distant atolls already. Sean the fly drive wow that would be fun. I can see it now somewhere in the Tuamotus Atolls or the Austral Islands or how about Tokelau and I'm walking some flat no one has ever fly fished before. I spot 500 bones moving to my left I pull out my fly box and pick out a fly tied by one of our members. I say to my wife who will be my spotter this fly was tied by Striblue or by fred A or so and so. One cast a nice 8 lb bone to hand and you know what? I would name that flat after the person who tied the fly. I would leave one small sign on the beach proclaiming that this flat is now officially named after, example striblue for his creative crab fly.:chuckle: I would have a ball doing that.

Henry, the clear duct tape is a great idea I can use it for many things besides cuts. My son will be 14 by then and he has a habit of talking way too much at times, good kid but on a small 44 foot boat that tape will be golden. The first aid kit will be the best, my wife is a doctor and will be giving talks soon on cruising first aid supplies, I'll tell her about the tape.

Ya, about more sw reels, I better start putting away a little extra cash for such items. I'm thinking cheaper than the top of the line as much as I hate to do that but they will take a beating and maybe it is better to get two at the price of one. What about that idea? When we get to NZ in a couple of years I will be able to stockup again.
Thanks for the tips keep them going!

formula1
04-12-2006, 05:19 PM
For first aid, which seems to be a big part of this discussion, I'd recommend some type of cyanoacrylate glue (Crazy Glue). If you do research, you'll find it was originally developed to seal wounds for wartime use. You might think it would sting but it does not, and it's way better than the Nu-skin type products on the market today IME (I was leary at first but I carry it everywhere now - it's great for minor cuts and actually helps them heal faster). I like it because it does a great job of sealing cuts against the elements in southern climes - I know windsurfers who use it on their hands when they get blisters and cuts from handling their surf rigs and it allows them to continue surfing.

Eddie
04-12-2006, 07:22 PM
I have to assume that 1st aid (wilderness medicine training) is among your primary concerns so let's talk fishing.
I would put together a fly tying kit (Juro posted a good starting point for bones. Bigger feathers and hooks and more colors and and heavier eyes you should be set). This would be a major item on the boat.
Definitely bring extra lines and a splicing kit. Those atolls have coral heads that will take their toll.
Find a pair of reef shoes that fit well. You will probably wear them out quickly (I hope!) and wind up with a pair of chinese aqua sox knock offs. Maybe buy a couple of pairs.
Randall Kaughman's bone fish book is a good resource.
I would try to figure out how to fish on Palmira.
Get a heavy trolling outfit. A big Penn senator and a short stout rod. Very heavy mono and and some skirts and some jigs, wire leaders, maybe some rappalas ect. and wasabi...Mmmmm....wasabi. This would be the most important fishing outfit on the boat.
I would consider a heavy surf out fit too. There will be so many reefs with big jacks and it would be fun to launch a big plug way out there and get 'em.
Extra polarized specs and some fit overs if you wear RX.
What an adventure!

jlsmithii
04-12-2006, 09:01 PM
For first aid, which seems to be a big part of this discussion, I'd recommend some type of cyanoacrylate glue (Crazy Glue).
I'd reconsider the crazy glue as a first aid product. First, it is cyanide based. Second, it works via an exothermic reaction (heat generating). Both of these are negative factors for wound healing and actually may cause more tissue injury. True Dermabond is a crazy glue derivative but it was designed for small, repeat small, clean wounds. (and it is far inferior to steri-strips or suturing for that matter). Where there is tension on the skin edges, the wound will not heal well. Crazy glue is not a good choice for tension reduction, especially over skin areas that move. Likewise if it is a deep wound, especially if it is a dirty wound, crazy glue is a very poor decision. If a wound infection occurs, the entire wound will have to be reopened to allow for drainage. Sections of steri-strips or sutures can be removed and only the infected portion of the wound is then opened. In a location where antibiotics and prompt medical care may not be readily available, prudence needs to be exercised when dealing with these wounds.
Just my humble opinion. (I've seen too many wounds with serious complications that would have been very easily dealt with if treated properly the first time.)

OC
04-12-2006, 09:14 PM
Hey Eddie, thanks for the tips but no Penn Senator. Trolling will be done for food that means a couple of 200 lb test hand lines tied to the stern cleat a big loop hanging off the stern and a heavy surgical cord as a shock. Did this trip when I was twenty, anyway a lot of it. Some of my most vivid memories even to this day was seeing that surgical tube strech out when a big Mahi or a 100 pound Yellowfin took the skirt. Let him play out for awhile, put on the leather gloves and haul that fish's sorry arse in. UMnnn Sushi fresh, Sushi Breakfast, lunch and sushi pie for dinner. We now even have a freezer/ refrige on board so I think we will make homemade Sushi Ice cream for dessert. Your right on the reef walkers, I think I will just buy about 4 pair of the chinese Aqua soxs, the ones with the hard plastic lowers that rapp around the feet up to the lower ankle. Always get new ones throughout the world.

I Have never bought a cheap reel before always saved my dimes and pennies for the best. Can anyone tell me some cheaper SW reels that are simple drag systems and really easy to maintaine?
Crazy Glue to the list. I have read about it being used that way.
Thanks

formula1
04-12-2006, 09:56 PM
I'd reconsider the crazy glue as a first aid product. First, it is cyanide based. Second, it works via an exothermic reaction (heat generating). Both of these are negative factors for wound healing and actually may cause more tissue injury. True Dermabond is a crazy glue derivative but it was designed for small, repeat small, clean wounds. (and it is far inferior to steri-strips or suturing for that matter). Where there is tension on the skin edges, the wound will not heal well. Crazy glue is not a good choice for tension reduction, especially over skin areas that move. Likewise if it is a deep wound, especially if it is a dirty wound, crazy glue is a very poor decision. If a wound infection occurs, the entire wound will have to be reopened to allow for drainage. Sections of steri-strips or sutures can be removed and only the infected portion of the wound is then opened. In a location where antibiotics and prompt medical care may not be readily available, prudence needs to be exercised when dealing with these wounds.
Just my humble opinion. (I've seen too many wounds with serious complications that would have been very easily dealt with if treated properly the first time.)

Dont' want to get into a long debate but Crazy type glues were specifically developed for use as first aid in wartime situations where sutures were not available or too cumbersome to be deployed and is still used for some surgical situations (including suturing soft tissue such as liver). It may be cyanide based but that does not mean it's poisonous - I've used it and for many of the cuts I've gotten it's worked better than Nu-skin and bandages by far IME. Otherwise we could say saltwater has salt in it, which is chlorine based which is a toxic chemical - better not get into saltwater or it could be fatal <grin>. Many substances we use are based on poisons but when combined with the other chemicals they are rendered harmless. As far as exothermic, I don't think so - never felt any heat at all - are you mixing it up with epoxy glues? I can tell you, in winter I suffer from dry skin splits all the time - they took forever to heal until I was told about Crazy Glue - now they heal in 2-3 days, not 2- 3 weeks. Crazy Glue definitely helped the healing proces with those skin splits. Do some research, use google and you will see what I mean.

PS Of course I am not advocating just sealing a wound shut - cleaning and a proper disinfectant/antibiotic should be used. But there are some nasty microorganisms in saltwater and if you suffer a cut, a bandaid or suture is not going to seal it up against thes microorganisms. Crazy Glue will seal it so you can go on about your business of being in the water if necessary.

Adrian
04-13-2006, 05:16 AM
This sounds like an incredible adventure.

Budgeting for reels, I would buy the best for the size I expect to use most and go with Sci Angler system 2 for the low budget sizes. They are almost indestructible and very easy to maintain. The drags are cheap caliper systems (i.e. crap) but give you enough to prevent a spool overrun if you keep them clean - mine have dropped into freespool a couple of times - and the large exposed rims can be 'palmed'.

Interesting debate on the cyanocrylate. I have used it also in a cuple of 'pinch' situations and it worked very well. It actually has anti-microbial properties and as formula1 said, there is no free cyanide floating around. Infection in tropical seas is almost guaranteed on even the slightest graze so plenty of antibiotic ointments and tabs sounds like a good thing to have.

juro
04-13-2006, 05:46 AM
The "name a flat" proposal blows the name a star thing right out of the galaxy!! I love it Sean, I will definitely send some flies to OC for this :D

Duct tape and aquaseal! But not for cuts :)

OC
04-13-2006, 08:58 AM
Juro,

Do you remember stories from WW2 about some guy who used to put up signs,"Conroy was here." I could do the same, find a peice of drift wood write the name of fly giver, pen name only and fly. Ten years or so later as French guides start flying to these distant places they are going to find these signs and it will drive them crazy.:devil:

For the crazy glue thing, my wife used to be a doctor in the ER and said they would use something like crazy glue. They all called it crazy glue but not the exact same. She said if done properly in an emergency it would do the trick.
Back in the late 70's I took some advanced search and rescue course for ski patrol at Bridger Bowl. Some of the doctors and wilderness EMT's teaching the courses had some really crazy ideas on saving a life in a bad situation. Can't remember much of it anymore but do remember that they told us always carry a condom incase we came across certain types of chest injuries. I'll let everyones imagination run wild on that one.

SteelBoneguy
04-13-2006, 11:23 AM
Look into some Lamson and Ross reels. I'm an Abel guy but Abel are not known for low cost. With your wife being a doc. she could get some surigcal glue. Crazy glue can work in a pinch but there is similar products designed better for the body.

FishHawk
04-13-2006, 05:03 PM
Tioga is another cheap reel that you should look into . A lot of people like them. also bring along a set of small screw drivers in case you have to take your reel apart for maintenance. FishHawk

jlsmithii
04-13-2006, 05:56 PM
perhaps my first reply was worded a little strong. but i still would not recommend crazy glue.

as for the medical history:
In 1959, a variety of cyanoacrylate adhesives were developed. These glues polymerize on contact with basic substances such as water or blood to form a strong bond. The first glue developed was methyl cyanoacrylate, which was studied extensively for its potential medical applications and was rejected due to its potential tissue toxicity such as inflammation or local foreign body reactions. crazy glue is chemically within this class of cyanoacrylates. Although not labeled as such, over-the-counter Super Glue products contain methyl alcohol, because it is inexpensive to produce. Cyanoacrylates cure by a chemical reaction called polymerization, which produces heat. Methyl alcohol has a pronounced heating action when it contacts tissue and may even produce burns if the glue contacts a large enough area of tissue. Rapid curing may also lead to tissue necrosis (ie,death). You may have not noted such reactions because minimal amounts are being used. Nevertheless, with a greater toxic potential, over-the-counter products are inappropriate for use in wound closure.
Quinn, J., & Kissack, J., "Tissue Adhesives for Laceration Repair During Sporting Events," Clinical J. of Sports Med., Vol. 4 No. 4, 1994, p. 245.

Further research revealed that by changing the type of alcohol in the compound to one with a longer molecular chain, the tissue toxicity was much reduced. All the medical grade tissue cyanoacrylate adhesives currently available for human use contain butyl-esters, which are costlier to produce (ie Dermabond)
the mechanism of action for this is:
Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives combine cyanoacetate and formaldehyde in a heat vacuum along with a base to form a liquid monomer. When the monomer comes into contact with moisture on the skin's surface, it chemically changes into a polymer that binds to the top epithelial layer. This polymer forms a cyanoacrylate bridge, binding the two wound edges together. Heat is often generated (ie exothermic) during the change from monomer to polymer, and this heat may be felt on occasion by patients during application to the skin. - see dermabond packaging insert. furthermore, dermabond (the medical crazy glue) is only recommended for small superficial clean cuts. it does not work well on deep, stellate, or contaminated wounds.

don't get me wrong, there is an application for everything. I have dermabond in my first aid kit for those few situations where it is applicable. I also use other "tissue friendly" glue in my line of work on a regular basis (Tisseal a fibrin based glue and Duraseal a polyethylene glycol) However, suturing and/or steri-strips still is a better treatment method. A properly cleaned and closed wound will re-epithealize (assuming no underlying comorbidities such as peripheral vascular disease or diabetes) within 24-48 hrs. After which it is ok to get it wet and continue on with your life. Per the package insert on dermabond, the wound is to be kept dry for 5 days for optimal results.

You mentioned your wife was an emergency room physician - I assume that means she knows how to suture. My advice to you would be to have her assemble a suture kit (and yes include some dermabond for those appropriate situations, but not crazy glue). Everything you need to close many wounds can easily be contained in something as small as a fanny pack.

just my opinion

OC
04-13-2006, 10:31 PM
Thanks Jlsmityhii, I can't wait for my wife to stich me up when the time comes and it will.:hihi:

And guys thanks for the tips on the reels I'm going to start looking into the ones mentioned and see if some of our sponsors have them.

Anyone have something unusual to bring on the trip something that I will really enjoy walking flats with that will be much apreciated so far away.

SteelBoneguy
04-14-2006, 09:21 AM
I for sure would get some ex offico flat shirts and long nylon pants. Walking some of the flats that have turtle grass can kill your lower legs as the tiny coral on the grass cuts right into your legs and burns like a son of a b...

Also remember if you get stung by a stingray to apply heat to the wound. Heat neutralizes the posion doesn't do anything for the stinger though..

Jelly Fish just looked it up. General Jellyfish Stings Treatment:

-rinse the area with sea water. Do not scrub or wash with fresh water which will aggravate the stinging cells. Do not pour sun lotion or spirit-based liquid on the area.
-deactivate remaining cells with a vinegar rinse. If no vinegar is available use urine, apart from Box jellies and Irukandji. Ask a mate for a golden shower! Really! Preferably male urine as it's considered to be more sterile.
-lift off any remaining tentacles with a stick or similar.
-If cells still linger, dust with flour and carefully scrape off with a blunt knife.
- after all tentacle sections have gone, pain can be treated with a cold pack and/or a local anaesthetic such as a sunburn lotion or insect bite treatment that lists '...ocaine' as an ingredient.
-if there is continued swelling, or itchiness, apply a light steroid cream e.g. Hydrocortisone eczema cream.
-if muscle spasms persist see a doctor

juro
04-14-2006, 09:23 AM
Musical instruments.

Not sure if you already play, but a few sweet chords with the equatorial moon shimmering on the water near the timbuktu atoll would sure make that Patron go down smoothly.

And lots of limes :)

OC
04-14-2006, 12:15 PM
The wife and I have talked about the nylon pants. Flats not included we will wear shorts only in morning and evening and long sleeves and those light flats type of pants in High sun hours. Both of us love the sun but have had too much of it over the years. We have a dodger/bimini setup over the cockpit which helps but even with that the reflection day after day of the ocean will get you. We also have a sun cloth that fits over most of the boat at anchor. You can walk under it and it keeps the decks/cabin cool. As long as it does not blow over 15 knots that sun cloth is one of our most important items we have on board.

Juro, My wife plays the mbira. It is an insturment from Zimbabwe, she lived there for a few years back in the 80's as a midwife and picked it up. We will take a couple mbiras on board and I plan on learning from her how to play it. The mbira is an instrument to bring back the dead with, so I guess we plan on having lots of company from old friends and family.

I'm familiar with the pee wash having lived in Hawaii and surfed every day. Didn't know about only male pee though, my girl friend back then thought I was just kinky.

mugsy
04-14-2006, 11:26 PM
Regarding reels, I would not recommend a Ross. I have a Ross salt water reel and a couple of Nautilus (Old Florida). The Nautilus beats the Ross hands down. It doesn't seem to matter how much I soak and rinse the Ross, the reel and the drag gets sticky and I wind up sending it back for service after practically every trip. Their service is great, but that won't do you any good on the trip. I have never had an ounce of trouble with the Nautilus, and I love their drag. Another plus is they are a sponsor of this site (oldfloridareels.com). While the Old Florida models (I have a couple of those too) work well - better than the Ross - and are cheaper than their Nautilus model, I think the Nautilus is worth the extra bucks. I think they used to have a program where they provide a "loaner" if you commit to a story of your travels that they can use. Your trip might be perfect for that deal if they still do it!

How about a 'boga grip' and an extra long set of forceps? I would also recommend a few tubes of zinc oxide. Good for the 1st aid kit, and use can use it as a "white-out" sun screen when really needed. A small collapsible crab trap?

nmbrowncom
04-16-2006, 02:21 PM
OC, CONSIDER SCI ANGLER SYSTEM 2 REELS. I HAVE A NUMBER OF THEM WHICH I'VE HAD FOR YEARS. THEY WERE MY PRIMARY REELS UNTIL LAST YEAR WHEN I GOT OLD FLORIDA/NAUTILUS REELS. I STILL USE THE SCI ANGLER FOR STRIPERS IN THE BOSTON HARBOR AREA AND IN THAT QUARRY THEY CONTINUE TO BE MY PRIMARY REELS.. I HAVE YET TO HAVE ANY PROBLEM WITH ANY OF THEM. THEY ARE RELATIVELY INEXPENSIVE,INCREDIBLY DURABLE, AND VERY RELIABLE,AND THEY TAKE A BEATING. I'VE SEEN NEW ONE'S ON EBAY AT GREAT PRICES. FOR REALLY CHEAP REELS OKUMA'S ARE PRETTY GOOD FOR THE MONEY, BUT I'D BRING A NUMBER OF BACKUPS. THE OLD FLORIDA/NAUTILUS REELS ARE AMONG THE BEST IN MY VIEW. BUT, WHILE NOT AS EXPENSIVE AS THE OTHER HIGHEST END REELS SUCH AS THE ABLES, TIBORS AND PATES,AND JUST AS GOOD OR BETTER, THEY ARE NOT CHEAP. THE SALT WATER GUIDES IN FLORIDA BOW TO THE ALTER OF NAUTILUS, AND LET'S FACE IT, FLORIDA IS PROBABLY THE PREMIER SALT WATER FISHERY ON THE PLANET. I'D LOVE TO TIE UP SOME FLAT WINGS FOR YOU IF YOU'D LIKE.

flyinsalt
04-22-2006, 02:17 PM
I agree with the Old Florida reels, I have three of them and have never had a bit of trouble with them. They're half the price of the Tibors and you can get an even better deal on e-bay. Just watch it over the next few months because they don't come up too often.
I would also get a good pair of fishing pliers, like Abel. They will last forever and have a hundred uses. What a great adventure!

formula1
04-22-2006, 09:08 PM
I'd go with another brand besides Abel - I've heard from way too many people that the cutting edges on them don't meet evenly and as a result have difficulty snipping braid...one guy said she sent it back several times to Abel and each time it was "fixed" it was the same, eventually he was told "that's just how they're made." The Ross pliers actually look pretty nice but regardless I'd make sure of the return policy where you buy them, or try them first hand on snipping braid etc before buying.