Custom Cut Tips [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: Custom Cut Tips


SILVERSCALES
03-18-2006, 01:35 PM
Here is a question for any one that wants to participate. I recently obtained a tip that is 20' long and meant to be cut to custom lengths. It is a 11.5 ft/sec sink rate, and weighs in at a whopping 470 grains. I've been thinking about chopping it for a few favorite runs that it would be perfect for however, a little voice keeps telling me that I should leave it as is (I have a rod that can handle this much weight) and dredge some of the deep "unexplored" waters that a steelie might be in. What would you do? I am just looking for some thoughts and opinions. It is easy enough to get more of these tips, so that is not a factor. I just need to know if I would be crazy to fish the whole thing. Thanks very much.


Silver scales

chromer
03-18-2006, 08:38 PM
If you can throw it why not :)

Most tips are 15, not much diff there.

Are they tapered?

rico
03-19-2006, 03:48 AM
I would buy another 20 foot section and chop that one. Flexibility in controlling depth is key.

rico

t_richerzhagen
03-23-2006, 08:06 AM
is that at 23.5 grains per foot, there are not many, if any, floating bellies that are going to make that tip cast well. Generally you want the number of grains per foot to be about the same for the tip and the floating belly for nice casting.

So what setup are you casting it with?

At 470 grains it would make a full sinking head all by itself for a lot of rods.

SalmoGairdneri
03-23-2006, 05:22 PM
Here is a question for any one that wants to participate. I recently obtained a tip that is 20' long and meant to be cut to custom lengths. It is a 11.5 ft/sec sink rate, and weighs in at a whopping 470 grains.


Silver scales

Who makes that stuff? What is is called? That's crazy heavy.

In general you want to have your belly have grains/foot at least in the ballpark of the tip to really get it to roll over. Might be trick with that stuff.

Still I'm oddly intrigued.

-tony

t_richerzhagen
03-23-2006, 08:11 PM
The Custom Cut tips are AirFlo. And 470 grains for 20 feet is heavy.

GrantK
03-24-2006, 04:44 PM
And 470 grains for 20 feet is heavy.

It is heavy, but not even close to the heaviest thing people use to make custom tips. The "Hi-Brid" line that has been popular on the North Coast of Oregon for a couple decades now (originated supposedly by Michael Gorman who was formeraly associated with the Scarlet Ibis fly shop in Corvallis) utilizes chunks of 850 Deep Water Express. That stuff comes in at 33 grains per foot (flat sections outside of taper). There's all sorts of things for which those kinds of lines are very useful for those that tend to think outside the box.

Muckle Salmon
03-24-2006, 06:33 PM
Just my opinion but in the distant past I have found it useful to use a spinning rod to chuck lead weights. Sometimes outside the box just puts you inside another.

Ramsay

GrantK
03-24-2006, 06:46 PM
Just my opinion but in the distant past I have found it useful to use a spinning rod to chuck lead weights. Sometimes outside the box just puts you inside another.

Ramsay

Yep, and it's just my opinion too, but sometimes I find flippant comments that try to equate some forms of fly angling with gear fishing are more reflective of how little the person who is making them knows about the subject on which they are commenting than they illustrate about the actual method itself. Of course, that kind of thing is unfortunately more inside the box, or typical if you will, for the thinking of a lot of people who fancy themselves fly anglers than many would like to admit. I have actually heard people claim, for example, that Skagit lines, as originally designed and employed, were too far outside the box for precisely this reason. Or my personal favorite from the past was the debate about whether nymphs are really flies. I guess some of us just have a bigger box that is more intuned with innovation than with pleasing the aesthetics of others. Thank God for it, I say. Most good things come from people who have a limited herding mentality. Traditions are meant to inform the future about the past; not constrain it.

Muckle Salmon
03-24-2006, 08:23 PM
Traditions are meant to inform the future about the past; not constrain it.

Very nice quote Grant. I hope you don"t mind if I use it in the future. As to reinventing the wheel (allthough by another method) I will leave that in the past.
Not too sure if you were denigrating my knowledge with regard to gear fishing or fly fishing but either way I don't really mind.;)

Ramsay

SILVERSCALES
03-25-2006, 11:18 PM
Hey every one,

I just meant this to be a thread about tips, did not mean to stir up anything. Just really looking for some advice on some unexplored territory (super heavy tips). Also, with all due respect to Gorman, he used those tips in a very different manner then what I am asking about. Thanks for any advice that is given.

Silverscales

Bob Pauli
03-25-2006, 11:30 PM
If you are double handing, RIO's Skagit lines have made fishing heavy tips easy. In the last year I fished several times with 500 grain 24-foot tips, using a Rio Skagit 750 line. Your 20-foot 470 grain tip will cast well with a Skagit 750.