Rain [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: Rain


andre
01-09-2006, 11:29 PM
I am about to freak'n explode. The rain is driving me batty. Just when it gets near a level I like to start fishing the jetstream turn in on us again. Well I guess the postive is more wild fish are getting through the gauntlet.

Feiger
01-10-2006, 12:48 AM
That but a few weeks ago, I read people "bitchin'" about the lack of rain and low flows in your neck of the woods.... Guess "when it rains, it pours", and yes, there can be to much of a good thing! hope you find some flow relief soon, from a look at a lot of the threads here and on the speypags forum, a lot of people are going bonkers!!

pescaphile
01-10-2006, 01:17 AM
Waaaaaaaaaaaaa so much rain! This wet part of the world has been wetter than normal. Ketchikan had 187.1" of precipitation in 2005 for it's second wettest year for the 80+ years of record. Yup that's more than 15 feet of water. Stations throughout the region have been all setting records.

October and November are especially wet. Either month can easily have 50% of Seattle's annual precip (20").

I heard a story about a girl from South Africa who was afflicted with some disease that made exposure to sunlight especially dangerous for her. Seems the Prince Rupert Visitors Assoc didn't like the publicity she got their town by moving there after her research showed that it would be the best place for someone with her condition. The girl was reportedly doing well in her new home town.

I write this after dumping my rain gage earlier... another 1.75" today. Tomorrow?

Luv2flyfish
01-10-2006, 09:57 AM
Yeah what are we at now here in Wetern Wash......like 23 days in a row or something. I have been chomping at the bit to get a line wet and it just aint going to happen for a while I am afraid. I guess there is always snowboarding......

I'm bummed....I wanna fish!

Eric
01-10-2006, 01:26 PM
Rain!

Over the New Year's Eve/Day, the Alsea began dropping from above flood (20 feet on the gauge; 18 feet is flood), and was dropping very rapidly. I got wildy excited and made plans for finally getting out just as soon as the water started to clear. Went, at last, on Tuesday, driving upstream past latte-colored flows until I got to Clemens Park, where the water was a good egg color (dirty jade) and still dropping. I figured I was in with a chance, rigged up, walked downstream to a favorite drift, looked at the water while walking, and ran a pungee maple-stick into the calf region of my waders, closer to boot than knee. I was a little non-plussed by this, as I'd planned to cross the stream if I could, and fish some runs reachable from the other side. Scrap that plan. Luckily, the near shore where I was was shallow enough that I could get out from the vines and tangles and make a cast without having the water come in the new and gaping hole. Here I was, first cast of the New Year, in a very productive drift with no one around. That alone had to be worth something.

I began to cast, and it began to pour. I mean really come down with a force that felt like tiny hammers on my shoulders. The surface of the river looked like an exploding mine field, with geysers of spray erupting all around. I fished down through as best I could, then just quit, as it was obvious the stream was rising again and turning color. I sogged and dripped back to the van, pummeled by driving rain, threw my gear in the back, put my tail between my legs, and headed home.

Oh, well, there's next week, right? One of my New Year's Resolutions is to fish at least once a week.

It's next week, the Alsea is rising again to flood after blasting winds and torrential rains came upon us the last couple of days. Instead of fishing, I'm posting this rain-soaked missive.

Andre alluded to a silver lining that the wild fish are getting upstream unmolested by the likes of us. That they are, and maybe the rains are coming to the central Oregon coast at a better time than they did last year. Last year, as some may recall, the heavy rains came in the late spring, which made for very easy travel for the out-migrating smolts, both salmon and steelhead. Those same rains, however, queered up the ocean somehow, and the algae blooms necessary for the zooplankton, necessary for the herring and anchovies, never materialized and all those smolts found themselves in an empty supermarket. We won't know the full effects of this for a couple of years, but the lack of bait was clearly evidenced by large die-offs of murres and gillemots as well as a rather lackluster ocean salmon fishery.

Maybe the rains, coming as they are supposed to, in the winter, will see better ocean conditions for the little guys that go out this year. Meanwhile, the high water will allow maximum exploitation of the small creeks by native spawning coho and steelhead.

Soaked in Waldport, waiting for next week,

Eric

andre
01-10-2006, 09:42 PM
That but a few weeks ago, I read people "bitchin'" about the lack of rain and low flows in your neck of the woods.... Guess "when it rains, it pours", and yes, there can be to much of a good thing! hope you find some flow relief soon, from a look at a lot of the threads here and on the speypags forum, a lot of people are going bonkers!!


Feiger, with 23ish days of rain wasn't no one in Ptown bitch'n bout no water. We will get our time on the river and if we don't well more unmolested fish. The only amusing stuff is when boneheads try and float the rivers in little "rubber duckys"

SSPey
01-10-2006, 09:42 PM
work is driving me batty, and my injured hand hurts to hold a rod. I couldn't fish a good hard day if I wanted to right now. This has managed to give the rain a more entertaining than annoying edge. I wonder "how high can it go, and for how long???" without really waiting for the drop.

things are different, though. To test a new line this weekend, I found myself switch casting in a fully submerged parking lot ... with flowing water!

KerryS
01-11-2006, 10:05 AM
I am kinda pissed about all of this. I just moved to a new house way up on the hill. I think if I would have stayed at the old placed I might be able to fish the backyard pretty soon.

chromer
01-11-2006, 10:21 AM
Hehe - I feel your pain.

Why did the chum salmon cross the road? Because he can! Or was that the dog lickin... never mind :hihi:

Leland Miyawaki
01-12-2006, 04:05 PM
25 days in row.

I leave for Andros on Feb. 10. I hope that when I get back the rivers will have dropped.

Leland.

andre
01-12-2006, 11:29 PM
Leland, I'll be up next week if I get a chance I'll come by.


andre

OC
01-13-2006, 08:53 AM
Was going to float today with Sean and Sinktip but we decided that floating through peoples yards and farms would not be in our best interest. Besides who wants to float through some yard with a big double wide and tons of empty cold capsule packages stuck up in tree branches from high water.

It was good to see Sean last night and catch up on his east coast happenings.

As for the rain if you look at the trending I don't think it will stop for a couple months. Ya, we will get a dry day or two here and there but the waters off of Northern Japan where all this weather orriginates is really a mess this year. And do not forget the jet stream as she seems very hunkered down and happy where she is. Anyone noticed any change yet in time of daylight? Guess with all this cloud cover it would be hard to notice.

KerryS
01-13-2006, 09:20 AM
Besides who wants to float through some yard with a big double wide and tons of empty cold capsule packages stuck up in tree branches from high water.

You must have visited Hamilton right after garbage day.

By the way garbage day in Hamilton is when the Skagit flows top 45,000 cubic feet per second.

Moonlight
01-13-2006, 02:46 PM
One positive event from the rain that I have observed were Native resident Cutthroat swimming upstream in the "Drainage Ditch" (sometimes refered to as a seasonal creek) on there spawning run from the year round streeam about a half mile West of our property, Dry Creek.
Since moving here I have gotten the neighbors to refrain from a number of practices that precluded the Cutts from being able to use this branch of the system seeing positive results is a good thing!
But just between us it can stop anytime now, thank you very much.

Whiskey Dick
01-13-2006, 09:48 PM
This is what sherarsfalls on the Deschutes should look like
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v470/steelheadr99/sherarsfalls.jpg

and this is what it looked like at the start of the year,water out the dam at 10000cfs(5300cfs normal this time of year) and over 30000cfs down stream at moody rapids at the mouth
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v470/steelheadr99/ShearsFalls.jpg

t_richerzhagen
01-14-2006, 08:17 AM
That first is a nice picture to post for scenery. The good news about the second, is you could probably run the falls and survive. I don't think I have seen it that high before.

andre
01-14-2006, 10:18 AM
Well, I'm hoping that all this high water creates positive enviromental conditions. From the removal of silt in the spawning areas to the potential changes in ocean temps and currents. Ah, wouldn't that be nice.

fredaevans
01-14-2006, 02:38 PM
12-5 to 1-5-06 was supposed to be in my motor home on the south bank of the Chetco. I'll spare you the stories about the Full Gale winds (1.5 miles up from the Ocean), rain that 'fell' level with the ground, the full floating trees, the .. fill in the blanks.

Level wise, the tires on my RV would normally be about 30 feet above water level (top of a high bank). When I pulled and skedaddled, the water was within 4 ' of the tires and still coming up.

I'm really looking forward to seeing 'what's left' of the Chetco after running in the 50-90K cfs for weeks on end.

Omar
01-14-2006, 06:39 PM
Hi folks,

Decided to check into this quality site I've been checking out for a while(Thanks Juro).
Although I'm itching to hit it, I'm kind of glad for the protracted blowout here on the N.U. As many of you know they started allowing people to bonk wild fish on the lower river last year, and there was a real carnage due to the low water conditions.:mad: The number of fish I saw on Redds seemed way down from the previous year. There has been a lot of movement of trees and gravel...a reshuffleing of the deck so to speak. Hopefully lots of fish are making it into the upper river. So be patient, this is a good thing.

Ron

Omar is my dog and favorite fishing partner

SSPey
01-14-2006, 07:50 PM
As with most other Oregon winter steelhead runs in 2005 the Umpqua run declined.
The 2004 run was 14,507 winter steelhead. The 2005 run was 7,547 with an estimated catch of 1,000 fish.

Omar
01-14-2006, 10:20 PM
As with most other Oregon winter steelhead runs in 2005 the Umpqua run declined.
The 2004 run was 14,507 winter steelhead. The 2005 run was 7,547 with an estimated catch of 1,000 fish.

With 50+ guide boats working the lower river for three+ months, most taking 2 wild a day and many boating 10+ a day, the catch/kill estimate is grossly low. There was absolutely no monitoring of the catch. Others who have been living on the river much longer than myself seemed to all be of the mind that observable spawning success was the worse they had ever seen.
Ron

SSPey
01-15-2006, 12:28 AM
either way you slice it, it is bad policy:

case A: natural fluctuations (drought and ocean conditions) are the primary cause of the 2005 drop in wild fish. If that's the case, then ODFW shouldn't be using a few good prior years as an excuse to make a ridiculous change in the regulations.

case B: harvest is the primary cause of the 2005 drop in wild fish. If that's the case, then ODFW grossly underestimates catch-and-kill potential of sport angling.

I'm with you 110% on this, especially when both A and B work together to make a bad situation (natural fluctuation) much worse for the fish

juro
01-15-2006, 08:42 AM
Steve -

What you say makes so much damn sense it drives me out of my mind that those appointed into these positions don't have any. There must be some compelling reason to make such changes, they certainly aren't based on evidence.

:mad:

t_richerzhagen
01-15-2006, 09:12 AM
Politics, is the short answer. The specific drive would be interesting to know.

Omar
01-15-2006, 11:50 AM
SSpey,

We're on the same page. Unfortunately the "harvest" mentality is pervasive in the state and especially so in the southwest region.

OC
01-17-2006, 11:35 AM
Might as well put your gear in storage for awhile. Three big storms in the northern pacific moving east towards our west coast. And there is another one forming off of northern Japan as I post. Better take up surfing.

Moonlight
01-17-2006, 12:01 PM
Everytime it Rains out here on the OP there are subtle and some (notso subtle) changes in the paths of our Glaicial Rivers this year there have been many changes in between floods that nobody ever even got to see. I wonder if any of them were the type we would rate as the best I ever fished?:smokin:
Things haven't gotten totally too high as far as flooding the roads and creating 40 acre mudslides (yet), but each week the rivers have gotten high enough and stayed that high for long enough to effect many many changes. I certainly hope alot of fish spawned in the tributaries this past Fall most of the mainstem spots are seriously changed enough to diminish there chances of survival.

pescaphile
01-17-2006, 09:42 PM
Methinks more like the best you never fished;)

fredaevans
01-22-2006, 06:30 AM
http://www.dfw.state.or.us/fish/fish_counts/

Not sure if you fellows are aware of the fish counts for the NU, Upper Rogue, etc. The North Umpqua's are take at Winchester Dam right off I-5. The Rogues at Gold Ray dam just north of Medford.