HELP IS THERE [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: HELP IS THERE


striblue
07-27-2005, 10:20 PM
Be Vigalant about your loved ones....I am determined to start a process ...legally... to make it more simple to get medical help for those suffering mental illnesss... We need to be able to get them to the hospital. NO QUESTIONS ASKED.. mid night raids if necessary... you get the picture.. This has gone far enough.... Don't listern to them... they can talk you out of it.... Learn about Bi polar and paranoid behaviour.. recognizie it early.... Make that move that I did not... they are clever.. You can take temporary custody.. there are solutions even if the final results end up as a falure. PS.. I will dedicated the rest of my life to this issue and as a lawyer I will find all the ways to FORCE mdical teatment on them. I m now retired, I will do this... PLEASE BE VIGELANT!

Dble Haul
07-28-2005, 08:02 AM
John-

Very often, tragedy brings other things with it. Sometimes these things shed light on certain situations, and what is learned via the loss of a loved one can be used to help others. It sounds like this is happening with you, and I truly wish you all the best in this endeavor. Use the resources that you have, and in time you will certainly make progress.

Best of luck to you.

juro
07-28-2005, 08:15 AM
John -

A very important cause. So many I have known could have benefited from such awareness. Let me know how I can help.

baldmountain
07-28-2005, 09:22 AM
I will dedicated the rest of my life to this issue and as a lawyer I will find all the ways to FORCE medical treatment on them.

I don't know anything about your situation, but this is a dangerous place to go.

In America we have a LONG history of protecting people's rights even if it is bad for them in the long run. I think you will have a hard time convincing anyone that being able to force medical treatment on others is a good thing. It opens too many doors for unhappy kids/spouses/parents to force medical treatment on someone because they are having problems with them and they "need" it.

I think I understand how you feel. I got to see how the law works close up. Last summer I lost my mom to Alzheimer's. I got to see how the entire disease process works, and how it affects family members. I got to see my dad spend his life savings trying to take care of my mom and save his house. I got to see my mom suffer for a long time because the law protects her right to live and a family member's hope that someday she may get better even though the disease process destroys the brain and there is no hope of recovery. Instead of passing with dignity, my mom passed in pain and without the ability to recognize her own children and grandchildren all because of the laws protecting her rights.

DFix
07-28-2005, 09:42 AM
You have my full and complete support.

dewey
07-28-2005, 05:37 PM
Two families I am close to have experienced fatalities from mental illness in the last couple of years. It is absolutely devastating.
My sympathy and full support are with you and your endeavor.
The other component of this is educating people of the nature and treatability of such illnesses. Often, families do not even know it is a medical issue until after something tragic occurs.
Best of luck.

Paxton
07-28-2005, 07:41 PM
John, I am truely saddened by your and your children's loss. I have no doubt that you and your family did everything you knew to do. The "system" is definetly not user friendly for families and there are no advocate agencies that can provide consultation on how to access assistance.
I totally agree with Geoff...patients' rights get in the way of the patient having the right to live a normal life. In this country, those rights are a sacred cow and most likely untouchable. If the affected person refuses evaluation and or help...at this time that puts a roadblock on accessing help. My wife used to be a nurse in a nursing home....due to patient rights, physically unstable patients who also did not have their mental faculties could not even have a belt across their wheelchairs as a reminder, because it infringed on their rights....so what happened over and over.....they got up, fell, broke a hip, became bed ridden and developed pnenomia and died within 2 months.....these are rights????!!!
My thought is that families need to have an alternative means to document the risk of thier loved one's mental illness....such as....presenting video tape info of their behavior to a psychiatrist and or board in lieu of an in office formal eval with the patient. Of course that may constitute a violation of their rights to privacy :-(
Best wishes John to you and your children.
Sincerely,
Ron

Philster
07-29-2005, 11:58 AM
As someone who witnessed the decline, or should I say rise of street life in california after the involuntary commitment laws were gutted under governor Reagan, I find it ironic that the "personal rights" advocates are so quick to say "it takes a village to raise a child" but scream bloody murder when the village tries to do the best by an adult who doesn't have the capacity to do what's right for themselves... But then again, in most cases children are cuter, and as we often see in the environmental and species protection laws, cute matters.