The Essential Angler - First Aid and Clothing [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: The Essential Angler - First Aid and Clothing


DEERHAAWK
03-20-2005, 06:31 PM
Reciently, a poll was conducted here by Chris Chin for First Aid kits. 43% said they had one that they carried, with 25% saying they had one with CPR updated. Thats 68% by my calcs. It should be 100% that have working First Aid Kits in there possesion at all times! Sorry, but no excuse for this one.
If you spend anytime away from home for any reason, you should have a fully loaded portable First Aid Kit with you. End of discussion! Without it your lost in a critical situation. They run fron $10-$20.- not a huge outlay by any means. When you get it, purchase an extra box of assort. band-aids, cause its my experience that you will eat up more of these than anything else, along with your favorite topical dressing (Neosporin)
Below is a picture of my kit. Its custom made to fit my needs. I reload it about every 3-4 months. As I said, it sits behind my front seat, clearly marked! I also carry smaller versions of the same kit, one in each of my Packs. A Google search of "first aid kit contents" raised 1.1 million hits, so you should be able to find one that gives you a list of stuff if you want to build your own. With that said, you should also have a basic knowledge of First Aid. Civic organizations around town give First Aid / CPR classes, take one, it's a good thing to know!

CLOTHING;
In the N.W. we have a wide range of weather conditions, not unlike other parts of the country. I have bar-b-q'ed on the beach in Jan. and been caught in the mountains with snow down to 1500' in the middle of June. With each condition, the clothing I had played the most critical role as to weither I was comfortable and having fun, or miserable and hating life!

SYNTHETICS IN THE WINTER;
Reason? Wicking!
You want the moisture from your body to be moved from the surface (skin) and dissapated, synthetics do this best!
There are, again, many products out there on the market. A rule of thumb I use is products that are for snow skiing. These have been researched and tested over the years. But they can be spendy, and right now is the time of year to buy them. Spring when the season is over, sporting goods stores and ski shops drop prices to dump this years products. You as the Flyfisherman can score what you need for the rest of this year, and be set-up for next year for little cash!

COTTON IN THE SUMMER (TROPICS)
For me it's all about Cotton in the Summer and Tropical Climes. Cool and light weight it works! But even in the Summer, I have a stash of Synthetics in my pack, cause when the sun goes down I want to be comfy!

LAYERING;
Performance Base Layer: 2 choices, Lightweight and Expidition Weight.
Lightweight - For persons who are particular about oz's, lightweight base clothing is good. It can be worn alone, or in combo. as a Performance Base Layer. They are for the most part quick drying, wick well, and are warm in mild to cool conditions. I have a set (top and bottoms) I love them.
Expidition Weight - This is my preference for backountry travel. This is usually thicker, micro-fleece, and hold up better to more extreme weather conditions.
The difference in "Carry Weight" and "Pack Space Used" is minimal. I have found no difference in wicking or moisture dispersal between the 2. Both are synthetic.

Mid Layer: This is personal preference, and I go about 50/50 between synthetic and cotton. I know I might get some flack for this, but I like jeans. They are light-mid weight, and you can beat the crap out of them, wash them in a stream on a rock, dry them in front of the fire, and wear them the next day. But they do take up pack space, and when the weather gets ugly, well I do opt for the alternatives.

SOCKS AND BOOTS:Socks, I use cotton, I dont like wool, and cotton hasn't let me down yet......But I do insist on a GOOD waterproff Hiking boot! Nothing worse than wet feet. I will spend $100.-+ on a good pair of boots.

EXTRAS: My arsinal against the cold also includes micro fleece cap, gloves and mittens, neck gaiter and head band. In the winter I carry a pair of bib ski pants/waterproof

Here is a short list;
1 each base layer top and pant
2 each mid layer top (short and long sleeve) and pant
2 each pairs of socks
2 each pairs briefs or boxers
1 fleece pullover with high collar and/or hood - pockets
1 fleece vest with high zip collar
1 fleece jacket zip front high collar/hood - pockets

RAINGEAR: You should have a set of packable/breathable rain gear. Jacket with hood and pants

Note: 90% of your body heat is lost thru the Head and Neck!!!

Below is also a picture of my Large pack with some of it's contents removed. Rolled clothing takes up less space than folded clothing.

Monday I will talk about Food and Hydration.
DH

fcch
03-27-2005, 03:22 PM
DH,

Nice post !! Won't get into the clothing as you did a fine job. Here's the kit that STAYS in the truck. When I float we have another kit all ready in a Baja Bag.
http://www.njflyfishing.com/photopost/data/533/medium/composite_pg.jpg

Use this link to get the full size image:
http://www.njflyfishing.com/photopost/showphoto.php?photo=2221
Some of the less obvious items

Epipen
Speed splints
Major hemorage pads
Seatbelt cutter
Tie wraps (long enough to make handcuffs)
Felt pen marker
Treatment log
1.5 liters sterile water
Cervical collar
AR mask
20 triangular bandages (takes a min. of 14 to secure a backboard, so I like extras)
3 pairs surgical gloves


I've been caught short on a few occassions (car accidents), ... NEVER again,... Also, as a part time Guide, I feel I have the obligation to be ready.