Green Highlander [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: Green Highlander


Charlie
12-29-2004, 08:54 AM
After being inspired by the fantastic Green Highlanders tied by Speydoc and Sean I decided to do one of my own. Havenít tied one of these in a long time so I did make a few mistakes but I was satisfied overall.

Charlie.

grouseman
12-29-2004, 09:04 AM
Beautiful fly. What did you dub the thorax with? Why is the hookeye a different color than the shank of the hook?

Charlie
12-29-2004, 09:40 AM
grouseman,

The body is SLF (probably a little to bright for this fly). And as for the eye, it is made of silkworm gut. It is a more traditional material that was used for eyes before hook-making technology came to where it is today.

Charlie.

Igor
12-29-2004, 09:53 AM
"...so I did make a few mistakes but I was satisfied overall."

Where??!!

Where are the mistakes?!

Dang, Mr. 'D', you're *killing* me!

*g*

Igor

fishinfool
12-29-2004, 09:55 AM
That is simply a gorgeous fly. If you want to do more practice and cull out this kind of 'mistake laden" sample, I would be glad to get rid of them for you. I would even pay postage and the like to help you out. You are a superb tier!!!!
John

speydoc
01-01-2005, 01:03 PM
Charlie
Nice tie, I like the brightness of the SLF! Tweeking the traditionals with modern materials only enhances these flys - I am sure Kelson and his contempories would have jumped at the oportunity if the materials had been available back then.
speydoc

flytyer
01-01-2005, 08:51 PM
Charlie,

It is very nice seeing classics, small mistakes and all :wink: , still being tied. Nicely done P-T version.

Speydoc,

I agree wholeheartedly that Kelson, Price-Tannant, Hale, etc. would have used many of the materials we have available to use today in their flies.

h2o
01-02-2005, 06:25 AM
Thanks !
Keep posting them pictures...............
I like the SLF also.

speyflyfisher
01-03-2005, 11:48 PM
After seening all the greenhighlanders posted I decided to tie a few of my own

Bob Pauli
01-04-2005, 12:36 AM
If I asked to see one of these classiscs soaking wet hanging from a leader and being pulled through shallow water. Is video available?

I sure would like to see that fly fished.

speydoc
01-04-2005, 01:09 AM
Speyflyfisher
Very nice!
speydoc

flytyer
01-04-2005, 02:43 AM
Speyflyfisher,

Very nice indeed!

Bob,

Classics work pretty well. I recall one April day when Sinktip rowed his boat over to the other side of a run on the Sauk to retrieve a Kate from a low hanging branch I managed to cast it into because he felt it was too nice a fly to leave decorating the foliage (or was that polluting the landscape with it :eek: ).

Charlie
01-04-2005, 08:52 AM
Speyflyfisher,

A few nice variations. Like the one in the middle the best but they are all fantastic.

flytyer,

I agree. Having one chewed up by a fish would probably give one a feeling of satisfaction. Loosing one in a tree would just plain suck!

Charlie.

flytyer
01-04-2005, 02:54 PM
Charlie,

But most of them were originally designed and tied to fish with, so losing one now and again goes with the territory. Losing them occassionally also probably helped spur the movement to the easier to tie hairwings in the early to mid-20th century. But my some of them sure swim nice if dressed with low set wings.

speyflyfisher
01-04-2005, 11:13 PM
Most of the classics fish very well. If you want to see one on a leader swing
through the water, you only have a few months to wait. While I was learning to
tie Atlantic salmon flies, I figured the flies wont come out looking like something
I would want to save. So I tied on return wire hooks or used braided dacron instead of gut. I fish them frequently in the spring though usually not on runs were I hang up a lot. There is nothing better than seeing a fish roll in a run and switching to a full dress fly for the grab. That is the exact reason there is a popham in my fishing box. Here are some pics of flies from my fishing box most have been a time or two

Speyflyfisher

speydoc
01-04-2005, 11:34 PM
Speyflyfisher
Again very nice - do you have close ups on the bottom two on the right hand box, please!
speydoc

speyflyfisher
01-04-2005, 11:46 PM
Here they are. I also cropped out the greenhighlander thats waiting for the
right day and a pool of fresh chum's

speydoc
01-04-2005, 11:51 PM
Speyflyfisher - thanks again.
speydoc

flytyer
01-05-2005, 03:19 PM
Speyflyfisher,

You bet there is nothing like the look of a classic full dressed featherwing as it swims in the water. My two favorites are the Kate and Kelson's Purple Emperor, and I don't fish them though grabby runs either.

Igor
01-06-2005, 09:43 AM
"Losing them occassionally also probably helped spur the movement to the easier to tie hairwings in the early to mid-20th century. "

Hmmm, I wonder if the unavailability of some of the exotic plumage of the day may have also helped spur the trend towards hair-wings.

Easy-to-tie is relative, don't you think? *g*

Igor

GPearson
01-06-2005, 11:53 AM
SpeyFlyFisher,

Very nice! I really like the "fishy" look of the last two.

What are you using as your Indian Crow sub?

And what are you building your eyes out of on the fishing blind eyes? I have started using 50 lb. gell spun tied in the entire length of the body but have not fished them yet so I am curious if you have had any problems.

Thanks,

Greg


PS. Charlie, nice highlander dude!

flytyer
01-06-2005, 04:03 PM
Igor,

Tyers have always substituted natural or dyed materials for that which they could no longer get at a reasonable price for fishing flies. This inlcudes Kelson, Hale, Hardy, Maxwell, Price-Tannant, etc. the master of old, as they each mentioned in their books. So I submit that the availability or unavailability of a material had little if anything to do with the decline of the married wing, built wing, or whole feather wing classics, which included the decline of the speys and dees.

And it does take more skill to tie a married wing, spey or dee fly than the vast majority of hair wings. It takes more skill to tie a feather wing on so that it lays in a straight verticle plane than it doesn to tie a wad of hair in for a wing. It also takes a lot more skill to tie dee wings so they lay properly than a rabbit strip, a bunch of marabou, or some hair. Not to mention the additional skill it takes to tie tail veiling, body joints, sides, cheeks, and horns on a fly or the skill involved in constructing a married wing. If it didn't, all of us who teach others to tie flies would have no problem having folks tie a classic fly in a beginners tying class, but we have no qualms about including a hairwing salmon or steelhead fly in a beginnners class.

Greg,

Steve Gobin has used 30# dacron backing for many years as an eye loop on his fishing flies with no problems. And he simply ties it in with Danville Flymaster or 8/0 Uni-Thread and then puts a coat of head cement on the wraps holding it to the hook. I have never had a problem with 20# braided mono tied in the same way as Steve ties in dacron, so you shouldn't have a problem with the gel spun.

sean
01-06-2005, 04:50 PM
Greg my only concern with 50 gelspun would be its inherit ability to cut through anything. It can be pretty nasty stuff and I would fear it would cut right through your mono leader once a fish really started tugging on it. Maybe not and let us know how it goes.

Igor,

Just got through Price-Tannant's classic and I was surprised to hear him talking about issues obtaining the exact same materials you hear people complain about not being able to get nowadays. Seems like nothing has changed much in the last 100 years with the exception that some tiers have found even more suitable substitutes since his book was written. We have a lot more materials to incorporate into full dressed flies than those guys could ever have imagined. Look at the 'freestyle' full dressed tiers like Ronn Lucas. He has taking those basic techniques you gain from the classic patterns and has really helped bring full dressed tying into the 21st century with his use of widely available new school materials. He has proven to me that you do not need indian crow, heron, etc to tie in the way of the old masters.

They fell out of favor IMHO because they are the master class of all fly tying. Quite simply they are the most technical of all patterns and demand the best out of a tier. One of my main reasons for exploring salmon flies was to further enhance my tying skills. These patterns expand your tying abilities so much and the skills learned trickle down to every pattern you tie. With the limited dabbling I have done in full dressed flies all the flies I regularly use are already looking 100% better. I find myself paying more attention to the bodies , ribbing, hackling, and proportion of all my flies because full dressed flies demand you pay attention to those things. It has really opened my eyes as far as tying is concerned. All of the true masters of our craft that I look up to are outstanding full dressed tiers. I do not think that is a coincidence. You aint going to get that schooling from hairwings.

In this new era of give it to me now fly fishing very few guys really want to spend the time that some of us are willing to invest in the art. Why learn to tie to perfection when a hunk of rabbit will work. For me tying is not solely about hooking fish and tradition is a big thing to me. Learning full dressed techniques is a way for me to help keep that tradition alive. Even if it is going to take me a couple years of practice to get to the place where I do the old masters justice :rolleyes:

I look at it the same way as if I was a trout fisherman. You bet I would be spending a lot of time learning how to properly dress Catskill dry flies. IMHO they are the master class of trout flies and once you master them everything else will fall into place.

Sorry for being so long winded,

-sean

speyflyfisher
01-06-2005, 10:14 PM
Greg
I have always used 30# backing for my blind eye fishing flies.
I put down a tread fondation on the hook shank and double the backing
to form the loop and wrap back over most of the hook shank. I then hit
it with superglue. I have yet to have one pull loose. I haven't landed that
many fish on these flies yet. As to a crow sub I use ring neck feather dyed
in the fashion discribed in Tying the Classic Salmon Fly: A Modern Approach to Traditional Techniques by Michael D. Radencich. I also use red bishop (aka: weaver bird) and flamed scarlet minivet. Here is a link to a discription of
the technique. I will also try to take a picture of the various subs and the one
real crow that I have for an example.

speyflyfisher

http://www.feathersmc.com/articles.php?ID=7

speydoc
01-08-2005, 10:45 PM
Flytyer/Speyflyfisher
Or anyone else - any comments on dacron vs. braided nylon as loops on blindeyes for fishing purposes?
speydoc

flytyer
01-08-2005, 10:51 PM
Speydoc,

They both work well, although I prefer the braided mono because it is stiffer than the dacron.

speydoc
01-08-2005, 11:45 PM
Thanks Flytyer - I was leaning towards the braider nylon as I think is looks better, but was wondering if the dacron had any functional advantage.
speydoc

Charlie
01-10-2005, 08:50 AM
flytyer turned me on to the braided mono a while back and it has served me very well. I also think it looks better on the fly than dacron since it is more translucent. Not that this matters for fishing but what the Hell! :cool:

Charlie.