Half 'n' Half [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: Half 'n' Half


peter-s-c
11-25-2004, 12:28 PM
Now that the wintry weather is on the horizon, the dead drift is going to be more prevalent than the swing, unless we get nice sunny days.

Figured the best approach might be half 'n' half; an upstream and across cast with dead drift using an indicator then when the bottom of the dead drift is reached, then swing it out.

What flies would you use for this? I have a wounded/dead minnow pattern that I plan on using but I'm looking for other suggestions. This pattern has only had success on hickory shad when used with a straight retrieve so it's an unknown for this application.

http://www.mountaincable.net/~pcharles/spoonfly.jpg

Here's what it looks like. It uses lead foil bent around the curve of an Alex Jackson style spey hook. It wobbles and tumbles as it goes.

Shaq
11-29-2004, 09:31 AM
i WOULD THINK ANY BUGGER/SUCKER/LEECH PATTERN WOULD BE EFFECTIVE FOR THAT, ALSO A LARGE RUBBER-LEGGED STONEFLY MIGHT PROVIDE GOOD MOVEMENT. I REMEMBER MATT SUPINSKI'S BOOK AND PASSAGES ABOUT USING FLIES WITH "MOTION WITHOUT MOVEMENT. SOME SORT OF FLESH FLY AS WELL WOULD WORK IE WHITE AND ORANGE MARABOU SPEY TYPE FLY

Willie Gunn
11-29-2004, 12:01 PM
Not what I was expecting. A half & half is a half pint of beer and a small whisky.

removed_by_request
11-29-2004, 12:03 PM
would rather have a black and tan, very tatsy if poured right..

Shaq
11-29-2004, 12:09 PM
After a day of steelheading in January I'd rather have a pint of whisky and a small beer

Willie Gunn
11-29-2004, 01:29 PM
Not what I was expecting. A half & half is a half pint of beer and a small whisky.

In seperate glasses, in case you mis understood, the idea is that you don't get full before you get drunk and drunk before you get full.

Shaq
11-29-2004, 01:32 PM
Who cares!!! my best fly patterns were just sitting on the vise in the morning after nights like those. I think little elves made them

removed_by_request
11-29-2004, 07:57 PM
whisky is not meant to get drunk on, savor it and enjoy its warmth like one does a beautiful woman.

peter-s-c
11-29-2004, 08:13 PM
I like the way this thread ended up much better than the way it started. :)

(hick)

Shaq
11-30-2004, 07:42 AM
whisky is not meant to get drunk on, savor it and enjoy its warmth like one does a beautiful woman.


I don't consider Whisky and Scotch the same...2 beem and cokes then three fingers of Glen. Now that's a nice vise session

removed_by_request
11-30-2004, 07:56 AM
someone correct me if I am wrong, always thought whisky was Scotch and whiskey is that swill that jack daniels makes.

Shaq
11-30-2004, 08:08 AM
Don't get down on the Jack D, you never know when you might be five months and 26 miles from Dillingham Alaska drinking "Northern Lights" Canadian Whisky from a plastic bottle mixed with diet generic cola. Aaahh that takes me back.

removed_by_request
11-30-2004, 09:13 AM
if it must be mixed with anything other than water than it's not worth putting in your gullet.

a good single malt will stand on its own my man.

Dornblaser
11-30-2004, 04:49 PM
Reverse half 'n half - I was recently up on my regular river and the water was stained and a little higher and faster than it has been. I started out mending to a swing and then dead drifted. I was typically letting my wife fish the pool and I would fish the tail out. It worked on the first cast. Truth be told, I had not thought out how to best work the water before I cast as I was watching my wife's casting.

When it starts to ice I up I will dead drift with a sink tip.

Single malts and a cigar for if I am not driving. One Bass or micro-brew if I am the driver. :hihi:

Dornblaser
11-30-2004, 04:52 PM
someone correct me if I am wrong, always thought whisky was Scotch and whiskey is that swill that jack daniels makes

Whisky, is something that is best enjoyed neat.

peter-s-c
11-30-2004, 04:56 PM
if it must be mixed with anything other than water than it's not worth putting in your gullet.

a good single malt will stand on its own my man.

That should be pasted above every bar.

Peter (who'll only admit to a drop of water when it's cask strength)