Lamson Litespeed change in surface coating ? [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: Lamson Litespeed change in surface coating ?


AdrianV
09-24-2004, 03:14 AM
I recently ordered a Litespeed 3 in Guide finish.
When I received it I noticed that the coating was not the same dull
coating as the one I am already using. It is more shiny like the smoke
finish ones.
Next to the fact that I prefer having the same finish sparespools as the reel if I still buy some, I wonder if the coating is of the same quality as on the dull ones.
Anthing known about this in the forum ?

AdrianV

Skycries57
09-25-2004, 02:14 AM
From what I understand, the standard guide finish is a flat-like type 3 finish, and the newer smoke finish is a type 2. I would call up Waterworks on your reel to get a straight answer. Can you post a pic of what you think is a newer guide finish, I'm curious on what it looks like. Thanks!

Peter ><>

Greg Pavlov
09-25-2004, 07:47 AM
From what I understand, the standard guide finish is a flat-like type 3 finish, and the newer smoke finish is a type 2. I would call up Waterworks on your reel to get a straight answer. Can you post a pic of what you think is a newer guide finish, I'm curious on what it looks like. Thanks!><>
He's not just "thinking," he is right: I have a 4.0 with the same finish.

AdrianV
10-01-2004, 05:30 AM
Through my dealer I received an answer concerning the changed surfacecoating:
" The Waterworks ULA and Lamson Litespeed reels are finished in Type 3, sometimes called "hard anodize" or "ceramic anodize". Type 3 anodize results in a finish that is, on average 20/1000 thick -- ten times thicker than Type 2. In Type 3, the surface aluminum is actually converted to a ceramic material (this is not the case with Type 2). That's why the ULA and Litespeed reels have the look and texture of pottery -- the surface is actually a hard ceramic. The ceramic material is harder than the Type 2 finish. So the ULA and Litespeed finish is not only 10 times thicker, but is comprised of a harder material.
The actual "finish" (anodize) has NOT changed -- it's exactly the same. But previously we were "bead blasting" the reels as a last step before anodize. The bead blasting process was necessary to create a uniform surface. While this resulted in a uniform finish, it also produced a porous surface that was somewhat objectionable to the touch & created a greater challenge to keep clean.
Over time our machining results have improved to the point where bead blasting is no longer necessary. And so this is the change: we no longer bead blast before anodize. This allows the surface to remain smooth (and therefore feels better and stays cleaner). We think it's a more beautiful look, with a little higher sheen.
A picture showing (as good as possible) the two types of coating is included.

hnl
10-02-2004, 10:42 AM
A,
I had a few of the "old" finished reels and noticed that my line would get stripped of some of its coating when I stripped my line off the reel. I didn't pull the line straight out, but rubbed it on the cross bar whose rough surface removed some material form the line. The new finish should eliminate the prob.
Herb

AdrianV
10-11-2004, 02:37 AM
Herb,
Sorry about replying late.
I hope you are wright about the smoothness of the lineguide on the reel.
Speaking about it, is it not strange that on most reels the cross bar is on the underside of it ? :confused: It seems to me to be most ideal if reels would have two cross bars, at an angle of about 100-110 degrees and 240-250 degrees. In that way the line is not damaged if pulled out by you nor by a running fish.
Still you see only few reels made this way.
Adrian

hnl
10-11-2004, 09:41 AM
A,
Reels that I have used that had crosspieces other than "North" and "South" seemed to enable line to wrap around reel while casting. I guess this could be eliminated with better line hand mechanics - but I have enough problems without worrying about that. Don't forget that you should not change spools when either of them are wet. You don't want to get moisture in the clutch. I loved mine. Smooth drag, nice capacity, sturdy - thought the handle too small. I had caught a nice snook from the beach. With no one to help me take a picture, I laid her on the sand next to the rod/reel for perspective (the reel in my hat) when the fish flipped, covering the reel with sand. All I had to do was swoosh the reel around in the water to remove all the sand. Continued fishing. Similiar thing happened with my Abel and my fishing day was ended.
Keep well,
Herb