orvis t3 rod [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: orvis t3 rod


rfmercier
06-24-2004, 06:26 PM
I am new to serious fly fishing. I have scheduled a trip to Montana in August. I am cosidering buying a 5wt Orvis T3 rod. Any suggestions? Good choice?

Thanks for any comments.

Bob Mercier



. .

brooklynangler
06-24-2004, 09:40 PM
No reason to spend that kind of money if you don't want to. There are no qualitative differences between that rod and certain lower cost ones.

I would look closely at the Temple Forks TiCR rods. Same kind of very modern, GLX-style fast action as the T3. You could get two for the price of one T3 and, again, there is no qualitative difference.

In the "two-for one" zone I'd also think about the lower end Sage rods...excellent rods in the under $300. The cheaper ones also have a much more useful casting stroke than some of the higher end sage single handers.

If are comfortable with spending $500+, then Thomas and Thomas, Scott, and Steffen Brothers are builders of merit who take the time to spline their rods and are very careful about construction methods.

Finally, I'd think also about a cane rod if I were inclined to spend $600+ on a trout rod. Graphite rods have a tendency of being almost valueless a few years after purchase. Not so with cane. Look up makers such as Jeff Fultz, A.J. Thramer, Mike Brooks. These guys are making affordable ($600-900) cane rods that are every bit as good as the best graphite rods of today. Forget about cane being slow and sloppy. AND, your rod will likely appreciate handsomely so that you may even profit from the purchase. At the least you'll break even. That simply will not happen with a graphite rod.

Just my 2 cents, but I urge you to support the sponsors of this board in any event.

BEst-

J. West

rfmercier
06-26-2004, 09:07 AM
No reason to spend that kind of money if you don't want to. There are no qualitative differences between that rod and certain lower cost ones.

I would look closely at the Temple Forks TiCR rods. Same kind of very modern, GLX-style fast action as the T3. You could get two for the price of one T3 and, again, there is no qualitative difference.

In the "two-for one" zone I'd also think about the lower end Sage rods...excellent rods in the under $300. The cheaper ones also have a much more useful casting stroke than some of the higher end sage single handers.

If are comfortable with spending $500+, then Thomas and Thomas, Scott, and Steffen Brothers are builders of merit who take the time to spline their rods and are very careful about construction methods.

Finally, I'd think also about a cane rod if I were inclined to spend $600+ on a trout rod. Graphite rods have a tendency of being almost valueless a few years after purchase. Not so with cane. Look up makers such as Jeff Fultz, A.J. Thramer, Mike Brooks. These guys are making affordable ($600-900) cane rods that are every bit as good as the best graphite rods of today. Forget about cane being slow and sloppy. AND, your rod will likely appreciate handsomely so that you may even profit from the purchase. At the least you'll break even. That simply will not happen with a graphite rod.

Just my 2 cents, but I urge you to support the sponsors of this board in any event.

BEst-

J. West
J. West..............Thanks for the info, just the kind of answer I was hoping for. I'm off to check into Temple Forks and Sage.
Bob Mercier

brooklynangler
06-26-2004, 08:44 PM
No prblem Bob. One thing I didn't make clear that perhaps you know is that the t3 rods are offered in a bunch of different actions, from super fast to medium. If you like a more medium-actioned rod (loads to the mid on full line weight casts...my defininition, perhaps not standard), then the lower-priced Temple Fork rods are an even better buy. The TiCRs that I tried are REALLY fast. Perhaps faster than I'd care to use for trout fishing...but that's just me.

Cheers and good luck-

Joe

Cole
06-29-2004, 11:10 AM
Most of the previously mentioned rods are probably fine. My best advice would be to try a few rods yourself, and see what you find most comfortable casting. I tried out a T3 4 weight, which has a medium action, about 2 months ago, and was impressed. I definately think they are the best rods Orvis has made, they load and shoot pretty efficiently. The key is trying out rods of all types I think.

Tarpon Chaser
06-30-2004, 04:44 PM
I agree - best way is to try them out and forget the name on the rod. Choose the one that works best for you. Having said that, I own an Orvis T3 and it is the sweetest rod I have ever cast.

They were also absolutely fantastic when it came to replacing my previous Orvis (the same cannot be said for St Croix, but I worked through their agent in another country, so maybe they're not so bad if you deal with them directly).

On this point - even if I was bargain huniting, I'd definitely go for a rod that carries a guarantee...