Flies for outer beaches? [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: Flies for outer beaches?


Mattb
06-24-2004, 09:00 AM
I'm thinking of heading down to the cape this weekend, probably just poking around on the outer beaches and I'm looking for suggestions on any out of the ordinary flies I might want to have in my box. I have tonight and tomorrow to tie, and I've already got more of the standbys than I could ever use.

Also, anyone have a good idea of how long it takes to get to, say, Nauset from the Concord, NH area? Yahoo says 3 hours, but that sounds awful high to me.

Thanks,
Matt

jfbasser
06-24-2004, 09:11 AM
Three hours is about right with low traffic volume.

juro
06-24-2004, 09:26 AM
During the day I would stick with sand eel patterns with an up-riding hook fished right on the sand and branch out from there as needed. Always keep an eye out for pods as there are still a few moving through. Sinking lines are the best approach, intermediates second best. Floating lines are for the specialized flatwing applications, which could be fun too but putting the fly on the sand and twitchy retrieves will yield the most fish during the day.

Casting distance == more coverage == more hookups, not necessarily about reaching fish but about keeping the fly in play with all that surf turbulence trying to cut it short. When pods come in, it could very well be about distance but not for the grubbers along the shore.

At night push some water with some big dark nasty bulk and search for the big cruisers, there have been plenty of them around so an encounter is not at all unlikely. Just be careful to watch wind direction and play along with it at night especially to avoid serious injury. A two-handed cross-body cast comes to mind in the prevailing south winds on Nauset which causes righty casters to otherwise turn their backs to the waves and cast backward.

Tidal inlets like Chatham Inlet, Nauset Inlet are great bets on tide changes. Fish have entered the estuaries and are also providing good sight fishing opportunities in the shallows. On outgoing tides, the fast water provides easy feeding for big fish in the soft layer just above the sand. Hi-density lines and hook up sand eel flies rule there again, more swing and twitch than strip and you can even feed line back out after a few strips to extend the swing.

I could talk all day but gotta work, good luck!

striblue
06-24-2004, 10:10 AM
A great fly for both day and night is Harry Koon's Rats Arse. Go Chartruese for day and dark olive black for night.