Presentation: Dan Rawding WDFW Region 5 biologist. [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: Presentation: Dan Rawding WDFW Region 5 biologist.


rich_simms
04-29-2004, 02:40 PM
Wild Steelhead Coalition
What: The May General meeting
When: May 5th
Where: Bothell American Legion
Time: 7-9 meeting and swap steelhead lies in the bar. 6-7

General meeting

Presentation:
Dan Rawding WDFW Region 5 biologist.

The Talk:
The Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment model (EDT) was develop in the 1990's by Mobrand Biometrics. It relates salmon and steelhead performance to the quality and quantity of stream habitat. WDFW has used the EDT model to assess current steelhead performance, to set subbasin goals, and to develop habitat protection and restoration strategies. The EDT model has broad application for steelhead populations through out Washington and has been used extensively on the Columbia River. This presentation focuses on WDFW application of the EDT model to Lower Columbia River winter and summers steelhead populations.

Background:
Dan Rawding graduated from the University of
Washington with a Bachelor of Science in Fisheries Science in 1982. He has worked with salmon and trout for over 20 years as a biologist and a fishing guide in Washington and Alaska. During his initially employment he assessed salmon habitat, monitored recreational fisheries, and conducted surveys to monitor adult and juvenile salmon and troutpopulations. During the last decade as a stock assessment specialist, Dan supervised programs to monitor salmon and steelhead escapement, and develop recreational fishery management plans. He is currently working with other scientists, as a member of the National Marine Fisheries Service Technical
Recovery Team, to develop de-listing goals for
threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead populations in the Willamette and Lower Columbia Rivers.
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Sincerely,
Rich
“…I know that neither hatcheries, nor biologist, nor all the thought and ingenuity of man can put them back when once they’ve gone” (Haig-Brown, Fisherman’s Spring, 1951)