The Benefits of Flyfishing [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: The Benefits of Flyfishing


juro
09-20-2003, 08:59 AM
After a fairly solid season of flyfishing, I recently had a long stint without time on the water. Aside from the sense of anxiety, I had a really interesting experience when I finally got some time on the water and came home again...

my senses had become dramatically sharpened by the time I spent immersed in nature.

Let's face it, we are inseperable from earth, in all manner linked to her - mentally, physically and strangely even subconsciously. Suddenly I am seeing, thinking, reacting, dreaming with renewed clarity. My mind is stimulated from all the recent synaptic fireworks of my imagination exploring the possibilities of what stealthy tan and gold submarine might be lying under the guise of that standing wave, or painting images in the minds eye based on a glimmer of bait here or there, or even more profoundly from the emergence of a large fish from it's cloaked disguise in a shadowy channel to the sandy lane where my fly settles near the sand as I stand trying to be part of the scenery in the seconds of anticipation before the first strip in the fish's kill zone that triggers his fins to flare and rush to the fly, his large eyes visibly focused on the darting fly, his massive illusion of a body becoming crystal clear in the attack maneuver...

We were meant to be out there, perhaps even more than we know. I wonder what the rest of the human race does for redemption. Perhaps not enough.

striblue
09-20-2003, 01:08 PM
THUMBS UP!!!!!!!!!

BobK
09-20-2003, 01:33 PM
We are still "hunter-gatherers". It's in our genes. And it's something we MUST do. You're right - it keeps our senses razor sharp, and our reflexes fast, and our appreciation for nature and our creator strong.

I've tried just walking the streams, woods and shores, even with a camera, but without a "real purpose" for being there, and it's just not the same.

People who don't do it just are boring as hell. And they don't understand. But take a kid, and let him (or her) experience the sheer excitement of hooking a fish (or shooting at a bird), and you can see the thrill of it come alive! They just can't wait to do it again!

Maybe we better not "publicize" the fact too much - a lot of our waters are too crowded already:rolleyes:

But enjoy it! It's apparently what we are here for, along with "procreation", but that's a lot more "dangerous sport" with lots of pitfalls, better left to you younger guys!:hehe:

BobK:D

Dble Haul
09-20-2003, 07:52 PM
Juro, your last paragraph encapsulates everything that I believe about all of this. Well said.

Bob, I know plenty of people who don't do this, and I certainly wouldn't call them "boring as hell". In fact, most of them are quite the opposite.

Pastimes are in the eye of the beholder.

striblue
09-20-2003, 10:47 PM
Good point Mark.. I certainly was not bored walking the beach...without my rod... to an area I find spectacular, especially with only my camera...You know how I love Flyfishing.. but it was still a good day when I beachcomb or the day I found a block and tackle encusted... which I have been told came drom a early 19th century wreck... I have narrowed the wreck to three clipper ships that had sunk "before" south beach was formed, only to pop up now. Other unusual timbers are showing up.. some with wooden pegs , some with holes where nails have rusted out...interesting.

Capt. Mel Simpson
09-21-2003, 07:32 AM
I often say to myself that no one could possibly feel what I feel about flyfishing. They may say they are flyfishermen but they don't really know, they don't really understand.

On friday I was sitting at home, paying bills, depressed because someone very close to me is having a difficult time with a serious illness, when I decided to call a freind. He answered and said "let me call you right back, I'm into a big school of snook!"

When he called me back he said,"meet me at the Maximo boat ramp in ten minutes". In the next four hours we cast to snook, redfish, permit and a tarpon of maybe 125#, a September 19th I will remember for a long time!

On the ride back to the ramp I looked at him and he just shook his head,....he knows!

Mel

seuss
09-21-2003, 05:51 PM
agree 100%.

but let's face it...you have x-ray vision. honed no doubt from your years as an eager and spritely co-ed.

and unfortunately for you, what this means is that to take your "game" to the next level, you're going to have to go at it blindfolded. to cater toward an enquivalent development of your other senses.

i don't see any other way (no pun intended)

Originally posted by juro
After a fairly solid season of flyfishing, I recently had a long stint without time on the water. Aside from the sense of anxiety, I had a really interesting experience when I finally got some time on the water and came home again...

my senses had become dramatically sharpened by the time I spent immersed in nature.

Let's face it, we are inseperable from earth, in all manner linked to her - mentally, physically and strangely even subconsciously. Suddenly I am seeing, thinking, reacting, dreaming with renewed clarity. My mind is stimulated from all the recent synaptic fireworks of my imagination exploring the possibilities of what stealthy tan and gold submarine might be lying under the guise of that standing wave, or painting images in the minds eye based on a glimmer of bait here or there, or even more profoundly from the emergence of a large fish from it's cloaked disguise in a shadowy channel to the sandy lane where my fly settles near the sand as I stand trying to be part of the scenery in the seconds of anticipation before the first strip in the fish's kill zone that triggers his fins to flare and rush to the fly, his large eyes visibly focused on the darting fly, his massive illusion of a body becoming crystal clear in the attack maneuver...

We were meant to be out there, perhaps even more than we know. I wonder what the rest of the human race does for redemption. Perhaps not enough.

Eddie
09-22-2003, 09:07 AM
People without passion are boring as hell.
I think that passion is the redeemer that Juro refers to.
I feel so lucky to have found fishing, but my intrests are no better/more noble than others I can't understand. I always remind myself that fishing is primarily a selfish endevour. Sure, I have shared my obsesion and limmited knowledge with hundreds of other anglers, but it's not as if my passion is medicine or teaching, law enforcement, public service, charity work etc.
Juro, you have put into words what many of us feel when we are in touch with wilderness, but lets not minimize the existance of so many that have given so much. I don't know that Mother Therisa had much time for the outdoors, but I don't think that she had to look very far for "redemption".
Yesterday, I was fishing on the rocks for stripers, and just felt out of synch. Baby was crying all night, I got out late, and fell in the water and broke one of my rods. The waves made it hard to keep contact with the shore, but I tried not to panic and it worked out ok in the end. Just a little banged up. I fished some more, but I was starting to get cold, and my heart wasn't really into it. As I sat on a rock putting away my gear I spotted two eyes in a small tidal pool. In the seaweed and the glare was a seven pound striper that had been stranded by the rapidly outgoing tide. Quite a few fishermen had been fishing, or passed by this spot, and I thought it was funny that no one else saw it. Their attention was trained on the water (where the fish are). I called over to my buddy, who was still fishing as I hoisted the fish out of this improbable puddle. He was pretty surprised. The fish revived quickly and after a long hot shower, so did I. My little moment of redemption.

juro
09-22-2003, 07:51 PM
Funny... you say you don't agree, but yet we agreed that getting out into the wild is the medicine, regardless of the tools you use to hunt it's the same; I choose a fly rod. We agreed that we go there to escape from the artificially flavored and colored world in which we are forced to work. Absolutely!

But what does "more attuned to sprituality" even mean??

I said that my predator senses were lit up after a day on the water when I came back to civilization, stuff I wouldn't notice with dulled senses jumped out at me. A spider moving across teh floor, changes in humidity and a taste of rain in the air. Stuff I would have missed if I remained dullened by four walls and artificial light. Killer senses, not fuzzy thoughts. I think you totally misread what I was saying, or you're reading more into it than there was, or you're not really reading it at all. You're new here I see but believe me I am a hunter on the water. I'd like to fish with you someday, I think you'll agree.

As far as all that other stuff you wrote I am not one of those flyfishers who passes judgement on anyone else's fishing preferences, but I do keep strict standards on what I choose to do, because quite simply put I fish for satisfaction when I am not in need of meat to survive. What I decide to do is not driven by any political, spriritual, or other funky motives you mentioned, I just want to be pleased with myself for how I defeat the challenges in the wild and I strive to perform better each time I go out. I am never more satisfied than when I succeed with a fly, thus that's why I fish this way all the time. The meat means very little to me, I could take it or leave it.

So what you said about the most difficult way possible is exactly what I practice, as I have preached many times. We agree on that.

Maybe I should have made it more clear that I was talking about HUNTER senses being charged up... but PLEASE... don't jump to conclusions that I am experiencing transcendental meditative levitation on the water or something here! :hehe:

Eddie
09-22-2003, 09:09 PM
Juro, you don't have to defend what you wrote. You were clear. Just because Ted Nugent calls you a sissy....;)

juro
09-23-2003, 08:29 PM
Believe me, I wasn't apologizing, just trying to set it straight. I think I get it now. Wish I didn't waste all that typing then :p

I assumed you were saying that my perspective on fishing was all that wussy crap you keep mentioning that you don't like. That would be very wrong. Believe me, we get on the water and I AM friggin RAMBO. :smokin: Just ask anyone I've fished with. In fact I'll bet you a chicken fried steak dinner that you can't keep up!

But if you aren't saying my perspective is all that homo stuff, then why do you keep bringing it up? I think you like to flyfish but don't like the image some bait guys stuck on you one day when you were out being "poetic" so you are flyphobic, but love to do it, what a dillemma!

I flyfish because I love it and don't give a rat's ass what others think.

juro
09-23-2003, 08:50 PM
I'll admit at this point I'm just enjoying the debate, interesting perspectives you've brought up, and as far as your gusto to speak up well there's nothing wrong with that. I hope we do get to chase steelhead together someday; I get out there to the PNW quite often. We can chuckle about a few things we have in common (although it wouldn't be apparent here) which are politically incorrect to mention on line.

Anyway, I've had the pleasure to fish in person with many of the guys here and although there is a distinct cerebral level of appreciation most of us share I've yet to meet a new-ager in the group in fact you ought to come out to meet the hardcore nor'easter striper gang, it's as far from new-age as you can get. We go to shore to do battle, and sometimes we win. Oh and don't wear your Mariners cap... I should know, I am a huge M's fan! :devil:

Just to give you an idea of the type of spirit here that guys like Doogue and Seuss have, I went to Fenway Park to watch a Red Sox game and the whole stadium broke out in a deafening chant of "Yankees Suck!". Why would I be surprised? They were playing the MARINERS! :hehe:

Welcome to the forum.

FrenchCreek
09-24-2003, 04:49 PM
It's the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat!
It's the sudden adrenalin rushes when hooked up!
It's the intellectual challenge of thinking like a rising trout who does everything but take my fly!
Its the quiet time drifting through slack water and wondering if the big one is lurking below!
Its the conflict between the excitement at casting to a fish that demands perfect presentation and fly selection and lite tippet and the need to be calm patient deliberate technically correct in the execution of the cast!
Its the pleasure of seeing someone else in the boat hook up and the envy that it was not me doing so.
It's knowing what to do and watching myself not do it that way!
Its coming home and needing to relax (my version) after having a relaxing day (my wife's version).
It just is beneficial
To each their own as far as classyfying IT, be it spiritual, pysiological, emotional, instinctual and all the other-al there are.

Robert Burton
09-24-2003, 05:02 PM
Originally posted by FrenchCreek

It's knowing what to do and watching myself not do it that way!

Good one :hehe:

Nailknot
09-25-2003, 10:38 PM
Juro- thanks for the words. Going on 10 years since I spent extensive (4+ weeks at a time) periods in "the woods" and was always amazed at how attuned, and how quickly, to natural rythems. And the jarring impact of the city after re-entry. The flow of moving water and the pace of flyfishing, is, to me, the best way to get that connection again on limited time. While I dig BC skiing and a few other wilderness activities, fly fishing seems to dial me in with the most happiness the most quickly. Damn I love our sport! :) Of course turning the experience into a competetive environment ruins that peace, which I'm sure Angie finds the peace shopping at Nordstroms or watching Friends. But she'll figure it out someday :) ;) BTW "Angie" I blasted the heads off a dozen ringnecks and shore lunched on fresh walleye last week so am I OK in your simple world? heehe :)

striblue
09-27-2003, 07:11 PM
BY the way... I was thinking about Kush and Doublespey today while on South Monomoy.