Update on Gaspé Fishing [Archive] - Fly Fishing Forum

: Update on Gaspé Fishing


LadyAmherst
06-08-2003, 02:44 PM
Hi all,
Guess Mother Nature is on time this year. We are seeing fish in the lower pools of the York, Dartmouth and St-Jean...
Ran up the York this morning......... guess who I saw???
http://www.quebecsporting.com/Photos/topherjune8.jpg
Yes!! Topher!! Photo: York 6 (June 8, 2003)


Hope you all enjoy your fishing this season!!

Lady Amherst

Topher Browne
06-09-2003, 04:01 PM
Fished the last two days: landed a feisty hen of 12 pounds on Sector 6 of the York shortly after the above photo was taken; also landed a super strong, sea-liced 12 pound hen this morning on the Unlimited Sector of the York. Needed all of a 9141-4 to land her as she ran under a bridge and out the other side; no way to follow, so crank down the drag, hold on, and reel.

There a lot more fish around this year as compared to last. It`s looking like the run is on time. Water temps on upper York: 47 degrees; lower York: 49 degrees. Water high, but clear. It`s relatively straightforward to see the fish as long as you can find a good vantage point above the river.

Just in to town of Gaspé to change some money, grab a Tim`s coffee, and find a computer. Headed back out `till dark.

Tight lines, TB

juro
06-09-2003, 05:32 PM
Awesome! Save a few biters for me... I am chompin' at the bit myself to get up there this summer. CND rods really need a good field test on the Gaspe'! :D

Topher Browne
06-17-2003, 05:20 PM
The season is off to a cracking start. There are a LOT more fish around this year as opposed to last, particularly the two-year class of multi-sea winter fish of 12 pounds or so who went missing last season.

I averaged a fish a day on the York after a slow first couple of days. My buddy Brian S. from the Empire State was into big fish all week with a 32 pounder, a 28 pounder, and a few more in the high teens and low twenties. As usual, it was about being in the right time at the right place. Everyone who hooked up regularly in the high water did so on 13'-15' two-handed rods and usually with a big Magog Smelt or a Picasse.

Let's hope there are a lot more fish this year and they are not just early! The Atlantic Salmon Federation predicts another 20,000 MSW (Multi-Sea Winter) fish of North American origin will find their way home after the last of the Greenland commercial buyouts. Fingers crossed.

Salar-1
06-18-2003, 07:28 AM
Topher
Just got back from the Matapedia.Sage 7136-4 WITH a hookkeeper :-O:tsk_tsk: :devil: Florescent Chartreuse flies seem to be the order of the day,along with big Black Bear Green Butts.BTW got a strong pull on a #4 Green Stonefly no less !!
Cheers
Brian

Topher Browne
06-18-2003, 09:48 AM
Brian,

Well done. Sounds like the run on the Matapedia, with the exception of some Causapscal fish, is not yet in full force. If some of the earlier rivers are a barometer, it should be a solid year. I plan to give it a try next week and will use plenty of fluorescent green in my flies!

Best regards, TB

wrke
06-20-2003, 07:03 AM
First day on the Petite yesterday yielded a bright 12 lb hen to a #6 Picasse.Not many fish in the river yet, but we're hopeful
bill

jcc_00
06-30-2003, 07:23 AM
Hope to hear more good news soon about the runs in the rivers this year.

JR SPEY
06-30-2003, 08:13 AM
The bad news is that it has been scorching hot up there. The York River reported a water temperature of 71 degrees F. late last week and the water levels were dropping. Since it's still June there is some concern. They need rain and cooler weather soon.

LadyAmherst
06-30-2003, 02:11 PM
Hi All,
Yes fish are here!! Weather was very, very hot these past few days....Today, however, it's actually cold and looks like rain!! Yes Rain!!
We are seeing fish right up to the gate pools on all three Gaspé river (York, St-Jean and Dartmouth)
Waters levels have dropped....... and with this cool weather water temperatures should improve.
Small leaders, small flies and a nice presentation should do the work !!

http://www.quebecsporting.com/Photos/releasing_13.jpg


Enjoy your fishing!!

jcc_00
07-01-2003, 04:41 PM
Bill (Wrke)

Tell me about what a # 6 Picasse looks like. Sounds like the hit of the day or something from the dark and desperate depths of the fly box

wrke
07-01-2003, 04:50 PM
JCC
Here's a #1 single and this fish I mentioned was on a 6 double, but you'll get the idea. The fly was devised by the Gaspé master Marc LeBlanc. I've recently seen variations that I don't like (silver pheasant is used as cheeks). I use the pheasant (as the original) as hackled one turn. I've used the fly on salmon in Quebec, New Brunswick and Russia (and steelhead in Oregon). It's one of my favorites.
Bill

flytyer
07-01-2003, 07:51 PM
wrke,

That is a very nice fly. I can readily see why the fish like it. Did you tie it?

I'm going to tie some and use them on summer steelhead. I have one question though, it looks like the body is formed of black-dyed mono, or am I mistaken? I'm going to use black V-rib or Swannandaze instead because it is easier to tie with.

wrke
07-01-2003, 08:12 PM
Tyer
Yes, I tied it. Sorry it's not a better example. This one actually took a fish. You're obviously good at this — it is, in fact, vinyl V rib — part of the original design. For the yellow, I've begun using yellow arctic fox, a few strands of black krystal flash, black kid goat, as I mentioned, 1 turn of silver pheasant. The spey hackle is black or dark grey spey hackle (your choice of origin). Summer steelhead seem to like it.
Bill

jcc_00
07-02-2003, 02:32 PM
Bill,

Very nice looking fly. I'll have to try it on the Eagle in August -looks like it could be a keeper

Thanks

flytyer
07-02-2003, 02:48 PM
wrke,

Thanks for the compliment. I saw the yellow artic fox fur underwing along with the black Krystal Flash. I wasn't sure about the black wing fur though, I knew it was either artic fox or kid goat though.

Also, I use some black Krystal Flash in the middle of a wing made of two small bunches of black artic fox on the Night Dancers (a Frank Amato fly found in Trey Combs last steelhead book) that I tie. I find the use a wee bit of Krystal Flash to improve the fish attracting qualities of many flies.

I'm also going to tie a variation of the fly you pictured by using purple (the deep bluish purple we steelheaders like) instead of the yellow in the wing.

You do tie a very nice fly.

jcc_00
07-03-2003, 03:51 PM
Bill,

What other beautiful and unusual flies have you found to be productive this season? I am interested in non-mainstream flies that are favorites of someone I can actually contact and discuss the fly with. Picasse is certainly unusual and attractive. Thanks

wrke
07-04-2003, 06:59 AM
JC
I can't post pic of flies from this year as Nikon has my camera at the moment. I had an undetected leak in my Aquapac and my digital got a little damp. But, I did take fish this year on a temple dog similar to the attached. The ones shown here are tied on Loop "bottle" tubes I use in Russia. The Gaspé flies are tied on unweighted plastic tubes. I use #8 Loop double hooks.
Bill

jcc_00
07-04-2003, 07:59 AM
Biil,
Thanks for the temple dog pics. What are loop tubes ? Brand name or special function tubes? Another question comes to mind. Outside the Northeast the world seems caught up in the use of tube flies but they haven't caught on, or so it seems, in Canada.
Tradition, or another reason for the slow adoption do you think?

jcc_00
07-04-2003, 08:01 AM
Bill,

Question should have been what are bottle tubes. I understand Loop as a brand - sorry

wrke
07-04-2003, 08:15 AM
JCC
Loop bottle tubes are shaped to help laying on materials without building up front of tube. Rear is shaped to help secure the junction tubing. They add weight, so can't be used on the rivers I fish on the Gaspé. Change sometimes comes slowly to areas steeped in tradition (answer to your question about Gaspé adoption of tubes, not a criticism of regs).
Bill

jcc_00
07-04-2003, 08:30 AM
Bill,

Very good - hadn't seen that bottle tube style before. Thanks

So, while the adoption of the tube flies on the Gaspé is slow to occur, have you used them with success so that you prefer them to tradtional flies in the area?

No intent to pin you down - sometimes I fish with old favorites because I like them - they satisfy me and maybe not the fish that might be holding. I am curious about their effectiveness though and whether, unbound by tradition, there is really a difference in their acceptance by the fish? Do you get more response from tube flies?

wrke
07-04-2003, 08:38 AM
JCC
I use plenty of traditional flies (and methods) and love them. But, I just like to experiment. Salmo is salmo where ever they occur. And O Mykiss is a very closely related cousin.
Bill

jcc_00
07-04-2003, 09:13 AM
Bill,

You sort of ducked my question on tube flies but let me ask another one on NY steelhead. My experience with Salmon River is nymphing with the chuck and duck method. Have you figured a way to get traditional grease line methods to be productive ?
There is such a PNW legacy around salmon and steelhead. The NY version seems so different

wrke
07-04-2003, 09:44 AM
JCC

Didn't mean to duck your question. I don't prefer one method or fly type over another. I'm very respectful of traditional flies and methods, and there's much to be learned from different areas and approaches. I just like to experiment (sometimes local dogma carries blinders). I don't necessarily get more response from traditionals or tubes.

Regarding NY steelhead, I've never fished the Salmon river and have only fished the Cat once. The streams just don't seem to interest me much. Although I love Trutta and Mykiss in the trout streams I fish, I always seem to only want anadromous fish in their native habitat.

Bill

jcc_00
07-04-2003, 05:03 PM
Bill,
I agree that anadromous fish in their own element are most spectacular. I was actually trying to figure out why tube flies have had such limited acceptance in the US and Canada. They are not really pretty as, say the flies of the PNW, or salmon hairwings, but the Brits and Nordics I work with swear they are the answer to the the salmon fisher's prayer.
My own experience with them is very limited, and I love the Atlantic hairwings and the steelhead flies from the West Coast.
One big difference is that in EU they fish trebles and keep what they catch. Tube flies have caught on over there but catch and release does not seem to have been embraced.......

Happy Fourth !

wrke
07-05-2003, 12:18 AM
JCC
As I attempted to say, I don't think tube flies are inherently more productive. There are times they work beautifully, but the same can be said for traditional flies. There are things that can be done with tubes that are difficult, if not impossible, with traditionals — and things that can be accompished best with traditionals. Very large flies can have a greater "landing" percentage with tubes because of the lack of leverage with small hooks. But I defy you to use a tube for the fly in the attached photo. The photographed fly landed 6 salmon from 6 to 16 lbs in a little over an hour last summer.
Bill

juro
07-05-2003, 06:19 AM
Jcc -

Two distinct advantages come from the de-coupling of the hook from the fly in tubes. This allows (1) replacement of a damaged hooked and more importantly to me (2) incredible stickiness to the hook because it's not part of a long stiff lever.

Trebles and doubles are rare in the US. Short shanked hooks like the Nordic single are popular in the pacific northwest and these are hard for fish to throw. You can search and find a ton of discussion on the topic in threads gone past.

Good luck

flytyer
07-06-2003, 03:00 AM
wrke,

Glad to see someone else here on this side of the pond ties and uses small Irish Shrimp style flies in the summer. They are one of my favorites when rivers reach low-water flows in mid summer.

jcc_00
07-06-2003, 08:51 AM
Wrke,

Intriguing penny fly - that will be some fun to try. When you catch the right time it is amazing what can happen, sounds like that fly has a great day associated with it. Thanks Bill

jcc_00
07-06-2003, 09:03 AM
JM,

I like the reduction of the leverage that the tube fly short shanked hook delivers. I was really trying to understand why the short-shanked tube fly is so popular in Europe but not really as
embraced here in the US. Bill's comment that it is just another method to try that can be very effective sometimes is likely is a good point - it is just curious to me that there is so much passion around tube flies outside the US. I probably just need to get out more - what do ya say, hit Iceland?

juro
07-06-2003, 10:24 AM
Sorry I didn't glean that from your posts. I meant to say that tube flies are very popular in the PNW, which is US / Canada - but not trebles. Was that your point?

Iceland sounds good. I almost went in 1996, but costs were too much for me. Besides I can do Washington, Oregon or BC on a showstring! :smokin:

Caught a nice chromer on the way down to the Sandy River Spey Clave on a tube mini-summer intruder pattern, nordic single short. First pass thru the pool. Ah the memories.

kush
07-06-2003, 12:10 PM
Bill,

Micro tubes for patterns such as you show are regularly used in the UK, at least some of the articles I have read in the British publication Salmon and Trout would indicate.

As well I regularly tie super sparse low water tubes like Green Butt Spratleys. The trick is finding suitable tubing, get tubing that is thin and micro tubes are a snap. The best material I have found so far is graphite tubing (rod tips). I get mine from CND master - Nobuo Nodera, but I am sure that most of us have a number of sources of broken rod tips!

wrke
07-06-2003, 01:29 PM
Kush

Great suggestion about rod tips! I also tie so called "micro" tube flies using very small tubing. I'm sure I can probably find a rod tip around here somewhere. I'll give it a try.

But, the advantages with TRULY tiny flies don't seem as great as the disadvantages compared with slightly larger ones. Perhaps the flies might last a little longer, but they can't be as delicate or as complex (although small flies should never be too complex) as those tied directly on a hook. Although the little fly pictured with the penny is an extreme case when fishing for Atlantic salmon with fish of over 30 lbs in the river (hook size on that fly is a 14 double), IMHO it wouldn't be appropriate to tie it with a tube — it wouldn't be as delicate or complex (considering the hook used, junction tubing, etc). And what size hook would you use?

Incidentally in re-reading my earlier post with the little fly, it smacks of braggadocio — I didn't catch all 6 of those salmon. There were 6 of us on a pool on a very special salmon river in Russia. I only caught one of the fish. But all six were caught on that fly and the fly doesn't seem worse the wear for it.

At any rate, I like the suggestion of the graphite tubes.

Bill

BobK
07-07-2003, 08:40 AM
And all of this came out of a simple post on "Update on Gaspe Fishing"!

I guess we do really "change subjects" from time to time, don't we!:hehe:

BobK

jcc_00
07-08-2003, 07:21 AM
I'm guilty of significant distraction with this thread but the discussion has been very good. Glad to hear from all of you and so now someone just needs to give us all an update on the Gaspé and we can close out

Topher Browne
07-08-2003, 10:23 AM
Like WRKE, I like the Loop Bottle Tube (click on the rotating Loop banner at the lower left and go to "Hooks/Tubes"): Inland showed me a low-water fly tied on a Loop Bottle Tube used with great success during the late season on Kharlovka.

I fished the Matapedia and Bonaventure the last week of June or so. The fishing was slow on the Matapedia (we saw a fish roll in French Rock, and that was about it), but we landed three nice chromers on the upper sectors of the Bonaventure over three days, and hooked a couple more.

Conditions were tough--air temperatures in the nineties and a lot of competition on the river--and I saw no fish released besides our own.

jcc_00
07-17-2003, 04:54 PM
Bill

What size hook is the Cent fly shrimp pattern in your photo image tied on?

wrke
07-17-2003, 05:22 PM
JCC
14 double
Bill

jcc_00
07-17-2003, 08:42 PM
Bill,

What other specialty patterns do you have up your sleeve?

wrke
07-17-2003, 09:04 PM
JCC

Way too many to get into here. We'd use up too much space. My suggestion is to read, experiment, tie whatever inspires you and try them. Quite frankly, the fish don't care that much.

And on seeing your post on the NUmpqua thread (my "home" steelhead river for about 30 years) all you probably need is a green butt skunk. And when you're on the river (if you absolutely must have more choices) go see Joe Howell (Blue Heron Flyfishing Shop). He'll tell you whatever he thinks is working on the river at the moment when you're there. He's a great guy.

bill

jcc_00
07-18-2003, 10:06 AM
Bill,

You are probably right, much as I hate to admit it. I have not experienced any fly that is more consistent than the GBS and a very few others. Although , like your Centfly example, we remain surprised often enough to keep searching and experimenting. I'm trying tube flies this week ....yikes.